June 21, 1984

LIB

Robert Mose Patrick Daudlin

Liberal

Mr. Robert Daudlin (Essex-Kent):

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Whelan), and through him the Government, will be aware that the farm community of southern Ontario and, by extension, all agriculture, were dismayed at the actions of the Province of Quebec last year when it refused tomatoes and other product from Ontario in litre containers.

The federal Government has, we know, passed the appropriate regulations for use in Canada of the four litre containers, and the Province of Ontario has provided certain guarantees for container cost subsidies, but the Province of Quebec to date has not passed implementing regulations, and the season will be fast upon us.

Undertakings to study will not allow the free movement of product, and in the end the farmers will be those who will be made suffer through packing products for which they will not be paid. This is clearly unfair and unacceptable.

The time has come for trade between provinces to be unhampered by artificial barriers, and if necessary the Minister must convoke a meeting of his Ontario and Quebec counterparts in order that a political will be developed and enforced, such that the necessary regulations will be put in place before the shipping season commences.

At a time when Canadians should be pulling together and Canadian markets should be shared openly and fairly so as to create more jobs through increased productivity, no stone should be left unturned in our search to remove restrictive trade barriers within Canada.

We should explain to Mr. Garon that by opening the market to Ontario products, he is helping Canadians from Quebec who are trying to find jobs in Ontario through the federal Department of Employment and Immigration.

We are one country. Let us find the means to act like it.

June 21, 1984

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   REJECTED ACCESS TO QUEBEC MARKET FOR ONTARIO TOMATOES
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POLITICAL PARTIES

PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE PARTY LEADERSHIP

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, perceptive Canadians will have noticed something of considerable impact over the last several weeks. With the Liberal Party in disarray, divided and squabbling among itself, with a lame duck Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau), who has lost interest in government, and a new Leader who seems more interested in milking the last few dollars from his corporate directorships than in taking over the reins, it is the Official Opposition that is assuming, even now, the role of government and conducting itself in the responsible and competent manner expected of a Government, but which is so sadly lacking with the Liberals.

For example, just yesterday when Mr. Turner was pontificating over how many non-elected bodies he should co-opt into his Cabinet, it was the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Mulroney) who was in Washington, preserving jobs for Canadians in our threatened steel industry, and fighting against the hazards of acid rain.

Canadians are realizing that even before the next general election it is the Conservatives, not the Liberals, to whom they should look for leadership in conducting the affairs of the nation.

Topic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Subtopic:   PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE PARTY LEADERSHIP
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INDUSTRY

TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY-CLOSING OF PLANTS

LIB

Claude Tessier

Liberal

Mr. Claude Tessier (Megantic-Compton-Stanstead):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to make a statement under the provisions of Standing Order 21 and ask this Government to consider the disastrous effects of textile and clothing imports which seem to be out of control, with or without quotas. This is causing serious harm and creating an intolerable situation. The closing, announced yesterday, of Celanese Canada Limited in Coati-cook, in my riding, is not only a social and economic tragedy for the employees who will lose their jobs, but also a very real disappointment, first to the employer, considered to be progressive because of investments in modernizing a plant which, unfortunately, has been losing money since 1982, and an even greater disappointment to the workers, especially since they had made every effort at the right time to get through the slump in the textile industry and the economic recession.

The people are asking the Government to do what can be done to protect their jobs or give them new ones right away, because the only thing these workers want is to keep their jobs. If they cannot, they feel the Government should create new ones, since uncontrolled imports are one of the immediate causes of the lack of sufficient markets.

Topic:   INDUSTRY
Subtopic:   TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY-CLOSING OF PLANTS
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VISIBLE MINORITIES

JAPANESE CANADIANS INTERNED DURING WORLD WAR 11-GOVERNMENT POSITION

NDP

Lynn McDonald

New Democratic Party

Ms. Lynn McDonald (Broadview-Greenwood):

Mr. Speaker, in announcing its response to the report on visible minorities yesterday, the Government has taken the first step in dealing with the Japanese Canadian compensation issue. It did acknowledge the injustices done to Japanese Canadians in World War II and its aftermath. It did acknowledge the suffering caused thereby. However, it is only a first step, and in announcing only a very general fund to combat racism it has not dealt adequately with the complex issue of compensation.

Now is the time for Parliament to act, and there still is time before the end of the session. Parliament should spend one hour addressing this issue with all-Party support. There should be a motion acknowledging these injustices, and an opening of the door to compensation with proper negotiations with duly elected representatives of the National Association of Japanese Canadians.

Further, Mr. Speaker, it is important that there be a re-examination of the War Measures Act, the legislation that enabled these injustices to happen in the first place. It is not enough to say that now that we have a Charter this will not happen again. These injustices did occur in the United States, which has an entrenched Charter, and we have to work to change the legislation that permitted them in the first place. The Japanese Canadian community expects no less from Parliament, that Canadians, representatives of all Parties, speak on this issue. We will not have justice in the future until we recognize the injustices committed in the past.

Topic:   VISIBLE MINORITIES
Subtopic:   JAPANESE CANADIANS INTERNED DURING WORLD WAR 11-GOVERNMENT POSITION
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ATTITUDE OF NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY MEMBERS

LIB

André Maltais

Liberal

Mr. Andre Maltais (Manicouagan):

Mr. Speaker, I must admit that last night it was extremely embarrassing, as a Member of Parliament, to witness the parliamentary circus in which all Members took part. I want to censure the attitude of the NDP, which certainly abused the privileges of this institution yesterday. I know that today, in some parliaments, we find people who want to settle problems with guns, and what happened last night and early this morning just goes to show that people are right to be suspicious of the qualifications of parliamentarians or the validity of the institution as such.

Mr. Speaker, I wish the Chair could make some new rules about this sort of thing, because what we saw last night is certainly unacceptable. Mr. Speaker, I would also like to know the cost to the House of Commons in terms of overtime for all services that had to work from nine o'clock last night until five o'clock this morning. The NDP claims that public money is

June 21, 1984

being wasted but I think that yesterday, those same people showed an incredible lack of responsibility and lack of respect for Canadian taxpayers.

Topic:   ATTITUDE OF NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY MEMBERS
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ATTITUDE OF NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY MEMBERS
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EDUCATION

FRENCH FRANQOIS-BUOTE SCHOOL IN CHARLOTTETOWN

PC

Thomas Michael McMillan (Deputy House Leader of the Official Opposition; Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Tom McMillan (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the attention of Parliament to the existence of a French school in Prince Edward Island, in my riding. It was founded in September 1980. Today the school has twenty-one pupils, from the first to the eighth grade. The school employs two teachers full time and one teacher part time.

Initially, the school's expenditures were paid for directly and almost exclusively by the federal Government. Today, the provincial Government is gradually increasing its contribution with funds derived from federal transfer payments. More than half of the school's pupils are children of employees of the Department of Veterans Affairs. In fact, establishing the school was a prerequisite for moving the Department from Ottawa to Charlottetown. At the Franjois-Buote school, English is taught only as a second language. Next week, we will have the pleasure of inaugurating the new building of the Department of Veterans Affairs in Charlottetown. The Fran-fois-Buote School-

Topic:   EDUCATION
Subtopic:   FRENCH FRANQOIS-BUOTE SCHOOL IN CHARLOTTETOWN
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. Unfortunately, the Hon. Member's time has expired.

Topic:   EDUCATION
Subtopic:   FRENCH FRANQOIS-BUOTE SCHOOL IN CHARLOTTETOWN
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NATIONAL REVENUE

DEPARTMENT'S TREATMENT OF ARTISTS-COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

LIB

Douglas Glenn Fisher

Liberal

Mr. Douglas Fisher (Mississauga North):

Mr. Speaker, last winter the House ordered the Standing Committee on Communications and Culture to investigate the impact of tax policies and tax administration on Canada's arts community. I had the honour to chair a special subcommittee on the issue, and we reported on it today.

We found one problem which requires fast action. We urge Revenue Canada to review the files of artists reassessed prior to April 1, 1984. Many were asked to pay very high amounts of tax which they cannot afford. On the other hand, artists assessed after April 1 face lower demands. We found that their tax deductions and claims were similar to those of the first group.

The difference is that Revenue Canada has changed its assessment policy. The change is welcome, but has created inequity for some artists. After April 1 Revenue Canada is looking only at claims for the current year and back one year. Before April 1 it looked back at claims for four years. I urge the Government to make these reassessments equal and fair for all artists. The new policy is much better. The situation should be made consistent by providing refunds where past demands went back too far into the past.

Topic:   NATIONAL REVENUE
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT'S TREATMENT OF ARTISTS-COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION
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June 21, 1984