May 25, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

FISHERIES

PC

Melbourne Alexander Gass

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Mel Gass (Malpeque):

Mr. Speaker, today I would like to bring to the attention of the House the problem faced by Prince Edward Island fishermen in obtaining crab licences. The crab fishery was established off the coast of Prince Edward Island in the early 1970s, but over the years Island fishermen lost their right to hold licences for crab. The P.E.I. fishermen and the provincial Department of Fisheries have tried, in vain, to obtain crab licences from the federal Department of Fisheries.

One month ago the Department of Fisheries on Prince Edward Island sent a telex to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans asking whether Prince Edward Island could receive inshore licences for Zone 7 off the coast of eastern P.E.I. should it be closed to the offshore crab fishery. They have not received a reply from the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, nor have they received an acknowledgement of their telex.

On May 15 the federal Government announced its management plan for the offshore crab fishery in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Under this plan it did close Zone 7 to the offshore crab fishery. P.E.I. fishermen are hoping that they will now be able to obtain inshore crab licences. It is certainly the right of Island fishermen to have the opportunity to fish crab, as the crab fishery was established on Prince Edward Island.

I urge the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans to realize the frustrations the Island fishermen feel, as fishermen from other provinces fish crab within eyesight of the shores of P.E.I., have good catches, land them on P.E.I. docks, load them onto their trucks, and transport them to other provinces for processing. Mr. Speaker, I insist that the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans award crab licences to Prince Edward Island fishermen.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FISHERIES
Sub-subtopic:   CRAB FISHING LICENCES SOUGHT FOR PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FISHERMEN
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THE MAGNA CARTA

LIB

Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, the occasion of the first display in Canada, at McMaster University art gallery in Hamilton, of one of the four handwritten copies of the Magna Carta, and the only one with King John's seal, provokes some thoughtful reflections. It was in 1215, almost 770 years ago, that King John signed the document that granted the King's subjects certain liberties, and which restrained the powers of the King himself within well defined limits.

The passage of the Magna Carta was a watershed event in the recognition of human rights. It originated at a time when the land was ruled by a feudal aristocracy. This document has become the most important single document in the development of constitutional and legal freedoms, not only in Britain but in many countries of the Commonwealth, and in the United States.

This great Charter of English liberties, granted under threat of civil war, is a symbol and a battle cry opposing oppression. Each successive generation has, in it, a protection of its own civil liberties. For this reason I would like to express the great honour which all Hamiltonians feel in being entrusted with this historic document for a period of two weeks.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE MAGNA CARTA
Sub-subtopic:   REFLECTIONS PROMPTED BY HAMILTON EXHIBITION
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PENITENTIARIES

PC

Gordon Edward Taylor

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gordon Taylor (Bow River):

Mr. Speaker, there is a move afoot by the bleeding hearts to amend the Canada Elections Act to permit prisoners in federal correctional institutions to vote.

Right now prisoners have a better life than hundreds of Canadians who are paying taxes. They have better food than those living on welfare, and even more choice than the workers in the below poverty jobs.

They have special trailers for conjugal visits of wives and even common-law wives, and now there is a rumour this will be extended to girl friends.

They have free medical and dental care, and access to guidance counsellors. They enjoy the best of pool tables, gymnasiums, and sports equipment. Scores of taxpayers do not enjoy such facilities and services. However, the bleeding hearts

May 25, 1984

want more privileges, including the vote. If this keeps up, the old concept of punishment will disappear entirely.

No one wants to go back to bread and water diets, or to breaking rocks, and everyone wants to encourage rehabilitation. However, reform does not come from catering to those who break the law but rather from a desire within the individual to live within the law.

Can you picture prisoners who broke the Elections Act, or who are in for treason, or rape and murder, making demands on the candidates? Would candidates in ridings with an institution population that could sway the vote have to go from cell to cell making promises?

The bleeding hearts had better give this matter much more consideration. After all, our correctional institutions must be places of punishment and not houses of pleasure.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARIES
Sub-subtopic:   INMATES' PRIVILEGES-OPPOSITION TO EXTENSION OF ELECTORAL FRANCHISE
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

NDP

Terence James (Terry) Sargeant

New Democratic Party

Mr. Terry Sargeant (Selkirk-Interlake):

Mr. Speaker, on May 1 some 2,500 students were kept out of schools on four Manitoba reserves to protest the very sorry state of affairs at those schools. Over 600 of those students have yet to return.

Whether or not one agrees with the tactics, there is no denying that, when compared to provincial schools, reserve schools are seriously underfunded. Unfortunately, the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (Mr. Munro) has not been giving this issue serious attention despite his nice sounding platitudes.

At the beginning of May the Minister agreed that their complaint was valid and promised to do something about it. He urged the chiefs to be patient and said that he would take their case to Cabinet as soon as possible. Three weeks passed, with no action.

Last Monday in Winnipeg, at a meeting with the four chiefs involved, the Minister gave his word to the chiefs that the submission for funding would go to Treasury Board on Tuesday. As of this morning that submission was still on the Minister's desk awaiting his approval before it could go to Treasury Board.

Indian students cannot wait for the Minister to squeeze their concerns into his leadership campaign schedule. If he cannot find the time to address these concerns he should resign and turn the Ministry over to someone with both the time and inclination to give Indian concerns the urgent attention they need.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   CLOSURE OF SCHOOLS ON MANITOBA RESERVES
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NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION

PC

Harvie Andre

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Harvie Andre (Calgary Centre):

Mr. Speaker, some months ago a Cabinet document prepared by the Department of National Defence came into my possession. This document clearly indicated that, given the state of the equipment available to Canada's Armed Forces and the funding levels projected by the Government, it would soon be, if it is not already, impossible for Canada to fulfill the stated defence policy objectives of the Government including, of course, our obligations under NATO.

It is an unflattering comment on the media in Canada that, when this document was released some weeks ago in Calgary, it attracted very little media attention, but when it was released in Washington, D.C., last Wednesday, it immediately became a matter of significant media attention in Canada. That, however, is an aside to my main point.

Questions based on this Cabinet document were put in the House yesterday by myself and my colleague, the Hon. Member for York-Peel (Mr. Stevens). It was quite evident that the thrust of our concern was that the Government was not honouring our commitment to NATO. One such commitment, for example, is our obligation to provide 20 warships to NATO, ten within 48 hours' notice. The Minister's own document indicates that we will have a 12-ship navy by 1990 and therefore would be unable to fulfill that NATO obligation.

It is hypocrisy to claim that we are fulfilling our obligation when we are not. Hypocrisy is the worst of all alternatives.

Canada is extremely well served by our Armed Forces whose excellence is proven each year through competitions with our NATO Allies. However, in this modern era it is essential that we provide these Forces with the necessary capital equipment to enable them to do the job that needs to be done. I repeat that we are committed to NATO. We are proud of the quality of the Canadian Armed Forces. We are disappointed and angry at the Government's failure to provide our Armed Services personnel with the equipment necessary for them to do the jobs asked of them.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION
Sub-subtopic:   ABILITY TO HONOUR CANADIAN COMMITMENT
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The Hon. Member's time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION
Sub-subtopic:   ABILITY TO HONOUR CANADIAN COMMITMENT
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AGRICULTURE

PC

Stanley Kenneth Schellenberger

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stan Schellenberger (Wetaskiwin):

Mr. Speaker, on May 16 the federal Government was asked to impose a temporary surtax on imported European beef and to consider a countervailing duty on this heavily subsidized product in order to protect Canadian farmers and meat workers in plants across the country.

The documentation is clear, and it is beyond dispute that the subsidized imports are doing material damage to the beef industry. Yet the Government is laying unreasonable obstacles

May 25, 1984

in the path of the Canadian beef industry. For example, the manner in which Revenue Canada officials seek to employ the GATT Agreement is retarding expeditious action. Provisions under the Agreement require the beef industry to prove that an export subsidy exists, and they must establish that there is injury to the industry. But the Government is not willing to help collect data on which to base a claim for countervailing duty. The Government is making this industry jump through unreasonable hoops to prove their case, when it is so evident that there is damage being done.

Why does the Government not introduce the appropriate countervailing duty immediately? If we were the Government we would not be dallying and twiddling our thumbs. We would be doing something about our once thriving beef industry in order that it can compete with the European Community.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURE
Sub-subtopic:   IMPACT OF BEEF IMPORTS
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NATIONAL FILM BOARD

NDP

Robert Joseph Ogle

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bob Ogle (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, the people of Saskatoon are very much afraid that the National Film Board office which has been there for the last 25 years or more is in danger of being closed this fall. The National Film Board has given excellent service to the city of Saskatoon as well as to all parts of northern Saskatchewan that are served from that city, including about 500,000 people. This office also serves the University of Saskatchewan, the school boards and senior citizens. A particular program has now been introduced by the National Film Board to help new Canadians become assimilated, to learn the language, and to find out about the country of Canada. It has had excellent success.

About a year ago the same fear arose that the office would close. At that time thousands of Saskatoon citizens by petitions, by letters, and by whatever means a citizen can use, appealed to the Minister to continue the centre. Fortunately the request was accepted and the office was given a one-year extension, but again the same fear is present. Therefore I am asking, in the name of the people of our region of Saskatoon and northern Saskatchewan, that the Minister seriously look at this again and that any extension not be limited but that there be a permanent commitment to have a National Film Board library in Saskatoon.

Oral Questions

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL FILM BOARD
Sub-subtopic:   THREATENED CLOSURE OF SASKATOON OFFICE
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ORAL QUESTIONS

CANADA SPORTS POOL CORPORATION

PC

John William Bosley

Progressive Conservative

Mr. John Bosley (Don Valley West):

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for whichever Minister is speaking for the Minister of State for Fitness and Amateur Sport in the House today. [Translation]

Today, the newspaper La Presse reported that the Canada Sports Pool Corporation gave advertising contracts to two agencies with very close links to the Liberal Party. MacLaren Advertising in Toronto was awarded the English contract and Planicom PNMD in Montreal or, more specifically, Mr. Jean Prevost, Vice-President of the Liberal Party, was awarded the French contract.

Mr. Speaker, lest we forget, Mr. Prevost is an old friend of the Minister of Finance and is also in charge of campaign advertising for John Turner, who said he was against the sports pool.

Are we supposed to believe this is another coincidence? Is the Government finally going to admit that the Canada Sports Pool Corporation is a hot bed of patronage?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADA SPORTS POOL CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   ISSUANCE OF ADVERTISING CONTRACTS
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LIB

Herbert Eser (Herb) Gray (President of the Treasury Board)

Liberal

Hon. Herb Gray (President of the Treasury Board):

Mr. Speaker, I should be glad to take the Hon. Member's questions as notice and submit them to the Minister of State for Fitness and Amateur Sport. However, Mr. Speaker, I do not think we can accept the Hon. Member's suggestion that we are not hiring competent people. Of course, it is competence that attracts orders in the private sector, and in the circumstances, I do not think politics has anything to do with it.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADA SPORTS POOL CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   ISSUANCE OF ADVERTISING CONTRACTS
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May 25, 1984