May 11, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

LABOUR CONDITIONS

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker the appalling performance of the Liberal Government is not without its root causes. Those Canadians desperately seeking non existent jobs know what to blame. It is the Liberal zero growth policy. It is the Liberal high interest rate policy. It is the Liberal anti-investment policy, and the Liberal lack of concern for economic and job related issues.

Today's Statistics Canada figures speak for themselves. Our unemployment rate remains at 11.4 per cent, in comparison with only 7.8 per cent in the United States. Last month youth unemployment increased from 18.2 per cent to 18.5 per cent. The number of long-term unemployed is now double what it was three years ago.

Canadians have a right to expect a better deal from their Government. They know that neither the Liberals nor the NDP can deliver jobs. Therefore, let us bring on an election and change to a Conservative Government dedicated to high rates of permanent employment right across the nation.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APRIL UNEMPLOYMENT STATISTICS
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EMPLOYMENT

LIB

Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, last autumn the Government of Canada consolidated its 12 existing job-creation programs into four. This was a welcome move in that it made it much easier to keep track of the programs and to advise constituents. However, one aspect of this consolidation has led to complaints from a number of my constituents at McMaster University. This is in relation to the change in rules between last summer and this summer in what was called the Summer Canada Student Internship Program. The corresponding program this year is called Summer Career Access.

The problem has occurred with those programs which were approved in principle last summer for three years funding with

the understanding that the same students would be hired for three consecutive summers, allowing training at a higher level each year. However, with the program change, instead of the Government paying the students' full wage, only 50 per cent of the wages will be paid up to a maximum of $3 per hour for a 40-hour week. In addition, for charitable or non-profit employers, another $80 per week will be allocated per student for additional costs such as OHIP, et cetera.

For projects which were approved in principle for three years, the rules have been changed. This has jeopardized a number of student jobs because the universities were not able to budget for the difference in the wage subsidies. I would therefore recommend that the Government provide a special supplement to these projects which were approved in principle for three years' funding last year so that 100 per cent of the students' wages will be covered until the end of those three-year projects.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT
Sub-subtopic:   SUMMER CAREER ACCESS PROGRAM-CHANGE IN FUNDING
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HOUSING

PC

Thomas Scott Fennell

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Scott Fennell (Ontario):

Mr. Speaker, according to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, housing starts in most Canadian cities posted a significant slow-down during the first third of this year. On a national basis, housing starts fell for the second straight month in April. According to the director of statistics for CMHC, many housing experts have trimmed a few thousands starts from their housing forecasts for 1984.

With the bank rate the highest it has been in two years, and going up, and mortgage rates following, the situation in the housing industry is becoming critical. The proposed increase in the federal sales tax on building materials scheduled for October is only going to exacerbate the problem and cause more lost jobs.

Economists are predicting another recession by the end of this year, or at least by the beginning of 1985. If we go into another recession with 1.5 million people unemployed, it will have a traumatic effect on the average Canadian household. We need to help the people of Canada by keeping mortgage rates at an affordable level. This in turn will help those people in the construction industry because they will have jobs and will be able to go to work every morning.

May 11, 1984

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HOUSING
Sub-subtopic:   DECLINE IN NUMBER OF STARTS
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PENITENTIARIES

NDP

James Ross Fulton

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jim Fulton (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian public has become the unwilling participant in penal therapy experiments that allow axe murderers and sex killers to roam the streets on so-called day passes. For the second time this week a dangerous inmate has escaped custody. This time Giovanni Fasciano walked away from an unarmed social therapist while strolling down a Montreal street. Fasciano has a history of attempted escapes. In fact three years ago, following his first escape, hospital officials described him as a dangerous schizophrenic.

The questions which must be answered by the House are simple. One, why was the inmate allowed outside the hospital without wearing manacles or other restraining devices? Two, why was his attendant not armed? Three, why bother providing extensive security in a jail or hospital for the criminally insane if prisoners are to be turned loose on the streets?

[DOT] (i HO)

These two incidents have given all Canadians reason to question the fundamental ability of our prison security system to do its job. It is hard to imagine any justification for allowing day passes to such violent and escape-prone inmates.

It is sheer lunacy to allow such prisoners on the street without security measures that are at least comparable to those of the institutions housing the inmates.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARIES
Sub-subtopic:   ESCAPE OF DANGEROUS INMATES WHILE RELEASED ON DAY PASSES
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EDUCATION

PC

Walter Leland Rutherford (Lee) Clark

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Clark (Brandon-Souris):

Mr. Speaker, all too often in recent years Canadians, as a result of increasing urbanization, have come to assume that the good life was to be found only in the larger cities. One of the unfortunate results of this pro big city attitude was the development of a prevailing philosophy that excellence too was synonymous with such large urban centres and, as a result, many young people, often with their parents' encouragement, have migrated from our smaller western communities in order to secure what they believe to be a superior education.

Many of us who were educated primarily in the smaller western communities, many of us who taught in the educational institutions located in such centres, and many of us who, as parents, have encouraged our own children to remain at home for their education, have always denied that bigger necessarily means better. Those of us of that mind are particularly delighted to hear that a national academic competition, the "Reach for the Top" program, has been won by a high school which has an enrolment of only 212 students in its Grade 7 to Grade 12 program, and which is located in a smaller Manitoba

community with a population of approximately 1,100 residents.

The students of Deloraine Collegiate have proven without doubt that educational institutions need not be large nor need they be located in large urban centres in order to be of a superior quality.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   EDUCATION
Sub-subtopic:   NATIONAL ACADEMIC COMPETITION WON BY MANITOBA HIGH SCHOOL
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HUMAN RIGHTS

PC

Sinclair McKnight Stevens

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Sinclair Stevens (Vork-Peel):

Mr. Speaker, it is time that this House reconsider the Armenian question. You will recall that on March 27, 1980, the Legislature of Ontario unanimously adopted a resolution that said in part that, on behalf of the people of Ontario, that Legislature "requests the Government of Canada to officially recognize and condemn the atrocities committed by the Government of Turkey upon the Armenian people who were victims of persecution and genocide during World War I."

The Legislature of Ontario also stated, on behalf of the people of Ontario, that it urged the Government of Canada "to make appropriate representations to the General Assembly of the United Nations to recognize and condemn the Armenian genocide and to express abhorrence of such actions as being in violation of the basic standards of human rights and decency now embodied in the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights."

The Ontario Legislature, on behalf of the people of Ontario, also recommended to the Government of Canada "that it designate April 24 in every year hereafter throughout Canada as a day of remembrance for the Armenian community, as it has been by the Armenian people for many years in memory of fellow Armenians who suffered such crimes."

A similar resolution was passed on April 10 in the National Assembly in Quebec.

We should act.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   ARMENIAN MASSACRE-SUGGESTED DECLARATION OF DAY OF REMEMBRANCE
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. The Hon. Member's time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   ARMENIAN MASSACRE-SUGGESTED DECLARATION OF DAY OF REMEMBRANCE
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IMMIGRATION

NDP

Daniel James Macdonnell Heap

New Democratic Party

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

Mr. Speaker, Canada's immigration policy is losing some of its humanitarian principles through administrative decisions that erode the intent of our immigration law and regulations.

On June 29, 1983, the former Minister of Employment and Immigration promised to have a review and report by the fall on the concept of the family as used by his Department. It had been found that our rules were often being so interpreted as to exclude people whose close family ties are all here in Canada.

May 11, 1984

In particular, there are cases of one family member remaining in the old country who wishes to be reunited with the family here. The guidelines were intended to authorize and encourage immigration officers to give favourable treatment to such a last remaining family member who is financially or emotionally dependent on the rest of the family in Canada.

While we wait for the report, which was promised almost a year ago, the immigration officials continue to tighten the restrictions that they apply when interpreting these guidelines. They are causing severe personal hardship in a number of cases that have come to my attention, and they are departing from the humanitarian principles of our immigration legislation and policy.

I understand that officials of the Department have indeed been studying this issue and have in fact prepared a draft for the Minister, with recommendations which would improve the situation for these immigrants. Therefore I call upon the Minister to expedite this report, the report promised nearly a year ago-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION
Sub-subtopic:   GUIDELINES AFFECTING REUNIFICATION OF FAMILIES
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The Hon. Member's time has expired. The Hon. Member for Red Deer.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION
Sub-subtopic:   GUIDELINES AFFECTING REUNIFICATION OF FAMILIES
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THE ECONOMY

PC

Thomas Gordon Towers

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gordon Towers (Red Deer):

Mr. Speaker, in 1968 the Canadian unemployment total was 351,000, or 4.5 per cent. Now it is 1,399,000, or 11.4 per cent. The unemployment rate for youth was 7.4 per cent and is now 18.2 per cent, up a whopping 10.8 percentage points, Mr. Speaker. In 1968 unem-ploymnent insurance costs were $438 million. Now they are $10,169 million, up 2,222 per cent. Since 1968 the purchasing power of the dollar has dropped to 31 cents, a minus 69 per cent. Interest rates have soared, and five-year mortgages have increased from 9.25 per cent to 13.25 per cent, and now will go higher.

In the past 16 years the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau), the Hon. John Turner, the Hon. Don MacDonald, the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (Mr. Chretien), and the Minister of Finance (Mr. Lalonde), have all been Finance Minister, in charge of the economy and the public purse. In that time the Government sector has mushroomed and unemployment has quadrupled. Prices have increased several times. If the Hon. John Turner had so many good ideas, why did he let the Liberals get into such a mess? He was the start of it all.

The Prime Minister also did the Canadian public a great disservice by delaying his departure until such time as an election could not be held before July 1, the Queen's visit and Pope John Paul's visit. With a June election, the economic mess could have at least-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Sub-subtopic:   CONDEMNATION OF GOVERNMENT'S RECORD
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The Hon. Member's time has expired.

Oral Questions

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Sub-subtopic:   CONDEMNATION OF GOVERNMENT'S RECORD
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May 11, 1984