June 20, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

POLITICAL PARTIES

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, thinking that the Liberal Party still retains some vestige of collective intelligence, I had so wagered on the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (Mr. Chretien) last weekend. However, the death wish was amongst them and they disregarded the one candidate who might have stood them one small chance of success in the next election.

Doomed to failure with a Leader whose first act as the Prime Minister designate was to impose closure on the security Bill, therefore showing his disdain for Canadians and the institution of Parliament, the Liberals struggle manfully on to the oblivion that awaits them at the polls. Now that our friend from the ivory towers of Bay Street corporate law is to give up his lucrative directorships in CPR, Massey-Ferguson, Bechtel, Seagram's, et cetera, let me suggest that after the next election Mr. Turner could always keep body and soul together by selling Glad bags on television.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Sub-subtopic:   RESULT OF LIBERAL PARTY LEADERSHIP CAMPAIGN
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POLITICAL PARTIES

PC

Arnold John Malone

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Arnold Malone (Crowfoot):

Mr. Speaker, westerners are proud people of honour who believe that a handshake agreement is a contractual bond. Then the bomb arrived. The true Grit Edmonton mayor who nominated the Minister of Justice (Mr. MacGuigan) for Leader of the Liberal Party did a 100-yard dash to self-serving safety, right in the middle of round one. Commitment and loyalty were consumed by nervousness. The mayor's Liberal instinct was to seek power with honour if necessary, but not necessarily an honourable power. His was a buddy system that left his friend choking in the water while he climbed into a new self-preservation suit. What may we expect of a person who so openly betrays a friend? Would this person also pretend to oppose wage and price controls, or fool people into believing that we could have cheap

gasoline in spite of world price, or speak with a forked tongue about co-operative federalism?

Apparently winning was more important than honour. In his game the score is irrelevant. The rules, written or otherwise, are there to be broken. All that matters is the glitter of the trophy at the pinnacle of power. When Lawrence was elected mayor of Edmonton, some people thought they might be getting a polished apple for the West; sadly, all we got was Decore.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Sub-subtopic:   LIBERAL PARTY LEADERSHIP CONVENTION-ROLE OF EDMONTON MAYOR
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MEDICAL CARE

LIB

Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, concern over the uncertain role of medicine in law enforcement is growing among many Canadian doctors. The focal point of their concern is that government intervention in the practice of medicine is increasing, and the time-honoured concept of doctor-patient confidentiality is in a state of serious erosion. Some of the questions doctors are now asking are: should a physician be required to use his or her clinical skills, or the information gathered, to enforce the laws of the land? To what extent should he or she be allowed to use professional discretion in determining the relevance of the knowledge so acquired?

Doctors generally agree that confidentiality is not for their benefit but for the patient's. If this confidentiality is destroyed, patients will be reluctant to communicate certain intimate facts, and physicians will stop keeping accurate records. The Canadian Medical Association is particularly concerned about pending CSIS legislation which will give an investigator special status, authorizing him to go into a physician's office and obtain information pertaining to matters under investigation. Physicians need to be reassured that access to medical records is a rare requirement in protecting the security of Canada, and that it is to be subjected to a rigorous process of control and review by Ministers of the Crown and the judiciary, along with a Security Intelligence Review Committee.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MEDICAL CARE
Sub-subtopic:   ROLE OF MEDICINE IN LAW ENFORCEMENT
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PUBLIC SERVICE

NDP

Lyle Stuart Kristiansen

New Democratic Party

Mr. Lyle S. Kristiansen (Kootenay West):

Mr. Speaker, earlier today a number of students from the Canadian Labour College gathered on Parliament Hill to make a clear statement

that public sector workers should have their political freedom. Over 400,000 public employees across the country are denied their basic political rights. In a democracy the freedom of a citizen to take political action is considered to be a basic right. It should only be removed when persons have proven themselves to be unworthy of that right. In the case of public sector workers, it was removed because the political Parties, their employers, were abusing the power and the system.

In the 1980 federal election all political Parties were asked if they supported the principle that public sector workers should have the same basic rights as other citizens to participate in the political processes of Canada, and, if elected, would their Parties introduce legislation to that effect. All three Parties agreed that the law should be reviewed and revised. In 1979 an all-Party committee said:

Simply because political participation is a right of citizens, we believe that this should be the principle that applies to public servants, only limited in the exceptional cases where any indication of partisan political interests would compromise the reputation of the public service for impartiality or would damage the individual's effectiveness as a public servant.

Only the NDP has kept that promise. My colleague, the Hon. Member for Regina West (Mr. Benjamin), has at present just such a Bill on the Order Paper, C-248, and I ask all Members to help keep their own Parties-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   EXERCISE OF POLITICAL RIGHTS BY EMPLOYEES
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The Hon. Member's time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   EXERCISE OF POLITICAL RIGHTS BY EMPLOYEES
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

PC

Frederick James (Jim) Hawkes

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jim Hawkes (Calgary West):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we may have been a little premature in criticizing the new Liberal Leader so heavily for being briefed. Today's Globe and Mail tells us that it seems the briefings are doing some good. The new Leader has discovered there are two million unemployed in the country, including 800,000 young people. For that we thank the briefings.

The other revealing part of that article is that there seems to be a concern on the part of the new Liberal Leader to have some activity on the employment front prior to the next federal general election. What that tells us is that during those briefings the new Liberal Leader may have discovered where the hidden pot of job creation money is. We have stood in this House and said that the Government opposite has hidden funds which it intends to trot out just prior to an election. Ministers are using the unemployed as pawns in a political game. They do not really care about getting jobs. They do care about getting re-elected. These briefings seem to confirm that fact. There is a difference between beef and baloney, and we know the difference.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT-POSITION OF LIBERAL PARTY LEADER
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ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

PC

John Horton McDermid

Progressive Conservative

Mr. John McDermid (Brampton-Georgetown):

Mr. Speaker, in 1970 the English and Wabigoon River systems in Ontario were declared unsafe due to methyl mercury pollution from the Reed Paper Company's pulp mill at Dryden. These rivers are still closed today. The closing of these rivers destroyed the economic base of two Indian communities. The Indians of White Dog and Grassy Narrows lost their incomes, their employment, their source of food, as well as their dignity. Since then Great Lakes Forest Products bought out the Reed Paper Company after that company agreed to compensate the native community with some SI5 million. To date this has not been done, after 15 years.

In the interest of human dignity and justice, I would urge the Prime Minister-elect to use his new position, and I might add his position as director of CP Limited and CP Investments, which are the major shareholders of Great Lakes Forest Products, to put in a good word and urge this company, of which he is still a small part, to fulfil their promise of compensation to the native population of Grassy Narrows and White Dog.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   POLLUTION OF ONTARIO RIVERS-DELAY IN PAYMENT OF COMPENSATION
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HUMAN RIGHTS

NDP

Robert Joseph Ogle

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bob Ogle (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, today I would like to bring to the attention of the House the fact that Amnesty International has declared that Wilson Ferreira and his son, Juan Raul Ferreira, are detained in custody in the country of Uruguay. This man was the Leader of the opposition Party which is known as the Blancos. He was attempting to return to Uruguay to participate in the election which is scheduled for October. During the 11 years that he has been in exile he has protested against the human rights violations which have taken place in his own country. Members of this House in all three Parties who served on the Latin American sub-committee know about this situation from personal experience. Ferreira has attempted to bring this reality to the whole world.

At this time I call upon the Government of Canada to protest vehemently against what has happened to Mr. Ferreira, a fellow parliamentarian, if it has not done so already. I call upon the Minister of External Affairs to ensure that our embassy in Buenos Aires, which looks after Uruguay, approaches the Government of that country to see that these two people are released immediately from prison.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   URUGUAY-DETENTION OF OPPOSITION LEADER AND SON
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CANADA POST CORPORATION

PC

William C. Scott

Progressive Conservative

Mr. W. C. Scott (Victoria-Haiiburton):

Mr. Speaker, Canada Post Corporation has of late taken many interesting detours from its only mandate, delivering the mail. It has experimented with selling goods for Consumers Distributing, and has considered selling sports pool tickets. While on its detours it seems to have lost its sense of time and direction.

I received a complaint from a constituent this week which described how it took from May 18 until June 9, 22 days, to deliver a letter from Toronto to Bolsover, Ontario, a distance of 75 miles. Another constituent waited 13 days in May for a cheque to be delivered from Pefferlaw to Markham, a distance which can be travelled in less than an hour. Yet another constituent demanded a trailer be unloaded by Canada Post to see if it contained a christening gown which was long overdue. Sure enough, when the trailer was searched the gown was found, long after the christening.

On behalf of my constituents and all Canadians I urge the Government to allow Canada Post to return to its primary mandated function. It is about time it devoted its time to improving mail service and nothing else.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA POST CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   DELAY IN MAIL DELIVERIES
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The Hon. Member for Winnipeg-Birds Hill.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA POST CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   DELAY IN MAIL DELIVERIES
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NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie (N.D.P. Caucus Chair)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Blaikie:

Mr. Speaker, I am rising on Standing Order

21.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA POST CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   DELAY IN MAIL DELIVERIES
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June 20, 1984