May 16, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

INDUSTRY

PC

Claude Girvin (Girve) Fretz

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Girve Fretz (Erie):

Mr. Speaker, it has come to my attention that yet another plant in my riding may be forced to shut down or lay off workers due to the loss of a market for its products. The company in question, Port Colborne Forgings, was informed recently that forgings from the company destined for use by the United States military would no longer be required as of May 24. This came about as a result of a directive issued by the American Government which indicated, essentially, that as of that date no defence contracts were to be let to companies outside the United States. This ruling affects a number of companies in Canada doing related work.

For the City of Port Colborne this sudden and arbitrary decision could mean the loss of another 25 jobs in a community already badly shaken by massive lay-offs at Inco. As their federal Member of Parliament I ask, on behalf of the company and the community, that officials from the Department of Regional Industrial Expansion and the Department of External Affairs take immediate action to ensure that this directive is softened or changed. By so doing, we could ensure that Canadian companies continue to be able to export products for the United States defence market, especially in light of the fact that we in this country are co-operating with our neighbours to the South in fulfilling our treaty obligations under NATO and NORAD.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
Sub-subtopic:   LOSS OF UNITED STATES MILITARY ORDER TO PORT COLBORNE PLANT
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

LIB

Marie Thérèse Rollande Killens

Liberal

Mrs. Therese Killens (Saint-Michel-Ahuntsic):

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to speak on the issue of Section 12(1 )(b) of the Indian Act. I urge the Government to proceed with its stated commitment to repeal this flagrant discriminatory provision. I know I speak for all women of Canada, and indeed for all women in the House regardless of party affiliations. We must

not be deterred from rectifying this long-standing historic wrong committed against Indian women. I call upon the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (Mr. Munro), and upon the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau), to follow through on this promise. I call upon them to act immediately to repeal Section 12(1 )(b) of the Indian Act.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   CALL FOR REPEAL OF LEGISLATION DISCRIMINATING AGAINST WOMEN
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HUMAN RIGHTS

PC

David Kilgour

Progressive Conservative

Mr. David Kilgour (Edmonton-Strathcona):

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week members of all Parties in the House took part in hearings on the dreadful situation of Soviet Jews. Quite simply, official anti-semitism has been raised to the level of state religion in a godless society.

First, of an estimated three million Jews in the Soviet Union, an estimated 400,000 have made at least an initial attempt to leave. In 1979, 51,000 were permitted to do so, but during 1983 only 1,344 were allowed.

Second, since the Soviet Union signed the Helsinki Agreement, which includes the right to emigrate, the situation of Soviet Jews has actually deteriorated. Applicants face arbitrary dismissal from work or university, persecution of their children, telephone disconnections, non-receipt of mail, separation of families, and the constant risk of imprisonment. We heard eloquent case histories on Tuesday about Vladimir Slepak, Iosif Begun, and others.

One obvious conclusion I reached was that Canada must have a more human rights oriented foreign policy. The case of human rights cannot be served anywhere by silence. We, as legislators, must show more courage and leadership to our fellow countrymen on this important issue in the future.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   U.S.S.R.-DENIAL OF EMIGRATION TO JEWS
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

LIB

John O. (Jack) Burghardt (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Communications)

Liberal

Mr. Jack Burghardt (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Communications):

Mr. Speaker, today in Edmonton the Assembly of First Nations is meeting with the Native Women's Association of Canada to discuss a most discriminatory Section of the Indian Act, namely, Section 12(l)(b). Mention has been made of this particular Section already today.

May 16, 1984

As Chairman of the Subcommittee on Indian Women and the Indian Act, it is of great concern to me that changes to this Section of the Indian Act might not be forthcoming as a result of disagreements among various Indian organizations.

Section 12(1 )(b) legalizes discrimination, and it must be changed. It has caused pain and suffering for many Indian women who have lost their Indian status upon marrying non-Indians. These women and their children have been separated from their families, forced to leave their homes on reserves, and have lost all benefits accorded to our native people.

It is my hope that these differences will be resolved, and that legislation will be forthcoming to correct this most unjust treatment of Canada's native women.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   DISAGREEMENT AMONG NATIVE ORGAN IZATIONS ON WOMEN'S RIGHTS
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FINANCE

NDP

Nelson Andrew Riis

New Democratic Party

Mr. Nelson A. Riis (Kamloops-Shuswap):

Mr. Speaker, in an effort to reduce the federal deficit, two approaches have apparently been overlooked by the Liberals and the Conservatives. One reason we have such a large deficit is because we offer billions of dollars in grants each year to domestic and foreign corporations operating in Canada. For example, is it not time to ask whether it is necessary to give out billions of dollars in bribes to oil companies to entice them to explore for oil and gas in our frontier areas? PIP grants are corporate financial hand-outs on a scale not found anywhere else in the world. Is it not time to stop this corporate giveaway madness?

If we hope to reduce the deficit, why not collect taxes which are rightfully due to the federal coffers? The billions of dollars of deferred corporate taxes virtually equal the federal deficit. If we had a fair tax system where every individual and every corporation paid their fair share of taxes, our deficit would be virtually eliminated. Therefore, if we are genuinely concerned about the deficit situation facing Canadians, let us stop the corporate welfare system and close tax loopholes, rather than raise personal income taxes and eliminate the universality of social programs.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   CORPORATE TAX SYSTEM
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POLITICAL PARTIES

PC

Douglas Grinslade Lewis

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Doug Lewis (Simcoe North):

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, March 23, 1984, I read to the House excerpts from a letter which we thought had been written by Bob Nixon, former Leader of the Ontario Liberal Party, to John Turner. The House will remember that the letter referred to the fact that turn around Turner had quit as an MP and had gone on to notoriety and fortune as a Bay Street lawyer. The letter also referred to turn around Turner's lack of familiarity with

modern media techniques. The letter did not refer to his support for Bill 101 in Quebec. That came later, followed by the usual clarifications.

Mr. Nixon has since written to me to deny writing the letter. We do not know who would write such a letter, but MPs from ridings such as Trinity and Kitchener would probably suspect one of Jimmy Coutts' backroom operators. In any event, Mr. Nixon did not write the letter and I want to dispel any rumour that he, along with most provincial Liberals, is annoyed at turn around Turner for quitting in the middle of the 1975 Ontario election campaign. The fact that Mr. Nixon is supporting the Minister of Energy (Mr. Chretien) rather than turn around Turner in the leadership campaign is, of course, coincidental.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Sub-subtopic:   LIBERAL PARTY LEADERSHIP CAMPAIGN
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CANADA POST CORPORATION

PC

Walter Leland Rutherford (Lee) Clark

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Clark (Brandon-Souris):

Mr. Speaker, the Town Council of Souris in my constituency recently passed a resolution calling on the Canada Post Corporation to "institute a less discriminatory system of mail delivery in smaller centres". This resolution was brought about, in part, by the representations of a local resident, Mr. Bert Smith, who has for some time been making a strong case against the levying of rental charges for post office boxes in small communities.

The people of Souris, along with citizens of other small communities, feel they are being discriminated against by Canada Post. Unlike the residents of larger communities, they do not enjoy free home mail delivery; instead, they have to make their way to the post office to pick up their mail from post office boxes for which they must pay rent. The President of Canada Post recently explained to me in writing that those who rent post office boxes in small towns are buying a service which is beyond the so-called basic Canada Post service. I find that explanation difficult to accept.

The bottom line is that home delivery is preferable by most people's standards, and it is free, while picking up one's mail at a post office box is far less convenient and it costs money. I ask the Minister responsible for Canada Post to abolish post office box rental fees in small communities in order to rectify what is now very clearly an inequitable situation.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA POST CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   POST OFFICE BOX RENTAL CHARGES IN SMALL COMMUNITIES
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VIA RAIL

NDP

Victor Fredrich (Vic) Althouse

New Democratic Party

Mr. Vic Althouse (Humboldt-Lake Centre):

Mr. Speaker, after nearly two years' absence VIA Rail service is going to be re-established between Winnipeg, Melville, Saskatoon, and Edmonton on June 3. The Town of Raymore, along with the support of a great many surrounding towns and villages, has proposed to VIA Rail that Raymore be declared a flag stop for those passengers who want to go east to Melville or beyond, or

May 16, 1984

west to Saskatoon or beyond. Since tickets have to be purchased in advance, computer notification to the engine crew would not be a problem.

Raymore is a point through which a lot of bus traffic passes each day. The users of the bus tend to be the same clientele who would use the train, except that they prefer to use trains for extended voyages. The connection and timing of the current bus schedule and the proposed train schedule are close enough to make Raymore a logical connection point between the two transportation modes.

Bus passengers from a collection area as far away as Nor-quay, Hudson Bay, Melfort, Tisdale, Watson, Wynyard, Wadena and points in between, come through Raymore and would have access to VIA Rail if their application currently before the CTC is accepted. I urge the Minister of Transport (Mr. Axworthy) to look with approval at this sensible proposal for an inter-modal connection at Raymore in order that service to the residents of communities in the Raymore passenger service area be improved.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   VIA RAIL
Sub-subtopic:   PROPOSAL TO DECLARE FLAG STOP AT RAYMORE, SASK.
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FINANCE

IND

William J. Yurko

Independent

Mr. Bill Yurko (Edmonton East):

Mr. Speaker, the home owners of Canada need a break. The home owners are the only property owners in Canada who cannot deduct property taxes paid to a municipal Government from income, for calculating both the federal and provincial income taxes. This is unfair. This is not equitable. This taxing practice is unjust. This must be changed so that no taxpayer in Canada will be forced to pay income taxes on municipal taxes paid. Surely it is unjust to classify municipal taxes paid on home ownership as income for both federal and provincial income tax purposes.

The next federal Government, whatever its political colour, should make property taxes paid on the principal place of residence deductible when calculating income tax. To provide fairness between home owners, a maximum limit of $500, or even up to $1,000, may be placed on such deductions.

If the federal Government does not have the sense of justice to do this, I would then call on the provincial Governments to lead the way and provide deductibility when calculating provincial income taxes. Indeed, I urge and challenge the provincial Government of Alberta to lead the way toward fairness and justice in this regard.

Oral Questions

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED TAX DEDUCTIBILITY SCHEME FOR HOME OWNERS
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

May 16, 1984