March 16, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

BOY SCOUTS OF CANADA

LIB

Robert Mose Patrick Daudlin

Liberal

Mr. Robert Daudlin (Essex-Kent):

Mr. Speaker, this morning several young Canadians attended in the precincts of this House and obtained their gold and silver citizenship awards in a ceremony that was rather impressive to all who saw it. That they come from the Fourth Leamington Scout Troop is, of course, important to me, but I think they represent the best of what scouting stands for in all of Canada. This is something I am sure is important to all of us in this House.

Their leadership demonstrates that voluntarism is alive and well in Canada, and that we as Canadians can conclude from these achievements that a bright future lies ahead for Canada as a result of what they have achieved and of what the volunteers who are behind them have allowed them to achieve.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   BOY SCOUTS OF CANADA
Sub-subtopic:   FOURTH LEAMINGTON SCOUT TROOP-PRESENTATION OF CITIZENSHIP AWARDS
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PENITENTIARIES

PC

Walter Franklin McLean

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Walter McLean (Waterloo):

Mr. Speaker, last year the Solicitor General (Mr. Kaplan) announced that he was terminating innovative educational programs offered in nine federal penitentiaries by four Canadian universities. These programs were of proven worth since only 14 per cent of prison students become repeat offenders, compared to 52 per cent of all prisoners.

Following sustained pressure from Members in all Parties in the House, the Minister reversed his decision and announced he would reinstate the program. However, the Minister's policy on the reinstated program is subverting its goals. He called for bids from universities over the Christmas period, giving them from three to seven weeks to bid for a three-year contract. The main obstacle, however, to an adequate reimplementation of the program is the Minister's insistence on charging fees for the inmates. On the surface, $40 per course does not seem much, but when prisoners earn $3 a day and have to pay for toothpaste and other personal items out of this,

it is a lot of money. Not surprisingly, the correctional service is experiencing difficulties in working out arrangements with universities. These difficulties are so great that one official from correctional services recently suggested to the University of Victoria that it sub-contract the first two years of its program to a community college whose courses are free to inmates.

I urge the Solicitor General to re-think his misguided attitude toward the reinstatement of these valuable and cost-effective courses.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARIES
Sub-subtopic:   INMATE UNIVERSITY EDUCATION PROGRAM
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MEDICAL CARE

LIB

Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. Stanley Hudecki (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, a serious problem is developing in licensing foreign trained medical doctors to practise in Canada.

The foreign trained doctors to whom 1 am referring fell into two categories. The first consists of Canadian citizens who were not accepted at Canadian medical schools and received medical training in foreign medical schools.

The second category is composed of foreign born doctors who have fled hostile environments and have received landed immigrant status. In southern Ontario alone there are approximately 600 such doctors, with an estimated 100 coming from Poland. Not all of these are in the refugee class. While most of these doctors have successfully completed the Medical Council of Canada's evaluating examinations, the shortage of residency training facilities seriously impedes their chances of completing their internship requirements to qualify for licensing examinations.

I urge the Provincial Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons and the Medical Council of Canada to initiate whatever measures are necessary to solve this problem so that these foreign trained physicians can commence work in their chosen profession.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MEDICAL CARE
Sub-subtopic:   LICENSING OF FOREIGN TRAINED DOCTORS
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PARLIAMENT OF CANADA

PC

Howard Edward Crosby

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Howard Crosby (Halifax West):

Mr. Speaker, what standard governs the public and private affairs and activities of a parliamentarian who holds a seat in the House of Cornsous-32

March 16, 1984

mons or the Senate of Canada? Our new Constitution Act and the Statutes of Parliament offer no real guidance. Indeed, those few obligations that are imposed are couched in language best described as vague and uncertain.

The responsibility for the absence of a clear code of conduct must be borne by parliamentarians, past and present. Yet circumstances are continually arising in which individual parliamentarians must assess their own actions to determine whether they have violated any recognized standard of behaviour.

The process of personal self assessment is difficult for anyone, but for an elected representative sworn to perform parliamentary duties it is a nearly impossible task. Only vague legislative provisions and obscure historic precedents are present as guides. The answer to questions of personal conduct can only be found in the heart and soul of the person who examines his or her own conscience.

It is in that context that Canadians should consider the decision of the Hon. Member for Scarborough East (Mr. Gilchrist) to resign from the House of Commons. I am certain no code of conduct, however strict, enacted by Parliament, would ever require a Member of the House of Commons to resign while judicial proceedings were pending and the verdict not finalized. Nonetheless, the Hon. Member for Scarborough East has imposed upon himself a higher standard of conduct, one dictated by his own conscience and not imposed by any legal authority. No one has the right to stand in judgment on another but, if judgment is rendered, it must be that our colleague acknowledged a higher command-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Sub-subtopic:   ABSENCE OF CODE OF CONDUCT FOR PARLIAMENTARIANS
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to interrupt the Hon. Member, but his allotted time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Sub-subtopic:   ABSENCE OF CODE OF CONDUCT FOR PARLIAMENTARIANS
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DISARMAMENT

NDP

Pauline Jewett

New Democratic Party

Ms. Pauline Jewett (New Westminster-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, Hon. Members of the House should be aware that a country-wide peace petition campaign has been officially launched. Called the Peace Petition Caravan Campaign, organizers and thousands of participants hope to impress upon Hon. Members, upon candidates for the next federal election, and upon the three political Parties, the urgency of ending the arms race and the critical need to end Canada's participation in it.

The campaign has four stated goals-no Cruise testing, declaration of Canada as a nuclear weapons-free zone, conversion of arms industries to other industrial production, and a free vote in Parliament on those issues.

It is a pleasure to tell Hon. Members of the House and concerned Canadians working for the Peace Petition Caravan that all of us in the New Democratic Party support the

campaign and heartily endorse its four goals. In fact, we have been working toward the same goals and publicly advocating them for some time.

In the House it has been the NDP which has twice brought forward motions for no Cruise testing in Canada, motions defeated by the combined opposition of the other two Parties. We have raised, time and again, questions about Cruise testing, and we have brought forward Private Members' Bills to declare Canada a nuclear weapons-free zone. All of us, and all NDP candidates for the next federal election, support the goals of the Peace Petition Caravan Campaign. I urge other Members and other Parties to do the same.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT
Sub-subtopic:   PEACE PETITION CARAVAN CAMPAIGN
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THE ECONOMY

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, the chickens of the Minister of Finance (Mr. Lalonde) are coming home to roost. His February Budget did nothing to restore confidence in the ability of the Government to run the financial affairs of Canada which, I might remind the House, have been on a downhill skid ever since the days of John Turner.

The Grit ruse of using the recession to disguise its failure to address the underlying cause of high interest rates and inflation, is ended. Today's prime rate of 11.5 per cent, up half a per cent as a result of increases in the bank rate yesterday, foreshadow higher mortgage rates and a consequent decline in residential construction and industrial activity.

Canada is bleeding foreign reserves in a vain attempt to prop up a sick dollar and an even sicker Liberal popularity. Inflation is up again-last month at an annualized rate of over 7 per cent-giving the lie to the Liberal six and five program. How much longer must we tolerate this nonsense? We must have an election, and we must have it now.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Sub-subtopic:   CONDEMNATION OF GOVERNMENT POLICIES
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AIRPORTS

PC

Geoffrey Douglas Scott

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Geoff Scott (Hamilton-Wentworth):

Mr. Speaker, once again I wish to draw to the attention of the House the problems of Hamilton Civic Airport. For those Hon. Members who may not instantly recall the runway configurations at Mount Hope, let me outline what is happening as a result of the airport's expansion. Expansion is not the issue. All of us in the greater Hamilton area welcome the upgrading of our dilapidated airport to first-class regional status.

What concerns me and my constituents is the financial hardship this construction is causing members of the Hamilton Flying Club. This club was established in 1928 and is already having trouble keeping its head above water, or above the clouds, as the case may be.

March 16, 1984

Regional officials of Transport Canada decided to close down the main runways 6 and 24 for four months beginning June 1, 1984. In addition, Transport Canada is closing down the east-west runway. It is runway 24 that the northwest winds favour during the summer months, and that is the peak period for pilot training at Hamilton Civic Airport.

Transport Canada is demanding extra ramp charges and rentals for buildings at the airport, in keeping with the Department's policy when airport development is proceeding. In my view this is highly premature and unfair. Surely Transport Canada should not be trying to kill all flying operations during improvements which benefit the entire Hamilton region. Surely the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (Mr. Munro), who is aware of the situation, could consult with his colleague, the Minister of Transport (Mr. Axworthy), somewhere along the campaign trail-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   AIRPORTS
Sub-subtopic:   HAMILTON CIVIC AIRPORT-EFFECT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK ON HAMILTON FLYING CLUB
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to interrupt the Hon. Member, but his allotted time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   AIRPORTS
Sub-subtopic:   HAMILTON CIVIC AIRPORT-EFFECT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK ON HAMILTON FLYING CLUB
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FISHERIES

NDP

James Douglas Manly

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jim Manly (Cowichan-Malahat-The Islands):

Mr. Speaker, our Party and everyone else concerned about the West Coast fishery have been very skeptical about the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans (Mr. De Bane) and his policy of trading off fish habitat in one area for so-called enhancement in another. On December 20 the Minister assured the House that there would be a public process whereby all sectors would have the opportunity to put forward their views.

Last week the Department approved one of these trade-offs in the Cowichan area. There was no public process to hear the views of local people or of their elected representatives. They could not even get information about what was happening. Under the agreement, Doman Industries Limited gained the right to store logs on an increased area of the estuary, an action that will adversely affect fish habitat. In exchange it has dedicated 23 acres of farmland for habitat. This will be dyked at public expense, and Doman retains the right to pasture cows in the area.

Trading part of the estuary for a cow pasture cannot be described as no-net loss of fish habitat. It is a sellout of a public resource to private interests. I call on the Minister to reverse this so-called no-net loss policy, and to protect fish habitat so that we will continue to have a fisheries resource on the West Coast.

Oral Questions

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FISHERIES
Sub-subtopic:   STORAGE OF LOGS IN COWICHAN RIVER ESTUARY-EFFECT ON FISH HABITAT
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

March 16, 1984