November 5, 1979

?

An hon. Member:

No tie.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ADMINISTRATION
Sub-subtopic:   MEASURES TO RESTORE CONFIDENCE IN DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS
Permalink
LIB

Roland de Corneille

Liberal

Mr. de Corneille:

We are told by recent public opinion polls that the population is losing confidence in our democratic processes, partly, I suppose, because of apparent or at least perceived reversals in government policy on such election promises as a stimulative deficit, keeping our interest rates down, and moving our embassy in Israel.

In view of our concern about such loss of confidence, particularly as it might influence our young people, I would like to ask what specific measures the government has in mind to rationalize the management of its decision-making processes to the Canadian people and thus to restore confidence in democratic institutions.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ADMINISTRATION
Sub-subtopic:   MEASURES TO RESTORE CONFIDENCE IN DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS
Permalink
PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Joe Clark (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, in very simple terms, what we intend to do is make this Parliament one which much more accurately reflects the views of individual Canadians. We intend to do this by providing more room to more private members to have more influence on what is done, and to end the domination that has existed for far too long not only by ministers but also by party leaders in the House.

Second, we intend to proceed as quickly as we can with the freedom of information legislation which was introduced and has generally been responded to positively by other members of the House. We hope, as my colleague the minister sponsoring this legislation said at the time, that if there are members of this House who have better and more effective language to propose, they will propose it.

Third, we intend to take a very strong and thorough look at Crown corporations, which some in this House argue belong to the people-although the people do not believe that-to see if we can find ways in which we can substitute state-ownership, which is not personal, by citizen-ownership which can be personal. Those are some of the steps and reforms that I hope, given the interest of the hon. member in ensuring that institutions serve the interests of individuals, he will support us in.

Oral Questions ENERGY

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ADMINISTRATION
Sub-subtopic:   MEASURES TO RESTORE CONFIDENCE IN DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS
Permalink

OWNERSHIP OF AND JURISDICTION OVER NATURAL RESOURCES

LIB

Ian Watson

Liberal

Mr. Ian Watson (Chateauguay):

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Prime Minister. I would like to know whether the recent resource-related threat of the Premier of Alberta has caused the Prime Minister to reconsider certain directions he is taking. I refer to the willingness of the Prime Minister to sell out the common heritage which all Canadians share in our offshore resources.

1 also refer to the haste of the Prime Minister to create provincehood in the Yukon, which implies the sell-out of the common heritage which all Canadians share in our northern resources onshore and offshore. Does the Prime Minister not believe that the first steps toward giving away the oil and gas resources of the north, recently estimated by the Geological Survey of Canada to contain a minimum of $375 billion worth of oil and $540 billion worth of gas-

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   OWNERSHIP OF AND JURISDICTION OVER NATURAL RESOURCES
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Order.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   OWNERSHIP OF AND JURISDICTION OVER NATURAL RESOURCES
Permalink
LIB

Ian Watson

Liberal

Mr. Watson:

-are a question of importance to be considered by Parliament; and will he now reconsider his refusal to have a parliamentary committee review and consider the recent changes in the role of the commissioner in the Yukon which create, for all practical purposes, de facto provincehood in that territory?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   OWNERSHIP OF AND JURISDICTION OVER NATURAL RESOURCES
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Order.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   OWNERSHIP OF AND JURISDICTION OVER NATURAL RESOURCES
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. The hon. member has already used a rather long preamble, and followed his question with a subsequent suggestion. I think he has gone as far as he should be permitted.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   OWNERSHIP OF AND JURISDICTION OVER NATURAL RESOURCES
Permalink
PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Joe Clark (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I will try to answer such questions as I could find. First, no, we do not intend to reverse our position on offshore resources. Second, no, we do not intend to reverse our determination to move the Yukon toward provincial status. Naturally, as I have indicated before, there will be recourse to a referendum and we will not move beyond the law as it now exists without the approval both of the people of the Yukon and of this Parliament. 1 am afraid that in the welter of it all, I lost the third, fourth or fifth questions.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   OWNERSHIP OF AND JURISDICTION OVER NATURAL RESOURCES
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

NDP

Rodney Edward Murphy

New Democratic Party

Mr. Rod Murphy (Churchill):

Mr. Speaker, in view of the absence of the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and the Minister of Employment and Immigration, perhaps the Prime Minister can answer my question.

In light of the fact that the Sunday edition of the Toronto Star released details of a yet-to-be published report basically

November 5, 1979

Oral Questions

stating that essential services on many reserves do not exist, that welfare dependency on these reserves is nine times the Ontario average, and that three federal departments are the cause of this neglect, would the Prime Minister explain how further government cutbacks could do anything but further increase unemployment and further deteriorate health conditions on Ontario Indian reserves and, indeed, on all reserves in Canada?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED CUTBACKS IN ESSENTIAL SERVICES ON RESERVES
Permalink
PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Joe Clark (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I have not seen the report to which the hon. member refers. Because of my own interest in the matter, I do know something about the conditions of starvation and great social inequity which exists on Indian reserves across the country and among native people generally.

I have had the opportunity personally to discuss with representatives of Indian groups across the country practical steps we might take to resolve that situation. One of the views which the Indian leadership and 1 share is that an important step will be to place much more authority, responsibility and control over spending in the hands of local band councils. That is the direction in which the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development is taking this government, and as the hon. member knows, that is a reform and a change from past practices.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED CUTBACKS IN ESSENTIAL SERVICES ON RESERVES
Permalink

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen (Cape Breton Highlands-Canso):

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Prime Minister which has to do with the continuing inability of the government to manage Canada's relations with the Middle East with any intelligence and sensitivity.

All of Saturday I had quoted to me directly a statement made in Los Angeles by the Prime Minister's chief policy adviser who, in pointing out the potential for Canada to become a world oil supplier, went on to say:

-possibly enough to return the Middle East to the insignificance it so richly deserves-

These are statements that have been made several times and attributed to the chief policy adviser of the Prime Minister. Will the Prime Minister assure the House that if these comments by his chief policy adviser were made, they do not represent the policy of the government, and that an apology ought to be made by the government for this provocative and inflammatory comment by the former member for Don Valley?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   RELATIONS WITH MIDDLE EAST-REMARKS OF MR. GILLIES
Permalink
PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Joe Clark (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker. I saw that article and, naturally, was interested in it. Consequently, I spoke to Dr. Gillies and have received from him a clarification and the assurance that his comment was in relation to the influence of the Middle East in times when OPEC was at its

strength, in terms of a cartel operation which can increase the price of fuel that has to be paid here and in other countries.

The point that Dr. Gillies was making was that the capacity of a country in any part of the world to have such an impact on prices will damage Canadian interests, and that that capacity will be significantly reduced as this nation moves toward energy self-sufficiency.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   RELATIONS WITH MIDDLE EAST-REMARKS OF MR. GILLIES
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MacEachen:

Does the Prime Minister tell me that his chief policy adviser did not use the expression, "possibly enough to return the Middle East to the insignificance it so richly deserves"? I want to know if his chief policy adviser used those words and, if so, how they can possibly be used to defend the interpretation which the Prime Minister gives because, of course, the Middle East includes other important nations, including Israel, than the members of OPEC.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   RELATIONS WITH MIDDLE EAST-REMARKS OF MR. GILLIES
Permalink
PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Clark:

My understanding is that Dr. Gillies used those words explicity and exclusively in relation to the capacity to form cartels.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   RELATIONS WITH MIDDLE EAST-REMARKS OF MR. GILLIES
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MacEachen:

Will the Prime Minister also clarify Dr. Gillies' comment when he spoke about the cheap dollar and said that maybe the cheap dollar has been a contributing factor to the country's 9 per cent inflation rate, and then said, "Maybe it hasn't fallen enough"? Dr. Gillies suggested that, "Maybe if it falls to 70 cents". Would the Prime Minister mind clarifying that comment?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   RELATIONS WITH MIDDLE EAST-REMARKS OF MR. GILLIES
Permalink
PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Clark:

That comment also, naturally, was of some interest to me when I read it in the paper.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   RELATIONS WITH MIDDLE EAST-REMARKS OF MR. GILLIES
Permalink

November 5, 1979