March 15, 1984

POLITICAL PARTIES

LIB

Gaston Gourde (Parliamentary Secretary to the Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. Gaston Gourde (Levis):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Leader of the Opposition is now reaping his whirlwind. By showing he is only an illusion, he is now losing those who might have been his best supporters, in fact, all those who have been deluding themselves about his capabilities.

The Leader of the Provincial Conservatives in Alberta, Mr. Gary Filmon, did not mince his words in today's edition of the Globe and Mail... sorry, Manitoba ... He said that one day, the Leader of the Opposition-the Progressive Conservatives are amused-but it was Manitoba, and in any case, it is a fact that last night Mr. Mulroney, the Leader of the Opposition, turned down an invitation to attend a meeting of ethnic groups, apparently because of a previous engagement, while

March 15, 1984

several weeks ago he had accepted an invitation to be the Honorary President at this dinner.

One day he repudiates the Member for Winnipeg-Assinib-oine (Mr. McKenzie) and other members of his party because of their position on bilingualism, one day he claims he will not tolerate dissent in the party on a subject as important as bilingualism, and the next day he says that dissent is permissible in certain areas.

Mr. Speaker, I think Francophones in Canada will not forget what the Leader of the Opposition has done for bilingualism in this country by failing to commit himself.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Sub-subtopic:   ATTITUDE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD

PC

Stanley Kenneth Schellenberger

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stan Schellenberger (Wetaskiwin):

Mr. Speaker, fortunately for western feed grain producers, off-board prices are rising rapidly and will soon attain values of 30 cents to 35 cents per bushel above initial prices offered by the Canadian Wheat Board. Because of relatively stable world prices, helped by the United States payment in kind program and drought, our Canadian producers deserve a better deal from the Canadian Wheat Board. This can only be accomplished if the Government approves another interim payment on barley and a first such increase on malting barley and oats.

The Pool has sufficient funds to satisfy such a request. Perhaps as much as $1 billion of farmers' money will be in that Pool by the end of this crop year if no further interim payments are made. Farmers need this money now as they prepare for Spring seeding. They also require action from the Government on the Western Grain Stabilization Fund, farm interest rates, particularly extension of the Farm Credit Corporation rebate program, farm fuel prices and taxation, and the list goes on. Food production must be given more serious attention by the Government.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Sub-subtopic:   INTERIM BARLEY PAYMENTS REQUESTED
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ESTABLISHMENT OF NEW ALUMINUM COMPANY IN QUEBEC

?

Mr. Pierre Gimai@

Mr. Speaker, in a speech he made this week in Montreal, the Quebec Minister of Industry and Trade, Mr. Rodrigue Biron, announced that a special group of officials had been formed to meet representatives of major aluminum companies throughout the world and persuade them them to locate in Quebec. Mr. Speaker, as the Member for Lac-Saint-Jean, 1 am rising in the House today because I wish to point out to the same Minister that aluminum has always been one of the major industries in my region. Over the years, more

than 10,000 people have been employed in aluminum refineries in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean area. In my riding and more specifically in Alma, we have lost 600 jobs out of 1,200 available over the last six years. Mr. Speaker, I am concerned about the fact that the Government of Quebec, in its worldwide campaign to bring new aluminum companies to my province, seems to have forgotten the development potential of the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean area for this industry. I think this is unfortunate, in view of all the infrastructures that were provided by the federal Government, including gas, harbour and airport facilities, thus making it attractive for new companies to locate here with Alcan, especially considering that Alcan has to modernize its facilities to remain competitive, with the resulting loss of jobs which started a few years ago. I therefore urge the Government of the Province of Quebec to remember those who pioneered in the aluminum industry in Canada and the Province of Quebec, the people of the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean area who very strongly supported-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ESTABLISHMENT OF NEW ALUMINUM COMPANY IN QUEBEC
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. I am sorry to interrupt the Hon. Member. The Hon. Member for Saskatoon East.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ESTABLISHMENT OF NEW ALUMINUM COMPANY IN QUEBEC
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HUMAN RIGHTS

NDP

Robert Joseph Ogle

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bob Ogle (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw to the attention of this House the upcoming Conference of the Latin American Association for Human Rights which begins tomorrow in Montreal and continues through Sunday. This event is of particular interest because it brings Latin Americans of note, including the Vice-Presidents of Bolivia and Ecuador, to Canada. It provides a special opportunity for discussing and developing initiatives for defence of human rights and the establishment of peace with justice between Latin Americans and with their American colleagues.

One aspect of the preparation of the Conference is troubling. Although its organizers, the Latin America Association for Human Rights and Canadian co-sponsors, La ligue des droits et libertes, the Canadian Catholic Organization for Development and Peace, and the Inter-Church Committee on Human Rights in Latin America, have made frequent representations to the Department of External Affairs seeking limited financial support and high level personal participation in the conference, neither the funds promised nor the participation have been confirmed.

Given the level of significance of the visitors from Latin America, and the scope of the issues before the event, I fail to undertand this attitude. I am disturbed by this seeming lack of enthusiasm and I encourage the Hon. Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. MacEachen) and the Hon. Minister for External Relations (Mr. Pepin) to support the Conference and ensure high quality representation from the Government of Canada.

March 15, 1984

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   SUPPORT URGED FOR LATIN AMERICAN CONFERENCE
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AGRICULTURE

LIB

Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Employment and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, today I wish to make a statement under the provisions of Standing Order 21 about the Holstein Association of Canada. The Association was founded in 1884, and this year, its annual convention is being held here in Ottawa, to celebrate its 100th birthday and to honour various Canadian breeders belonging to the association. Among the various Holstein associations in Canada, there are a number that have been in existence for some years.

Mr. Speaker, in my riding, we have the Holstein Association of Bois-Franc, which is now fifty years old. Members of the association are in the visitors' gallery, and I am proud to see them here today. The Holstein Association of Bois-Franc has many members who have enhanced Canada's reputation in Holstein cattle breeding and have improved Holstein milk production in the region. I am happy to see that the Holstein Association of Canada has chosen Ottawa to hold its annual convention and also to honour the master breeders who received this award last year. Mr. Speaker, perhaps I should explain that in the region of Bois-Franc, which is in the riding of Lotbiniere, a number of people have been classified as master breeders, including, this year, Mr. Andre Laroche of Warwick. Mr. Speaker, I am very happy to see that the Holstein Association of Canada continues to progress and that it has a very solid Quebec membership. People in the riding of Lotbiniere are active members of the association, whose local chapter has more than 300 very active members who are a valuable asset to the Holstein Association.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURE
Sub-subtopic:   HOLSTEIN DAIRY PRODUCTION IN BOIS-FRANC
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

PC

Walter Leland Rutherford (Lee) Clark

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Clark (Brandon-Souris):

Mr. Speaker, I recently visited the Sioux Valley School which is operated by the Sioux Valley Indian Band in my constituency. On that day the students were unable to attend classes because the sewage system had backed up. There were other problems. The school is actually a cluster of small buildings, and the result is a fragmented student population. As well, there are no gymnasium facilities to speak of, and one building is a health and safety hazard.

Despite these conditions, in the five years since the Sioux Valley Indian Band assumed responsiblity for operating the school, the student population has grown, attendance has improved, and students who had once dropped out of offreserve schools have now returned to Sioux Valley to finish their education. Clearly this band has risen to the challenge of preparing for self government.

It is ironic, therefore, that the federal Government is discouraging the band's efforts. Despite repeated pleas by the band for a new school with decent facilities, the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development has refused to construct one until at least 1987, and very possibly much later. The band has offered to take out a loan to finance the construction, but it needs a loan guarantee from the federal Government, and that has not been forthcoming. The Sioux Valley school, therefore, joins a growing backlog of capital projects in Indian education.

Like numerous other Indian bands, the Sioux Valley band has demonstrated that it is capable of meeting its own commitment to education. The Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development should hold up its end of the bargain.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   SIOUX VALLEY BAND SCHOOL
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HUMAN RIGHTS

LIB

James Scott (Jim) Peterson

Liberal

Mr. Jim Peterson (Willowdale):

Mr. Speaker, today, March 15, 1984, Anatoly Shcharansky, Jewish prisoner of conscience in the U.S.S.R., begins his eighth year of imprisonment. We all recall in 1977 when this brave and courageous man was arrested and later brought to court on trumped up charges of having acted as an agent of the U.S. Government. Shcharansky's 13 year prison sentence can only reflect the harshest element of a society which continues to persecute its most vulnerable community.

Shcharansky, who first applied to leave the U.S.S.R. 11 years ago, now symbolizes all Soviet Jews who desire only to be allowed to leave the U.S.S.R. to be reunited with family in their homeland. Last month his mother was given permission to visit him in prison, the first visit in over 18 months. His condition continues to deteriorate. He has heart pains, and suffers from bone and spine diseases.

A new regulation in the prison, Para. 188.3, was in effect under which he could automatically and repeatedly have his sentence extended by up to five years if his behaviour was deemed improper. Previously a change to an inmate's status required a court ruling. Now the commandant can simply note on a prisoner's dossier the details of the alleged misdeed.

At this time, with a change in leadership in the U.S.S.R., we appeal to the Soviet-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   U.S.S.R.-PLEA ON BEHALF OF ANATOLY SHCHARANSKY
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to interrupt the Hon. Member, but the time allotted to him has expired.

March 15, 1984

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   U.S.S.R.-PLEA ON BEHALF OF ANATOLY SHCHARANSKY
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AIR TRANSPORT

PC

Gerry St. Germain

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gerry St. Germain (Mission-Port Moody):

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Transport Commission's Air Transport Committee office in Vancouver is being forced to close in April. This office, which enforces CTC air regulations affecting the licensing of air carriers, is closing because Treasury Board refuses to grant one and one-half more person years. Only five field officers cover our entire nation. Yet other sectors receive billions of dollars. The best way to promote air industry is to ensure safety.

When the Vancouver office closes, the Edmonton field office will have to cover B.C., Alberta, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories. B.C. is experiencing the fastest growth in Canada in the number of new air carriers. Small carriers servicing the resource industries are sprouting up all over B.C. and the Yukon. Yet the Minister of Transport (Mr. Axworthy) shuts the Vancouver office, and keeps the Winnipeg office open despite the negligible growth in Manitoba.

Effective licensing enforcement is crucial for air safety. The air industry is a very exacting and technical industry. The terrain in B.C. and the Yukon is among the most treacherous in the flying world, Mr. Speaker. For the safety of all Canadians, all tourists, and everyone flying in B.C. and the Yukon, I urge the Minister of Transport not to close the Vancouver office, to remain within his budget Estimates, and to consider alternatives other than safety.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Sub-subtopic:   CANADIAN TRANSPORT COMMISSION-ANNOUNCED CLOSURE OF VANCOUVER OFFICE
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THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION

NDP

Rodney Edward Murphy

New Democratic Party

Mr. Rod Murphy (Churchill):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a matter affecting national unity. Our Constitution allows our citizens unrestricted travel from one province to another. Sadly, I must report to the House that the Leader of the Official Opposition, the Hon. Member for Central Nova (Mr. Mulroney), is not being allowed to travel to the Province of Manitoba.

The provincial Leader of the Conservative Party, Mr. Filmon, is reported as saying that Conservative memberships are down and donors are refusing to give money. In reaction to the negative feeling in Manitoba toward the federal Leader, Mr. Filmon is quoted as saying: "I've seen the letters. It's not a crisis... but whether it reaches crisis proportions I can't say right now".

Before this crisis is allowed to occur, the House must act. I recommend that the House pass an all-Party resolution stating that the Conservative Party Leader has a constitutional right to unrestricted travel within Canada, and that this must be respected by the Manitoba Tories. To make the passage of this resolution easier I recommend that a House order be passed stating that each Party be limited to one speaker, that the motion be deemed to be passed without a vote, and that the

Manitoba Conservative MPs be allowed to reach the airport before the debate begins.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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March 15, 1984