November 5, 1984

OFFICIAL REPORT


FIRST SESSION-THIRTY-THIRD PARLIAMENT 33 Elizabeth II


VOLUME I, 1984 COMPRISING THE PERIOD FROM THE FIFTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1984 TO THE TWENTY-FIRST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1984 INDEX ISSUED IN A SEPARATE VOLUME


Published under authority of the Speaker of the House of Commons by the Queen's Printer for Canada Available from Canadian Government Publishing Centre, Supply and Services Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0S9.



Monday, November 5, 1984


FIRST SESSION-THIRTY-THIRD PARLIAMENT


The Thirty-second Parliament having been dissolved by proclamation on Monday, July 9, 1984, and writs having been issued and returned, a new Parliament was summoned to meet for the dispatch of business on Monday, November 5, 1984, and did accordingly meet on that day. This being the day on which Parliament is convoked by proclamation of Her Excellency the Governor General of Canada for the dispatch of business, and the Members of the House being assembled: Dr. Charles B. Koester, Esquire, Clerk of the House of Commons, read to the House a letter from the Administrative Secretary to the Governor General informing him that the Honourable Jean Beetz, Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada, in his capacity as Deputy Governor General, would proceed to the Senate Chamber to open the first session of the Thirty-third Parliament of Canada on Monday, the fifth day of November, at eleven o'clock a.m. A message was delivered by Claude Lajoie, Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, as follows: Members of the House of Commons: It is the desire of the Honourable the Deputy to Her Excellency the Governor General of Canada that this honourable House attend him immediately in the Chamber of the honourable the Senate. Accordingly, the House went up to the Senate Chamber, where the Speaker of the Senate said: Honourable Members of the Senate, Members of the House of Commons: I have it in command to let you know that Her Excellency the Governor General of Canada does not see fit to declare the causes of her summoning the present Parliament of Canada until a Speaker of the House of Commons shall have been chosen, according to law; but this afternoon at the hour of three o'clock p.m. Her Excellency will declare the causes of her calling Parliament.


ELECTION OF SPEAKER

PC

Martin Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, today, we are convoking a new Parliament, a new assembly

of the Canadian people. Many Members of this Parliament have never sat in the House of Commons before, including many of those sitting on the Government side, and it is indeed important for an institution like Parliament to be revitalized through the democratic process.

At a moment like this it is useful to recall the words of a great parliamentarian, Edmund Burke. He said:

Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests ... But Parliament is a deliberative assembly with one interest, that of the whole-

These words we should imprint in our minds as we gather to elect a Speaker to preside over our deliberations and act as the custodian of the rights of all Members.

The role of Speaker is the noblest centrepiece of our democratic system. Going back as far as Sir Thomas Hungerford under Edward III, the Speaker of the House of Commons has been the guarantor of Parliament's privileges and the curator of Parliament's traditions.

The House functions effectively to the degree and to the extent that the Speaker understands and applies his role as an absolutely impartial arbitrator. He is not the servant of the Government or the servant of special interests but the servant of the House. He must be impeccably fair and unfailingly conscious of the duties and the rights of the individual Member.

The words of Speaker Lenthall to Charles I have echoed magnificently down the corridors of time:

I have only eyes to see and ears to hear as the House may direct.

Never has there been, in my judgment, a truer or more accurate formulation of the Speaker's function.

[ Translation]

The Speaker represents the House in its entirety. He presides over its proceedings and interprets its procedures. He directs the work of its Members according to rules dictated by custom, tradition and dignity. The Speaker must often draw on his personal qualities and skills. He must have a thorough knowledge of the role and procedure of the House of Commons. He must be able to interpret the intentions of its Members. He must be able to adapt to the circumstances and at all times have a clear perception of the atmosphere and spirit appropriate to the House. Finally, he must be able to preside over the debates in both official languages of Confederation.

November 5, 1984

Election of Speaker

It is not absolutely necessary that he be newly married-

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
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PC

Martin Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Mulroney:

-or that his wife be bilingual, as is the case with the present nominee for this exalted position. This is simply an added bonus in the case of the Hon. Member for Don Valley West.

I am happy to report to the House that we have managed to find in his person an individual possessing to the highest degree all the qualities necessary for this vital position in our parliamentary structure.

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
PC

Martin Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Mulroney:

He is tactful. He is informed of the rules and procedures of the House. He possesses in full-and of this there can be no doubt-the integrity and ability required for this vital role.

I am also happy that this is the view of the Right Hon. Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Turner) and the view, as well, of the Leader of the New Democratic Party (Mr. Broadbent) who may have some comments in regard to the procedure which perhaps are different and-who knows-perhaps for a better procedure for the selection of Speakers in the future. However, we all agree that the Hon. Member for Don Valley West possesses all the high qualities required for this vital job.

The Hon. Member for Don Valley West came to the House in 1979 and almost immediately became conspicuous for the energy which he directed to his parliamentary duties. He developed a deep respect for this House, a love of its traditions, an understanding of its procedures and an admiration for all those who strive so mightily to become its Members. He combines these qualities with a sense of history and a sense of humour. Neither shall be a burden to him here.

I therefore have the privilege to move the nomination of the Hon. Member for Don Valley West (Mr. Bosley) as Speaker of the House of Commons.

I am therefore privileged to propose the Hon. Member for Don Valley West as Speaker of the House of Commons.

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
LIB

John Napier Turner (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. John N. Turner (Leader of the Opposition):

Dr.

Koester, first may I say what a great privilege and honour it is to have been elected once again to this House of Commons. I want to thank the people of Vancouver Quadra who did me this honour and to assure them that I will do my utmost in turn to merit their confidence and their trust.

I am very pleased to rise in my place today to second the nomination of the Right Hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) of Mr. John Bosley as Speaker of this House. I might say, had circumstances been different, I would have preferred to move

the motion than to second it. However, I understand what the people of Canada have said and accept that fully.

I am also very happy to see Mr. Stanley Knowles sitting at the Table.

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
LIB

John Napier Turner (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. Turner (Vancouver Quadra):

He sits as an honorary Member of this House. No doubt his wisdom and experience will be of immense assistance to the new Speaker particularly, and to all of us in this Chamber.

Without in any way derogating from the choice which I second today, it might be well for future Parliaments to consider what the unanimous report of the Special Committee on Standing Orders and Procedure recommended in the last Parliament, namely, the adoption of a new Standing Order which would provide for the election of the Speaker by secret ballot by all Members of the House. That will be something for a future Parliament to consider. As I have said, that in no way derogates from our approval of the particular choice this morning.

Perhaps it is also appropriate on this Guy Fawkes Day, as we open Parliament and elect a Speaker, that we remember that democratic institutions have sometimes been under attack, the Mother of Parliaments, to a lesser extent in this country than in other parts of the free world. Recent events indicate to us what a precious and fragile thing democracy is. The Speaker represents this Commons as the embodiment of the will of the people. Protecting the rights and privileges of this House will be Mr. Bosley's primary concern and, more important, defending the rights and privileges of its Members.

It is particularly important in this Parliament, with the large majority on the Government side-and I might say surrounding us-that the Speaker exercise special care and vigilance in the protection of the rights of Hon. Members and, might I say, the traditional rights of Her Majesty's Loyal and Official Opposition.

In this Parliament, where the Government has a considerable majority, it is particularly important that the Speaker should exercise special vigilance in protecting the rights of Members forming the Official Opposition in this House.

From this point forward, Mr. Bosley must abandon all partisan loyalties and render decisions which are free of any hint of partisanship or bias. As Beauchesne says, confidence in the impartiality of the Speaker is an indispensable condition of the successful working of procedure. He must be fair and impartial in all his rulings, and above all he must be independent.

November 5, 1984

Like the Government Members, we in the Opposition also have our rights and duties. We shall observe the traditional role of the Official Opposition, and we are counting on the assistance and co-operation of the Speaker to help preserve this tradition.

I am sure that Mr. Bosley is fully aware of the tremendous responsibility he has taken on, and I can give him the assurance that the Liberal Members of this House join me in supporting his nomination.

We are looking forward to working together in the spirit of co-operation and conciliation, that is so essential to the functioning of this House.

On a more personal note, to echo the words of the Prime Minister, I am sure that all Members join with me in offering Mr. Bosley our congratulations on his recent marriage.

Allow me, Mr. Bosley, to express the hope that the harmony you will bring to the proceedings of this House will reflect the personal harmony you will enjoy in your married life.

I am pleased, therefore, to second the nomination by the Right Hon. Prime Minister of the Member for Don Valley West, Mr. John Bosley, as Speaker of this Thirty-third Parliament of Canada.

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
NDP

John Edward Broadbent

New Democratic Party

Hon. Edward Broadbent (Oshawa):

I would like to preface my comments on this motion by noting the new degree of civility that has entered the House with the Leaders of all Parties being given the appropriate due respect, not only by Members in Opposition Parties but by Members of their own caucus, and I am sure 1 speak for all three Leaders when I say we hope this tradition continues!

1 want, Dr. Koester, to say in speaking to this motion that my colleagues and myself most heartily endorse the personal selection of the Member for Don Valley West. He demonstrated during his experience in this House all of those qualities that I am sure will make him a truly admirable Speaker of the House, a bilingual person of real intelligence and capacity to work. I am sure we will see in the days ahead a man with a fine sense of justice.

It is appropriate to add my compliments and congratulations on his recent marriage. I am sure that new experience will constitute an element in his life that will enrich his judgments in this Chamber as well. As the whole House knows, the Speaker has a residence in this place.

As I explained before, we would like to be able to choose the Speaker of the House. 1 would also be in favour of a different procedure. In the past, a Committee of this House did suggest another method for selecting the Speaker. The Leader of the Opposition has indicated that his Party would support a change of this kind, and I just want to say that in future, we in

Election of Speaker

our Party would like to be able to choose the Speaker and to do so according to a similar procedure.

For the moment, as I said, we have selected a man who will have the confidence of my colleagues, a man who I dare say could have been selected if we had used that other process.

I compliment the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) on his recommendation and the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Turner) for seconding the motion. I conclude by simply saying that it is a traditional route of selecting a Speaker, and a Prime Minister who is both a Conservative and who quotes Edmund Burke perhaps could not have been expected at the commencement of this period in office to have selected a different route.

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

The Clerk of the House declared the motion carried in the affirmative and John William Bosley, Esquire, Member for the electoral district of Don Valley West, duly elected to the Chair of the House.

Mr. Bosley was conducted from his seat in the House to the Speaker's Chair by the Right Hon. Brian Mulroney and the Right Hon. John N. Turner.

Topic:   OFFICIAL REPORT
Subtopic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Sub-subtopic:   MR. JOHN WILLIAM BOSLEY, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF DON VALLEY WEST
Permalink

November 5, 1984