May 27, 1980

PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Joe Clark (Leader of the Opposition):

Madam Speaker, I think this is one occasion on which 1 can truly claim to speak on behalf of all members of the House of Commons when I say to the member of Parliament for Hamilton West (Mr. Alexander) just how very much he will be missed in this assembly, in the work of Parliament and of government. I think it is true to say that no member of Parliament is better liked in this House and that no member of Parliament will be more sorely missed by his colleagues.

The hon. member for Hamilton West served here with distinction for 12 productive years. He became a symbol of Canadian democracy and a spokesman for Canadians in need across this land. He served his constituency with care and sensitivity. He served in cabinet as an outstanding minister of labour. But more importantly to him and to us, he won the respect and affection of all who were associated with the House of Commons.

We all wish him well in the new responsibilities which he has accepted, but this House of Commons will miss Lincoln Alexander and will long remember him as one of the outstanding individuals ever to have served in this Parliament.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader)

New Democratic Party

Hon. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Madam Speaker, the right hon. Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Clark) was perfectly correct when he said that on this occasion he was speaking for everyone in this House of Commons. I should just like to make that very clear and very certain by associating the New Democratic Party with the sentiments that have been expressed.

I rise to speak on behalf of my leader, the hon. member for Oshawa (Mr. Broadbent), who, like the hon. member for

Hamilton West (Mr. Alexander), first came here in 1968. I also speak on behalf of all my colleagues.

We enjoyed the remarks the hon. member made today in his final speech in this chamber. I think what appealed to us most-at least, it appealed to me-was his emphasis on the friendships he has developed in this assembly, friendships that he will carry with him through the rest of his life. We have not always agreed with the hon. member. He and I have had some interesting discussions, but more often than not we have agreed and we have common interests. He has served this place with distinction. He has put forth his best effort and he fully deserves the tributes we have been paying to him in these few moments today.

We say goodbye to Lincoln Alexander from the House of Commons and we wish him the very best through all the years that lie ahead.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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LIB

William Kenneth Robinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada; Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of State for Social Development)

Liberal

Mr. W. Kenneth Robinson (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Justice and Minister of State for Social Development):

Madam Speaker, it is indeed a pleasure for me to have the opportunity of saying a few words in tribute to my colleague and friend, and my colleague from law school as well. We both went to Osgoode Hall law school and got to know each other very well over the years. Of course, he has been much more successful than I, and I guess he was more successful in law school as well. He has certainly been more successful politically. Although we were both elected in 1968, I sort of took a sabbatical from 1972 to 1974 while he continued to serve here. We have both been around since that time, Madam Speaker.

On behalf of this party I want to echo the sentiments of the right hon. Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Clark) and the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) who spoke for the New Democratic Party.

I have enjoyed working with the hon. member these many years. He is going on to his reward with a new career-a career with the Workmen's Compensation Board in the province of Ontario. As a member from Ontario, I know that I shall be working with him and seeing him from time to time. 1 can only say au revoir, good luck, and God be with you.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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LIB

Bryce Stuart Mackasey

Liberal

Hon. Bryce Mackasey (Lincoln):

Thank you, Madam Speaker, for permitting me this opportunity of adding my voice to those of the leader of the Conservative party and others in paying tribute to one who is best described as a very personal friend.

When the hon. gentleman arrived in this House in 1968, I was then the minister of labour. In a comparatively short period of time I was very much aware of a rather brash, talented new member of the opposition party. In no time at all, as I recall, the hon. member became the Official Opposition critic of the labour portfolio. One day I called him over after a rather tough question or two and expressed the opinion that he

May 27, 1980

had perhaps been a little unfair. He reminded me that he had patterned his particular style after mine, which made it very difficult for me. He is a very charming individual.

I repeat what has often been said, that this is a very unique institution. I recall the hon. member and his wife coming with us to the ILO convention in Geneva in the early seventies. 1 had an opportunity to break bread with him and get to know him well. I must admit that 1 have always had a particularly soft spot for the hon. gentleman, particularly since he is the member of Parliament for the riding in which my mother lives.

I am not just sure how she voted in the last election, since very early in the campaign she received a personal visit from the hon. member.

In conclusion, I want to say as one who left this House in 1976 that it is not at best a very easy decision. If we are selfish we tend to remain here because we enjoy the company of members, the challenge and the unpredictability of the House of Commons if you are a House of Commons man.

I recall on a similar occasion that the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) expressed the wish that perhaps one day fortune would be such that I would be back in the House of Commons. I hope that what happened to me does not happen to the hon. gentleman.

I know, from the hon. member's record in this House of Commons and particularly from his compassion when he was minister of labour for those wonderful Canadians who do manual work for a living, that he is more than adequate to fulfil the role of head of Ontario's workmen's compensation board. I bridled and went to the defence of the hon. member when, shortly after his appointment, it was suggested by certain members of the press that he lacked the qualifications for the job. I think, Madam Speaker, that the qualities which the hon. gentleman has exemplified so many times here- compassion, concern, curiosity, willingness and devotion to work-are all the qualifications he needs to fill this very sensitive position, and I wish him well.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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NDP

Mark Willson Rose

New Democratic Party

Mr. Mark Rose (Mission-Port Moody):

Madam Speaker, I will be very brief. I know that all of us in this House would like to pay special tribute to the departing member for Hamilton West (Mr. Alexander). We are extremely fond of him. As a matter of fact, I do not think it would be too much to say that we love him.

He is one of the four surviving members of the Conservative party of the class of '68; I am one of the four survivors of the class of '68 in my own party.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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NDP

Lorne Edmund Nystrom (Whip of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Nystrom:

Retreaded.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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NDP

Mark Willson Rose

New Democratic Party

Mr. Rose:

Recycled and retreaded. I should like to tell him that I express no flim-flam at all when I suggest that the kind of friendship he has developed with all members of the House on both sides is unique. He is unique in a lot of ways. He is a person with drive, intelligence, forcefulness and a tremendously big heart.

Order Paper Questions

We plan to have a meeting of the survivors of the class of '68 on June 25, which is a very important anniversary. Although he intends to resign from this House today or tomorrow, I should like him to know that we intend to award him special status and hope that he will be able to come to Ottawa and join the survivors of '68. There are some 25 members left out of approximately 100 who were elected, which tells something about job security around this place.

We offer the hon. member congratulations on his new career and want to let him know that we will certainly miss him. I know that he will miss us, and I hope he comes back some day.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
Permalink
LIB

Yvon Pinard (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Yvon Pinard (President of the Privy Council):

Madam Speaker, on behalf of my colleagues I also want to pay tribute to the hon. member for Hamilton West (Mr. Alexander). His contribution to the Parliament of Canada has been exceptional. He dedicated 12 years of his life to representing his constituents and Canadians as a whole in the best way he could, and I believe the circumstances justify that, on behalf of the government, I should offer him our best wishes, good health and a successful career outside this House.

I do not want to add further to what was said by those who knew him more intimately, but I would like to say that I personally had the opportunity to come in contact with him on several occasions. He proved himself to be a seasoned parliamentarian but always polite and always aware of that spirit that must stir us of being adversaries, of course, but at the same time people working for a common cause-the improvement of the well-being of Canadians as a whole.

In conclusion, Madam Speaker, I have recognized a good sense of humour in the hon. member for Hamilton West. I am sure he will agree with me when I say that the House of Commons will have a "missing Line."

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HON. LINCOLN M. ALEXANDER
Permalink

QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


LIB

David Michael Collenette (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. D. M. Collenette (Parliamentary Secretary to President of the Privy Council):

Madam Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 14, 91, 289, 292, 381, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395 and 593.

I ask, Madam Speaker, that the remaining questions be allowed to stand.

May 27, 1980

Order Paper Questions

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
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PC

Mr. Cossitt

Progressive Conservative

1. Was or is an individual named Janis John Grimba or Janis John Gimba employed by the Department of External Affairs and, if so (a) under what circumstances (b) was he involved with security (c) what were his duties?

2. (a) To the knowledge of the government, is he presently on bail in the amount of $100,000 from a penal institution in Kingston, Ontario (b) what was the nature of the charge for which he was convicted including all available details and date of conviction?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   JAN1S JOHN GRIMBA
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LIB

David Michael Collenette (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. D. M. Collenette (Parliamentary Secretary to President of the Privy Council):

I am informed by the Secretary of State for External Affairs and the Solicitor General as follows:

1. There is no record of Janis John Grimba or Janis John Gimba having been employed by the Department of External Affairs.

2. It has been ascertained from provincial authorities that there is a Janis John Grimba presently on bail from the Toronto East Detention Centre. The honourable member should therefore re-direct his question to the Attorney General of Ontario.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   JAN1S JOHN GRIMBA
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(d) 1974- 50,000 1975- 110,000 1976- 110,000 1977- 150,000 1978- 140,000 1979- 140,000 1980- 130,000 Metric Monitor Distribution-1979 Audience Per cen( Federal Government 7 55 Provincial Government 3 57 Municipal Government 2.50 Parliament n 37 Media 2.'l4 Metric Commission Canada 0.11 Metric Related Organizations 1.32 Steering and Sector Committees 1.79 Canadian Libraries 154 Chambers of Commerce 16.93 Corporations 25.00 Corporate Metric Conversion Officers 14.29 Institutions g qo Canadian General Public 7 gg ti.S.A. and Foreign Public 0.71 Public Enquiries 7 7] Total |00 Metric Monitors 11,000 5.000 3.500 800 3.000 150 1,850 2.500 2,300 23,700 35.000 20.000 8,400 11,000 1.000 10,800 140,000


PC

Mr. Cossitt

Progressive Conservative

1. Is the tabloid newspaper "Metric Monitor" published by the Metric Commission of Canada, P.O. Box 4000, Ottawa, Ontario and paid for from public funds and, if so (a) on what date did this publication commence and specifically was it in September, 1973 (b) how many issues have been printed (c) what has been the cost of each issue and what has been the total cost of all issues combined (d) how many copies of the "Metric Monitor" were printed for each edition and generally to whom were they circulated?

2. For what reasons is the government continuing to print such publications at a time when introduction of the metric system has been under review by a committee appointed by the former minister of industry, trade and commerce?

3. Is it the government's intention to continue with the review?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   METRIC MONITOR
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May 27, 1980