November 9, 1979

REMEMBRANCE DAY

TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME

PC

Allan Bruce McKinnon (Minister of National Defence; Minister of Veterans Affairs)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Allan B. McKinnon (Minister of National Defence and Minister of Veterans Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, on Sunday at 11 a.m., this nation will officially observe a day of remembrance for the 115,000 Canadian men and women who gave their lives in the defence of freedom in two world wars and the Korean conflict.

Their sacrifice is remembered, not only at the National Memorial in Ottawa, but all across this great land and in many other parts of the world. Our allies also keep the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month sacred to commemorate the war dead. It is the time that our country stops to pay its respects in cities, towns and villages to those of our countrymen and women who paid the supreme sacrifice.

Three times during this century, young Canadians from the Atlantic provinces, from Quebec and Ontario, and from western and Pacific Canada went by sea and air to distant lands to defend freedom-France, Italy, Belgium, Holland, Hong Kong and Korea were their destinations. Many of these brave young Canadians died in places far from their homes, places such as Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele, Dieppe, the Hochwald, Ortona and Kapyong.

It is their heroism that we commemorate today. We remember them with pride, for they served with distinction. We remember also with sorrow, for they forfeited their lives in the service of our country.

To those of us who remain, the legacy is clear: we too must dedicate ourselves to the service of our country. We must ensure that it remains "glorious and free", as they would want to see it if they could.

On this Day of Remembrance, let us resolve to live in peace and harmony with one another. Let us ensure that the tragic price paid by more than 115,000 young Canadians has not been paid in vain.

All hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Topic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME
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LIB

Leonard Donald Hopkins

Liberal

Mr. Leonard Hopkins (Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke):

Mr. Speaker, I am deeply honoured to rise to pay respect, on behalf of the official opposition, to the more than 100,000 Canadians who died in the defence of freedom. These were young men and women with their whole lives ahead of them. By their sacrifice we have been allowed to live in peace in a country

untouched by the physical ravages of war. For hundreds of thousands of Canadians the memory of loved ones lost remains vivid and painful. Those who returned have memories of the buddies they left behind, memories of joyous comradeship and of grievous, sudden loss. Once each year, Canadians gather at cenotaphs in every community to remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice.

[DOT] (mo)

As Canadians, and especially as members of the Parliament of Canada, we should also remember those who returned with handicaps that have made it difficult or impossible for them to enjoy all that life has to offer. There are patients in veterans' hospitals across this country who have been there since the end of the first world war, over 60 years ago. Let us not forget these veterans who also paid a heavy price.

We can also honour the memory of those who perished by maintaining our commitment to the preservation of peace today by supporting our Canadian Armed Forces at home and abroad, in NATO and in their useful role as peacekeepers. To many who have no concept of the horrors of war, our present peaceful existence seems "permanent". We must never let down our guard. For citizens of a free country, every day should be a remembrance day, and by giving support to those who now defend Canada today we show respect and gratitude to those who served and died to ensure our freedom.

The last major world war came to an end over 34 years ago, but no one can deny that we have lived in times of almost constant turmoil with war remaining an every day part of life for millions throughout the world.

Let us in all seriousness realize that if we, along with other member nations of the free world, do not have the determination, the courage and the will to meet the challenges of our times, then we will not, in fact, be keeping faith with those who died.

I would like to quote a poem by Pearl McGinnis entitled "Today" which I feel is very appropriate.

I have no yesterdays,

Time took them away.

Tomorrow may not be.

But I have today.

We have today to honour those 100,000 Canadians who proved their dedication to Canada and who gave their tomorrows to us. Let us think constantly about these words as we attend various services this weekend.

There is a saying that those who fail to bear their own arms will eventually bear someone else's. Today we are honouring those who not only bore arms in the name of Canada, but

November 9, 1979

Remembrance Day

indeed distinguished themselves in doing so. They answered the call of duty, and we will remember them.

Topic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME
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NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, it is probably one of the most fitting and appropriate things that we as Canadians do when on November 11 of each year we pause to remember those who gave their lives on our behalf for this country and for peace and freedom throughout the world in the first great war, in the second great war, in Korea and in other engagements, particularly in peacekeeping operations. So it is equally fitting and appropriate that in this House of Commons on this last sitting day before November 11 we take this moment to remember all of them.

We pledge ourselves not only to remember with respect those who gave their lives, but to remember those who are still with us, and indeed do everything we can for them. We pledge ourselves to remember their families and their survivors. We also pledge ourselves to do everything we possibly can to build the kind of world in which it will not happen again.

Topic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

[ Translation]

Topic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME
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SC

Joseph Adrien Henri Lambert

Social Credit

Mr. Adrien Lambert (Bellechasse):

Mr. Speaker, memory is a faculty which too easily forgets. This is why special days have been designated to enable people to recall their past; among them Remembrance Day is set aside to remember that if we are living today in a free country which provides us so much solace, it is because at a given moment in our history some people lost their lives to guarantee ours.

Thousands of soldiers died on the battlefields of Europe. Thousands of others were wounded. All fought bravely and courageously. Passing years make us forget many things, but never the sacrifice of a life. They died so that others may live. Referring to that ultimate gift, Winston Churchill said: Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

It is therefore quite in order, if not to show respect for life itself and for the example given us by those men, that we show our gratitude. If we really want to preserve that freedom guaranteed by those brave soldiers, let us not abuse it but always show due respect.

Topic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Proceedings pursuant to Standing Order 43, and questions, will continue until ten minutes past twelve.

Topic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO MEMBERS OF CANADIAN FORCES WHO SERVED IN WARTIME
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ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

INQUIRY OF THE MINISTRY

LIB

Mark R. MacGuigan

Liberal

Mr. Mark MacGuigan (Windsor-Walkerville):

Mr. Speaker, in view of the fact, as reported by the press, that the hon. member for Beauce (Mr. Roy) was successfully able to demand from the Prime Minister (Mr. Clark) a ticket for the state banquet tonight in honour of President Carter for services to be rendered, even though many members of the cabinet were not invited to that dinner, and in view of the fact the dinner has now had to be cancelled, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Trinity (Miss Nicholson):

That this House direct the Prime Minister to table the choice of consolation prizes he is now offering the hon. member for Beauce.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY OF THE MINISTRY
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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REMEMBRANCE DAY

NDP

Terence James (Terry) Sargeant

New Democratic Party

Mr. Terry Sargeant (Selkirk-Interlake):

Mr. Speaker, I rise, under the provisions of Standing Order 43, to ask the unanimous consent of this House on a matter of urgent and pressing necessity.

In keeping with the tributes this House has today paid to Canada's war dead, and in light of the fact that few Canadians are aware that one of Canada's most decorated soldiers in the Second World War and Korean war was an Ojibway Indian from the Brokenhead Reserve in Manitoba, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Winnipeg-Birds Hill (Mr. Blaikie):

That this House honour the memory of all Canadians who have served their country in time of war by paying its respects to the late Sgt. Tommy Price of the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Sub-subtopic:   THE LATE SGT. TOMMY PRICE, PRINCESS PATRICIA CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

No matter how worthy the subject, the hon. member will realize that I have consistently ruled this kind of motion out of order with respect to Standing Order 43.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   REMEMBRANCE DAY
Sub-subtopic:   THE LATE SGT. TOMMY PRICE, PRINCESS PATRICIA CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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REQUEST THAT AGE OF DRIVING BE RAISED TO EIGHTEEN-MOTION UNDER S O. 43

PC

Duncan M. Beattie

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Duncan M. Beattie (Hamilton Mountain):

Mr. Speaker, I rise, under the provisions of Standing Order 43, on a matter of urgent and pressing necessity-urgent because of the alarming number of deaths and injuries in traffic accidents across Canada, particularly in the 16 to 18 age category, and pressing in the interests of energy conservation. I move, seconded by the hon. member for Lincoln (Mr. Higson):

That the Prime Minister and/or the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources take the initiative at the first ministers'conference next week to urge the provinces to raise the requirement age of driving from 16 to 18 years of age.

November 9, 1979

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   REQUEST THAT AGE OF DRIVING BE RAISED TO EIGHTEEN-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. I have very grave reservations as to whether or not that subject is within the administrative competence of this House.

That the Prime Minister withdraw his insulting remarks and consider more seriously the Canadian unity issue which must of course prevail over his purely political and partisan interests.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   REQUEST THAT AGE OF DRIVING BE RAISED TO EIGHTEEN-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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NATURAL RESOURCES

LIB

Russell Gregoire MacLellan

Liberal

Mr. Russell MacLellan (Cape Breton-The Sydneys):

Mr. Speaker, I rise, under the provisions of Standing Order 43, on a matter of urgent and pressing necessity.

Whereas the Prime Minister (Mr. Clark) has pledged to hand over control of offshore resources to the provinces, and the Minister of Justice stated in the Standing Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs that he saw no reason why municipalities could not now assess, for purposes of taxation, resources that lie under the ocean and adjacent to the municipality, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Nipissing (Mr. Blais):

That the government instruct all their Crown corporations of this change so that the municipalities concerned can include these resources in their assessments for 1980.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   NATURAL RESOURCES
Sub-subtopic:   JURISDICTION OVER RESOURCES-TAXATION OF MUNICIPALITIES-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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November 9, 1979