March 9, 1984

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

INSOLVENCY ACT

PC

Constantine George (Gus) Mitges

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gus Mitges (Grey-Simcoe):

Mr. Speaker, Bill C-17, the Insolvency Act, was introduced for first reading in the House of Commons on January 31 of this year. However, the Government has not seen fit since that time to bring forth the Bill for second reading and debate. The only conclusion that I can come to, Mr. Speaker, is that the Government is not giving this Bill high enough priority for active consideration.

Many segments of our society, including the farming community, are counting on this Bill to offer some direction and some relief to individuals who may be on the verge of bankruptcy.

Procrastination by the Government on this Bill has been responsible for many producers going out of business and losing everything that took them years to accomplish. To add insult to injury, it has come to my knowledge from constituents in my riding that some government Members and some staff members of Ministers are spreading untruths and utter falsehoods, to the effect that the Opposition is preventing the passage of the Bill. This is utter nonsense, Mr. Speaker, and all they are doing is putting even greater distance between themselves and their credibility with the Canadian people. Therefore, Mr. Speaker, I call upon the Government to stop this nonsense and bring forth Bill C-17 so that it can be debated and passed into law as soon as possible.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INSOLVENCY ACT
Sub-subtopic:   CALL FOR EARLY PASSAGE
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MEDICAL RESEARCH

PC

Arthur Jacob (Jake) Epp

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Jake Epp (Provencher):

Mr. Speaker, medical history was made in Toronto this week. A team of eight researchers, led by bio-chemist Tak Mak and post doctoral fellow Yusuke Yanagi, revealed to the world that their group has discovered the key to the human body's immunilogical system and thus have handed to the world's scientists the tools necessary to

unlock the medicine chest of curatives for such haunting diseases as AIDS, arthritis, leukemia and other cancers.

I think this incredible news will go a long way to dispel the fears of many who wondered whether Terry Fox's fabulous gift could be made adequate use of here in Canada. Our country's bio-medical research community has proven to all that they are of world class calibre and deserving of world class recognition.

As well, maybe now Terry's Marathon of Hope will bear the fruit he so passionately strove for, as Canadian scientists and, indeed, those the world over, can now undertake a giant leap forward the likes of which has not been witnessed by humanity since the invention of the microscope.

Dr. Mak and his team, the Canadian Cancer Institute, the Ontario Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, and the Medical Research Council of Canada, deserve this Chamber's heartiest congratulations.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MEDICAL RESEARCH
Sub-subtopic:   IMMUN(LOGICAL SYSTEM DISCOVERY MADE BY TORONTO RESEARCHERS
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MEDICAL RESEARCH
Sub-subtopic:   IMMUN(LOGICAL SYSTEM DISCOVERY MADE BY TORONTO RESEARCHERS
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ABORIGINAL RIGHTS

LIB

André Maltais

Liberal

Mr. Andre Maltais (Manicouagan):

Mr. Speaker, in connection with the Constitutional Conference on Aboriginal Rights which started yesterday, I would like to point out Hon. Members that the Provinces should put more emphasis on the need to reach an agreement with the federal Government that will confirm the rights of the first inhabitants of this country. Mr. Speaker, I think it is very important to understand the requests of the native peoples. Considering the vagueness that seems to prevail at this Conference, I think that in the next few hours, the provinces should do a great deal more to ensure that they have something to show for their work at the end of the two-day Constitutional Conference on Aboriginal Rights.

Mr. Speaker, I also wish to draw the attention of the House to the need for recognition by the Premier of Newfoundland of the hunting, trapping and fishing rights of Indians in Labrador, especially of those living on the Quebec side, because at the present time, they are being prevented from living the kind of life they lead on the Newfoundland side of Labrador. I therefore hope that the Premier of Newfoundland will listen to those requests. It is very simple . .. Newfoundland would take the same approach already being taken by Quebec, which is to

March 9, 1984

let the caribou and the Indians cross provincial boundaries freely and let the Indians use their skills to make a living.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   ABORIGINAL RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   AGREEMENT ON RECOGNITION OF INDIAN RIGHTS
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CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

NDP

Robert Joseph Ogle

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bob Ogle (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, a crucial factor in Third World development is the work of women. In Africa, 80 per cent of the agricultural work is done by women. In all Third World countries over 50 per cent of the non-imported food is grown by women. In Benin, Burundi, and Liberia, significantly more women are in the labour force than there are men. In Kenya, Lesotho, and Botswana, women head one-third of the families. Actually, over one billion women in Third World countries live in rural areas with agriculture as their primary occupation. In Southeast Asia and West Africa women dominate rural market trade upon which local economies and families are sustained. Third World women have a vital influence on the quality of education, nutrition, and health care.

Cultural patterns in both the North and the South have conditioned people to regard men as the primary movers in economic and social progress. This cultural mind-set has blinded many people to the enormous latent power of women to effect change, if given a helping hand.

At this time the president of CIDA is a woman, Margaret Catley-Carlson. Women are rare in other significant areas of CIDA, however. I suggest that this policy be rescinded and that a far greater emphasis be placed on Canadian women in leadership roles in CIDA programs and projects.

I call on the Government to act on recent OECD guiding principles to aid agencies so that women are brought into decision-making for the design, development, and implementation of projects. Take affirmative action. Place more women in decision-making roles in CIDA. Canada's program could produce much more and better development.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
Sub-subtopic:   DECISION-MAKING ROLES FOR WOMEN
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

PC

Gerry St. Germain

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gerry St. Germain (Mission-Port Moody):

Mr. Speaker, the labour force figures released this morning show that once again the number of people without jobs in Canada has risen.

Unemployment hits hardest at young people, and at heads of families who grow discouraged and despondent from weeks and months of looking for jobs, without success. One group which must be of particular concern are single parent families, headed by women who have lost their jobs. Their numbers

have increased in the past year, and their needs have become greater.

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With rising rates of divorce and rising rates of unemployment, there are now substantial numbers of women who are being told that their jobs have been terminated, while their responsibilities for the needs and support of their children increase.

The average income of families headed by men is approximately $34,000. The average income of families headed by women is just half, or $17,000. Some 45 per cent of female headed families live in poverty. That surely is tragic enough, Mr. Speaker, but to have that tragedy compounded by increasing unemployment among their ranks is totally unacceptable.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   WOMEN'S UNEMPLOYMENT LEVELS
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NATIONAL DEFENCE

LIB

Peter Joseph Lang (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State (Youth))

Liberal

Mr. Peter Lang (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of State (Youth)):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to correct some erroneous information which the Hon. Member for Calgary Centre (Mr. Andre) has left with the House in his statements and questions on March 7 regarding the SARP Program, the production of rifles in Kitchener for the Canadian Armed Forces.

The Hon. Member claimed that rifles being made by Diemaco in Kitchener are costing the taxpayers twice what it would cost if we purchased them from the United States. Does the Hon. Member realize that his figures are quite inaccurate and based only on what was in the press? He has simply divided the number of rifles into the total price of the contract. If he had looked past the press reports, he would have been able to realize that over $30.1 million of the $107 million contract is money being used for engineering, design, tooling and gauging, spare parts, training aids, cleaning kits, and preservation packaging.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   SUPPORT FOR RIFLE PURCHASE CONTRACT
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PC

J. Michael Forrestall (Deputy Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Forrestall:

It is still part of the cost of the rifle.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   SUPPORT FOR RIFLE PURCHASE CONTRACT
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LIB

Peter Joseph Lang (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State (Youth))

Liberal

Mr. Lang:

The actual cost of the Canadian rifle is $850.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   SUPPORT FOR RIFLE PURCHASE CONTRACT
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PC

J. Michael Forrestall (Deputy Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Forrestall:

No, it is not.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   SUPPORT FOR RIFLE PURCHASE CONTRACT
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LIB

Peter Joseph Lang (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State (Youth))

Liberal

Mr. Lang:

The cost of buying the rifle in the United States was a low estimate at $820. This did not include the massive subsidization of the production of those rifles by the United States Defence Department. Is the Hon. Member for Calgary Centre a spokesman for United States protectionism against Canadian jobs? This contract is providing long-term employment for-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   SUPPORT FOR RIFLE PURCHASE CONTRACT
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I am sorry to interrupt the Hon. Member but the time allotted to him has expired.

March 9, 1984

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   SUPPORT FOR RIFLE PURCHASE CONTRACT
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PROVINCIAL AFFAIRS

March 9, 1984