May 30, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

PC

Stan Darling

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stan Darling (Parry Sound-Muskoka):

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   WORLD MILITARY EXPENDITURES-SUGGESTED ONE-YEAR FREEZE
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NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION

PC

Ronald Alexander Stewart

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ron Stewart (Simcoe South):

Mr. Speaker, this week the 16 Foreign Ministers of the NATO countries meet for the Alliance's thirty-fifth anniversary meeting. "Peace and freedom through deterrence" has been NATO's strategy since 1949, and it has been a successful one. This strategy has worked as a deterrent to Soviet aggression since 1949 because

NATO members have remained firm in their resolve, despite the best efforts of the peace movement, that pledging a no first use of nuclear weapons would encourage Moscow to launch a conventional attack on western Europe.

At the Atlantic Treaty Association conference last year NATO Secretary General, Joseph Luns, made the following observation:

It has always been an imbalance in weaponry and manpower, coupled with a desire to impose one's will on others by force, which has led nations to consider it worth the risk of beginning a war .. . The safest way to preserve peace is to ensure as close a balance as possible between the arsenals on each side.

That is the principle which must guide the Alliance in the future as we seek fair and verifiable agreements with the Soviet Union.

As Canadians we must live up to the goals to which we are committed. Estimates of defence expenditures as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product for 1983 place us at the bottom of all NATO partners with 2.1 per cent, just ahead of Luxembourg. Our NATO partners deserve and expect more from us in the future.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION
Sub-subtopic:   LEVEL OF CANADIAN SUPPORT
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ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

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Mr. Pierre Gimai@

Mr. Speaker, last week I heard on the news that the Quebec Minister of the Environment was very proud of the fact that the provincial government was going to proceed with a program to renovate the copper smelter facility at Noranda. Surprisingly, the Minister announced the policy only a few days after the Hon. Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources of the Government of Canada had released a report on non-ferrous metals and smelters across Canada. For over two years, the Quebec Minister has failed to show any concern about the acid rain issue. Now that the Government of Canada has released an excellent and well-researched report, describing the policies and technologies that must be introduced to fight acid rain and upgrade existing technology in non-ferrous smelters, it is rather surprising to see the provincial government wake up all of a sudden and ask for federal assistance, especially since it was at the Federal-Provincial Conference, boycotted by the Quebec Minister of Energy and Resources, that the federal Minister asked for implementation of such policies.

May 30, 1984

Finally, Mr. Speaker, I would like to point out that the only province that was politically hostile and refused to offer any co-operation at the ministerial level with respect to preparing for and organizing the conference, was unfortunately, my home province, the province of Quebec. I think it is unfortunate, because for the benefit of all Canadians, the Government-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   ALLEGATIONS MADE BY QUEBEC MINISTER OF THE ENVIRONMENT
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. The Hon. Member's time has expired. The Hon. Member for Winnipeg-Birds Hill (Mr. Blaikie).

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   ALLEGATIONS MADE BY QUEBEC MINISTER OF THE ENVIRONMENT
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BANK ACT

NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie (N.D.P. Caucus Chair)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bill Blaikie (Winnipeg-Birds Hill):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to recall the attention of the House to the issue of the Royal Bank's car buy-back loan program, an issue which was previously raised by my colleague, the Hon. Member for Winnipeg North (Mr. Orlikow), on May 11.

Automobile dealers in my riding have expressed to me what I think should be a concern of all of us in the House, that the Royal Bank may be flouting the will of Parliament by implementing what could well be argued is the leasing of vehicles, an idea which the House rejected when we last debated the Bank Act. It was the clear intent of the House at that time that banks not be allowed to get into the business of leasing vehicles. The Royal Bank's buy-back plan, for all practical purposes, is a form of closed-end leasing under a different name.

The Minister of State for Finance (Mr. MacLaren) indicated to my colleague on May 11 that the Royal Bank plan was under review and that, when the review was completed, he would be able to give an answer. I call upon him to come forward soon and indicate whether the Government intends to let the Royal Bank get away with this or whether it intends to do something about it.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   BANK ACT
Sub-subtopic:   ROYAL BANK'S CAR BUY-BACK PROGRAM
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THE CONSTITUTION

IND

William J. Yurko

Independent

Mr. Bill Yurko (Edmonton East):

Mr. Speaker, the very First paragraph in the Constitution Act, 1981, which is Canada's Constitution, states: "Whereas Canada is founded upon the principles that recognize the supremacy of God and the rule of law."

Just how would the Supreme Court interpret and uphold these principles? So I dare ask this Parliament, which passed this Constitution Act, what are these principles? Where are they transcribed? How is this nation, Canada, which is founded upon these principles, to know these principles? Are these principles taught in our schools, in our homes, in our churches, or in our institutions?

On November 23, 1983, I suggested in this assembly that this Parliament proclaim a Day of Prayer in Canada in early 1984, a day on which each of us might dwell upon these principles, a day on which we might all pray for world peace and brotherhood, a day on which each of us, after his or her own manner, can quietly recognize the supremacy of God.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE CONSTITUTION
Sub-subtopic:   UNDERLYING PRINCIPLES-PLEA FOR PROCLAMATION OF DAY OF PRAYER
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FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS TRANSFER PAYMENTS TO QUEBEC

LIB

Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Employment and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I made a statement under the provisions of Standing Order 21 about fiscal transfer payments to the province of Quebec.

Today I noticed, and my hon. friend for Lac-Saint-Jean (Mr. Gimai'el) will corroborate me on this, an article in the newspaper La Presse which reported some comments made by the Member for Argenteuil in the National Assembly, Mr. Claude Ryan, who gave some very telling figures. I want to congratulate him and thank him for what he said to the PQ counterparts in Quebec, namely, that if the provinces have the means "to provide plans for free health insurance, hospital insurance, and school and university tuition programs, it is because federal transfer payments made these plans possible. We could not have done this alone. We must realize that! And when we are talking about the pros and cons of the federal system, these are points that must be conceded." Mr. Ryan also commented that between 1974 and 1984, transfer payments received by Quebec from Ottawa increased by 346 per cent. During the same period, Quebec's own tax revenues increased by only 240 per cent. Federal transfer payments represented the following percentages of the federal Budget: 4 per cent in 1937, rising to 8 per cent in 1960 and 20 per cent in 1983. Those are the advantages of Canadian federalism and that is the kind of thing Quebecers should be told, to encourage them to remain in Confederation and continue to be a part of Canada. The province of Quebec must continue to be a part of this country!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS TRANSFER PAYMENTS TO QUEBEC
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AGRICULTURE

PC

Roch La Salle

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Roch La Salle (Joliette):

Over a month ago, Mr. Speaker, Quebec UPA spokesmen and certain Government Members met with the Minister of Agriculture to seek finan-

May 30, 1984

cial assistance as a result of the drought experienced last summer by farmers in many Quebec ridings. Following that meeting, the Minister of Agriculture said that he would be prepared to compensate those farmers, provided his provincial counterpart made an official request. On April 16 last, the Quebec Minister of Agriculture submitted an official request for federal Government assistance. In response, the federal Minister of Agriculture simply said that the request was worthless since his Quebec colleague did not make a cost-sharing proposal.

That, Mr. Speaker, is an unbelievably stupid joke on the part of certain Government Members who had promised financial aid to the Quebec UPA. Given the condition laid down by the Minister of Agriculture, Mr. Speaker, it was a stupid joke in the circumstances, and I urge the Minister and his Quebec colleagues to elicit an affirmative response from the federal Government, with generous aid, as was done for other regions of the country two or three years ago, and for the same reasons, Mr. Speaker.

That is why I insist and ask Members opposite to stop being such hypocrites when the basic needs of Quebec farmers are involved.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURE
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL AID PROMISED TO UPA BY CERTAIN LIBERAL MEMBERS
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

THE ECONOMY

PC

Martin Brian Mulroney (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Brian Mulroney (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Minister of Finance. The National Chairman of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association said yesterday that the recovery had turned "generally flat". According to Mr. German, the manufacturing sector had recovered only about 40 per cent of the 300,000 jobs that were lost during the recession. He said that the recovery is still "very hesitant, very uneven and very fragile". Does the Minister agree with the assessment made by the Chairman of the CMA? If so, will he be unveiling any new policies designed to meet this problem, particularly for the

550,000 young people who are out of work and who, it would appear, will be out of work for an extended period of time? Will the Minister be unveiling any new policies in light of this statement?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT BY CHAIRMAN OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION-REQUEST FOR NEW POLICIES
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LIB

Marc Lalonde (Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Hon. Marc Lalonde (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, I would first like to welcome the Leader of the Opposition back to the House after a long absence.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT BY CHAIRMAN OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION-REQUEST FOR NEW POLICIES
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May 30, 1984