February 20, 1984

NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles

New Democratic Party

Hon. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, it is not my purpose to take part in an argument. In fact I am not even trying to predict the date of the federal election, whatever that date may be. However, it seems important to me that newspapers keep the rules straight on how the date plan is decided.

In this connection I draw attention to the fact that in 1930 there was an election whereby the Seventeenth Parliament was elected. That vote took place on July 28, 1930, and it was gazetted on August 15, 1930. Four years later R. B. Bennett decided that he wanted to delay the election, but he accepted the fact that because of the rule Parliament had to be dissolved on August 14, 1935. Then Mr. Bennett set the election date for October 14, 1935. I remember the date very well. Even though I was only 27 years of age, I ran in the general election that day and lost. At any rate, the Seventeenth Parliament lasted five years and two months, from one election to another.

Then in 1940 there was voting for the Nineteenth Parliament. That election was called on Tuesday, March 26, 1940, and it was gazetted on April 15, 1940. The result of that was that in 1945 the Nineteenth Parliament was dissolved on April 16 because it was a Monday, April 15 being a Sunday. Then it was arranged that the voting would take place on June 11, 1945. That was one of the elections I won. So did the Liberal Government.

These are two examples of the Government delaying for the full term of five years and two months. There are no other occasions of this, except in 1917 for the war election during

February 20, 1984

World War I. It is an established fact that Government can wait five years and a bit longer.

Topic:   PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Subtopic:   DURATION OF PARLIAMENTS
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to interrupt the Hon. Member, but his allotted time has expired.

Topic:   PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Subtopic:   DURATION OF PARLIAMENTS
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Let him continue.

Topic:   PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Subtopic:   DURATION OF PARLIAMENTS
Permalink
LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

He may continue.

Topic:   PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Subtopic:   DURATION OF PARLIAMENTS
Permalink
NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles

New Democratic Party

Mr. Knowles:

I just want to make the point that the present Government was elected on February 18, 1980, and was gazetted on March 10, 1980. That means, therefore, that it has agreed that Parliament is dissolved on March 10, 1985, and it could set the election two months later, which would make it in May, 1985.

I am not trying to predict the election date. I am just asking the newspapers and those who look at this matter to understand what is the rule. The only other point I would like to make is that perhaps you, Mr. Speaker, would like to predict what will be the date of the next election. Or I wonder if you will guess it.

Topic:   PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Subtopic:   DURATION OF PARLIAMENTS
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PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS

EXPENDITURE ON WEATHER PROTECTION AT SPEAKERS' ENTRANCES

PC

A. Daniel McKenzie

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dan McKenzie (Winnipeg-Assiniboine):

Mr. Speaker, it is outrageous and unbelievable that the Government has the audacity to spend $275,000 flagrantly to build overhangs which will protect the Speakers of both Chambers from the Canadian weather, while at the same time it allows millions of unemployed and poor Canadians to face high costs, zero job availability and creation-are you listening, John-and the impending harsh reality that the present is bleak, and the future, if under the selfish Liberal Government, holds no hope for improvement.

On behalf of the poor and the unemployed of the country I condemn this irresponsible, insulting Government for its foolish extravagance, when this money could be well used in many ways to assist those who cannot afford food or basic daily essentials. Certainly most cannot afford to build $275,000 porches onto their shelters. Quite bluntly, the Government's priorities are in the wrong order and are disgusting, repulsive, and blatantly insulting to all Canadians.

Topic:   PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
Subtopic:   EXPENDITURE ON WEATHER PROTECTION AT SPEAKERS' ENTRANCES
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THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION

LIB

Denis √Čthier (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment)

Liberal

Mr. Denis Ethier (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of the Environment):

Mr. Speaker, when the Minister of Finance (Mr. Lalonde) announced the date for the presentation of his Budget, the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Mulroney), the temporary member for Central Nova, immediately cried foul.

He went so far as to call it a cheap shot on the part of the Government to introduce a budget when the Leader of the Opposition was planning to be in Europe.

We all know the grandstanding of the Hon. Member for Central Nova. He would cancel his trip to Europe because, for him, the Budget and the economy of this country were his main concern, and discussing the Budget and the economy should be a top priority. Well, the Budget was in fact presented on Wednesday, February 15, and the Leader of the Opposition has not been seen in the House since. Would it be fair to assume that he is changing his priorities?

Topic:   THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER SOFTWARE

PC

Thomas Edward Siddon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Thomas Siddon (Richmond-South Delta):

Mr. Speaker, Canada's fledgling computer software industry is being threatened with extinction, and two recent events have shown that the Cabinet lacks even a basic understanding of the situation.

One of these events is actually a non-event, arising from last week's Budget. It was a non-event because the Minister of Finance (Mr. Lalonde) failed to change the income tax definition in order to extend research and development benefits to the development of computer software, this despite a discussion paper and a task force that flowed from the previous Budget.

The other event of importance is the proposal currently before the Japanese Government that would require the compulsory licensing of computer software ideas from outside Japan to any Japanese company. Such a measure could decimate Canada's chances of marketing a universe of unique products, not only in Japan but anywhere in the world. Telidon is a prime example of the kind of Canadian idea that could be lost by this legislation.

When my colleague from Cariboo-Chilcotin raised this matter in the House a few days ago, the Minister of State for Science and Technology (Mr. Johnston) appeared not to know anything about it, even though numerous articles have appeared in the popular press, including Business Week. The Economist, and The New York Times. High-level delegations from other countries, including the United States, have visited Japan to make representations over this serious problem, but not a word from our Government. I know-

Topic:   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Subtopic:   DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER SOFTWARE
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LIB

Gildas L. Molgat (Speaker pro tempore)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to interrupt the Hon. Member but his time has expired.

Topic:   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Subtopic:   DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER SOFTWARE
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EMPLOYMENT

LACK OF PROSPECTS FOR STUDENTS

NDP

Robert Joseph Ogle

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bob Ogle (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, recently a book entitled "Jobs Canada", published by a non-profit group

February 20, 1984

in Toronto called Bridging the Gap, is being distributed to 2.5 million Canadians. It is a glossy publication. It is supposed to be non-governmental, but it contains a picture of the Minister of Employment and Immigration (Mr. Roberts), and obviously has government plans for the unemployed.

A reporter has indicated some of the jobs given in the booklet are air traffic controllers, bartenders, and newspaper editors. I would like to say that in general it is "Alice in Wonderland".

I received a letter today, and a telephone call from some students at the University of Saskatchewan in the engineering faculty. Blake Rooks indicates that of 60 mechanical engineers in his class, three have jobs; of approximately 30 civil engineers, none have jobs; there are 17 agricultural engineers, and three have jobs; of 30 geology engineers, none have jobs. That is the reality. The Government has to look to the real world where people are unemployed. There has been no recovery, certainly no recovery for students, and no recovery for those on unemployment insurance. We have to tell our Government to deal with the real world.

Topic:   EMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   LACK OF PROSPECTS FOR STUDENTS
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LIB

FORESTRY

SITUATION OF INDUSTRY-NEED FOR ACTION

February 20, 1984