March 30, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

TOURISM

PC

Stan Darling

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stan Darling (Parry Sound-Muskoka):

Mr. Speaker, I want to stress the importance of the domino effect of tourist dollars, and 1 wish to appeal to the House for support in bolstering the ailing tourist industry.

The dismal economic forecast is likely to have a detrimental effect on tourism this year. A large percentage of the population in my riding depends on tourism to keep bread on their tables. I believe it is crucial to recirculate tax dollars back into the tourism industry to fight unemployment through job creation.

rence and Gaspe regions. With this contribution, which will be in the form of professional and technical, as well as financial assistance, the Canadian Government has shown its awareness of the fact that forests are a major natural resource and a necessary source of income for our region's producers and workers in the forestry sector. Under this program, farmers who also own private woodlots will be able to go to the Environment Canada office in Rimouski and receive any services they need for woodlot improvement.

On my own behalf and on behalf of owners of private woodlots in the Lower St. Lawrence and Gaspe regions, I want to thank the Government for doing its share to develop the forestry industry in our region, an industry that has suffered severe damage in recent years as a result of the spruce budworm epidemic.

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Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   TOURISM
Sub-subtopic:   IMPORTANCE TO ECONOMY
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AIR SAFETY


The injection of funds into tourism invariably results in a highly desirable domino effect whereby all sectors of society may benefit. A strong tourist area is usually accompanied by healthy cottage and tertiary industries which may be unrelated to tourism. We must regard tourism as an investment in the future of this country. It is an underdeveloped resource at this point and, so long as this is the case, Canadians will continue to miss the boat. Obviously, escalation of the tourist industry will create widespread employment and revenue. We already have the natural resources. What we need most is a Government capable of capitalizing on what God has given to all of us.


FORESTRY

LIB

Eva Lachance Côté (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mrs. Eva Cote (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport):

Mr. Speaker, I may remind the House that last Friday, in Rimouski and New Richmond, the federal Minister of the Environment (Mr. Caccia) announced a $19 million forestry program. The purpose of this program is reforestation and improvement of private woodlots in the Lower St. Law-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FORESTRY
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNMENT'S PARTICIPATION IN FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT
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PC

Geoffrey Douglas Scott

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Geoff Scott (Hamilton-Wentworth):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to express a purely personal opinion on a matter which has concerned me for some time, namely, smoking on commercial aircraft. During several recent flights I have discussed at length, with air crews of both Air Canada and CP Air, the hazards they face from smoking.

The staggered smoking and non smoking sections on the average commercial airliner are a joke. Most aircraft ventilation systems blow sidestream smoke all over the place and make life miserable for those in border line rows near the smoking sections.

Of far greater concern to flight attendants are the people who have a few drinks, fall asleep, and drop lighted cigarettes on scattered newspapers or on the upholstery. Such incidents have the potential of turning the most sophisticated airliner into a flying inferno, 35,000 feet up. Ground fires on aircraft, as we have seen, can be just as devastating.

Smoking is a luxury. On commercial airliners it is a very dangerous luxury.

While we can do nothing about long haul international flights, we can protect passengers and flight attendants from the annoyance and dangers of smoking on domestic airlines.

Even as a pipe smoker, my own personal desire would be to ban all smoking on domestic commercial airliners in Canada. Since that proposition raises all kinds of questions, such as the effectiveness of smoke detectors in washrooms, I want to see

March 30, 1984

this issue ventilated through a full public hearing by the Canadian Transport Commission.

Surely lives are more important than the luxury of lighting up on Canadian airlines.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FORESTRY
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNMENT'S PARTICIPATION IN FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT
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LABOUR RELATIONS

NDP

Nelson Andrew Riis

New Democratic Party

Mr. Nelson A. Riis (Kamloops-Shuswap):

Mr. Speaker, the Davis-Bacon Act in the United States of America establishes a federal fair wage guideline for all federal Government construction projects. In Canada we also have a federal fair wage guideline that accompanies most federal Government contracts. There is some question whether these federal fair wage guidelines are being followed by certain contractors and their sub-contractors on major federal construction projects. For example, with the federal Government's armoury construction contract in Kamloops there have been suggestions that perhaps the federal fair wage guidelines are not being followed.

Since many of these federal contracts have been awarded to non-union contractors, it is very important that Labour Canada ensures that these guidelines are being adhered to. These guidelines are the only real protection that workers on these sites have to ensure that they receive a fair and equitable wage. Therefore I urge the Government to take whatever action is necessary to monitor federal projects in an effort to ensure contract compliance with federal fair wage guidelines.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   LABOUR RELATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   FAIR WAGE GUIDELINES-APPLICATION TO KAMLOOPS ARMOURY CONTRACT
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NATIONAL REVENUE

PC

John Horton McDermid

Progressive Conservative

Mr. John McDermid (Brampton-Georgetown):

Mr. Speaker, the Progressive Conservative Task Force on Revenue Canada has completed its cross-Canada hearings. People from all walks of life made representation to the members of the Task Force, most capably chaired by my colleague, the Hon. Member for Wellington-Dufferin-Simcoe (Mr. Beatty), and all Canadians owe this Task Force a debt of gratitude.

Constituents of mine, Lou and Doris Kannon, bravely appeared before the Task Force and told their story of the tax Department presently threatening them with seizure of their property if they missed another payment of S700 a month. In 1980, Lou Kannon was in a coma after a serious fall, and the tax Department demanded $4,300 in taxes. The family contacted me early in 1981 and arrangements were made to pay $400 a month, plus a cash payment of $1,000 to Revenue Canada.

Because of health problems, a payment was missed. Then Revenue Canada demanded $700 a month payments. While Mr. Kannon is just now back at work, it was impossible to

meet last month's payment on time. Then there was the threat of seizing their property, the last thing they have besides each other. Lo and behold, after their appearance before the Task Force, officials of Revenue Canada are now willing to sit down and negotiate a realistic repayment schedule.

The Progressive Conservative Task Force on Revenue Canada made the point loud and clear that this harassing must stop, and humane and fair treatment must be the watchword of Revenue Canada. Could this action mean they are starting to listen? For the sake of all Canadians, I hope so.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL REVENUE
Sub-subtopic:   PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE PARTY TASK FORCE HEARINGS
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

LIB

André Maltais

Liberal

Mr. Andre Maltais (Manicouagan):

On several occasions, Mr. Speaker, I have risen in the House to censure the Province of Newfoundland for denying native people in the Labrador region of Quebec the right to go fishing, trapping and hunting in the Labrador region of Newfoundland. Time and again the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development has made representations to the Newfoundland Government to make sure that the rights of native people would be respected in Newfoundland's Labrador region.

Bearing in mind that negotiations have repeatedly ended in a stalemate, very soon I will join the Quebec Montagnais and Naskapis of the Labrador region and march on Newfoundland territory to uphold their right to trap and fish in that province's Labrador territory.

Mr. Speaker, I would suggest that a show of solidarity is needed so that at long last the Indians will be free to live according to their traditions in those northern reaches of Quebec and Newfoundland. Since Newfoundland has so far turned a deaf ear, as Member for Manicouagan representing those people, I will march right along with them on Newfoundland territory to show peacefully that Indians do have rights which must be respected throughout Canada and that the Government of Newfoundland is ill advised to prevent them from living in accordance with Amerindian customs.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   INDIAN RIGHTS IN LABRADOR
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MEDICAL CARE

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, over wide areas of Canada's North, medical services in the settlements are provided by nurses in the employ of the Department of National Health and Welfare. The dedication and hard work of these nurses are to be applauded as they have been responsible for upgrading community health standards for many years. Since these nurses work alone without direct

March 30, 1984

supervision from doctors, the nearest of whom may be located hundreds of miles distant, it is imperative that they be highly trained, not only in southern nursing practices techniques but also in fields such as diagnosis, drug prescription, X-ray interpretation, midwifery, and how to cope with emergencies of many kinds.

The nurse-practitioner program at the University of Alberta provided training in these needed skills, and nurses from remote areas learned much of great value to them and, as a result, saved many lives and reduced considerable suffering. It therefore comes as complete shock to find that Health and Welfare is discontinuing its support of the nurse-practitioner program. While the Liberal Government has millions of dollars to spend on imposing official bilingualism in the North, how, Sir, can it be so callous as to cut out the training programs for nurses who serve in an area where the infant mortality rate, for instance, is nearly double the national average?

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MEDICAL CARE
Sub-subtopic:   NURSING SERVICES IN NORTHERN COMMUNITIES
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

1 must interrupt the Hon. Member. His time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MEDICAL CARE
Sub-subtopic:   NURSING SERVICES IN NORTHERN COMMUNITIES
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

NATIONAL REVENUE

PC

Henry Perrin Beatty

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Perrin Beatty (Wellington-Dufferin-Simcoe):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we saw the disgraceful and cowardly spectacle of the Government sacking the Deputy Minister of National Revenue in the hope of distracting attention from the complete abdication of responsibility of the Minister. In view of the fact that the Minister of National Revenue refused pointedly on seven separate occasions in one day during Question Period in the House of Commons to back his Deputy Minister, will he deal honestly with Members of the House of Commons now and tell us in a straightforward way what was his recommendation to the Prime Minister? Did he recommend the transfer of his Deputy Minister?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   NATIONAL REVENUE
Sub-subtopic:   REASSIGNMENT OF DEPUTY MINISTER
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March 30, 1984