March 7, 1979

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An hon. Member:

Hypothetical.

Topic:   EMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   PROGRAM FOR SUMMER JOBS FOR STUDENTS
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Order.

Topic:   EMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   PROGRAM FOR SUMMER JOBS FOR STUDENTS
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. The hon. member for Vancouver Quadra.

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Topic:   EMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   PROGRAM FOR SUMMER JOBS FOR STUDENTS
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THE CANADIAN ECONOMY

DROP IN HOUSING STARTS-EFFECT ON EMPLOYMENT AND COST OF HOMES

NDP

Bob Rae

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bob Rae (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, in the absence of the Minister of Finance I should like to address my question to the President of the Board of Economic Development Ministers.

Figures released by Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation show that housing starts for February are down 45 per cent, from 11,761 last year to 6,413 this year. In view of these figures, can the minister explain to the House when he will introduce specific measures to prevent massive unemployment in the construction industry and to allow Canadians affordable housing?

Topic:   THE CANADIAN ECONOMY
Subtopic:   DROP IN HOUSING STARTS-EFFECT ON EMPLOYMENT AND COST OF HOMES
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LIB

Robert Knight Andras (Minister of State for Economic Development)

Liberal

Hon. Robert K. Andras (President of the Board of Economic Development Ministers):

Mr. Speaker, there is a great deal of optimism justified in terms of construction, industrial and manufacturing plant expansion. The construction association in the housebuilding industry has had five or six years of very high-level housing starts. The view has been put that there will not be a requirement for the same number of housing starts that prevailed over the last five or ten years. I think in each of the last five years they exceeded well over 200,000, or closer to 250,000.

It is doubtful there will be a requirement for that level of starts, so the industry is going to move into industrial and commercial enterprises, as well as the expansion of large plants, energy projects and many others about which the construction industry should be justifiably optimistic.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN ECONOMY
Subtopic:   DROP IN HOUSING STARTS-EFFECT ON EMPLOYMENT AND COST OF HOMES
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

EXTRADITION TREATY WITH GERMANY

PC

William Hillary (Bill) Clarke

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bill Clarke (Vancouver Quadra):

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for External Affairs and it stems from the case of a German born Vancouver resident, Herman Von Pfetten, but it stands to affect many thousands of Canadian citizens who were not born in this country. Mr. Von Pfetten was arrested in the United States on an extradition request by Germany. After a scathing attack on the procedure, a United States magistrate dismissed the case.

I would like to ask the minister about the treaty that Canada has drafted with Germany dealing with extradition, which treaty is expected to be ratified later this year. Will that treaty be retroactive, and will it affect Canadian citizens who may have been born in some other country such as Germany? Will they be subject to extradition requests to Germany, a state which does not extradite its own nationals to any other state?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTRADITION TREATY WITH GERMANY
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LIB

Donald Campbell Jamieson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Donald C. Jamieson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for giving me notice of this question. I share his satisfaction with the outcome of what was a most unfortunate and, as it turned out, unwarranted action against the gentleman in question in the courts. As the hon. member knows, he has been totally exonerated and the case is now closed.

In light of the notice I received, I have been able to get this answer, that the treaty to which the hon. member has made reference must be approved by the German parliament, and that has not as yet taken place. We have had a reciprocal extradition arrangement in effect with West Germany since March, 1974.

On the specific point of the hon. member's question, as it does not apply to offences committed before March, 1974, in the case in question they could not have proceeded against the

March 7, 1979

Privilege-Mr. R. Stewart

gentleman. In any event, there is a considerably more complex legal explanation which I will be glad to send the hon. member by letter, if he so desires.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTRADITION TREATY WITH GERMANY
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PC

William Hillary (Bill) Clarke

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Clarke:

Mr. Speaker, 1 wonder if the minister could give us a projected date for the passage and ratification of this treaty, and could he tell us whether copies are available?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTRADITION TREATY WITH GERMANY
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LIB

Donald Campbell Jamieson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. Jamieson:

I would imagine, on the second part, the answer is yes. I would have to make inquiries. I am afraid I have a hard enough job predicting what matters are going to be passed through this House. 1 do not know what happens in the German parliament, but I will make inquiries.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTRADITION TREATY WITH GERMANY
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PRIVILEGE

MR. R. STEWART-ANNOUNCEMENT OF DECISION TO SIT AS PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE MEMBER

PC

Ralph Wesley Stewart

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ralph Stewart (Cochrane):

Mr. Speaker, some 11 years ago it was my privilege to be chosen by my people in the Cochrane riding to represent them in the Parliament of Canada. I have done my best to serve them ever since.

Being a person of frank expression, I have never hesitated to voice my disagreement. It became clear that any opposition to policy on the part of the troops is not looked upon with favour by the government.

A few years ago 1 became increasingly disillusioned following the famous musings of the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau) on national television when he stated that the free enterprise system had failed. I could not accept that kind of thinking. The free enterprise system is what made the United States great and brought Canada on the road to becoming a great nation.

Later that year many of my colleagues were scandalized when the Prime Minister stated in no uncertain terms at a meeting of Ontario MPs that he had come into politics to move the country further to the left and he had never abandoned that goal.

Feeling that I could not accept this thinking, nor could I change it, I thought seriously of resigning from the caucus. This would have been a betrayal of those who had elected me as a Liberal because it was not long after the last election, so 1 did nothing in that regard. However, now that this parliament is playing an overtime period, the circumstances are vastly different. It is abundantly clear to me that Canada must reject a further drift to the left and it is time for me to take a serious stand.

I fully realize that I shall be making a great personal sacrifice by taking this action today, but my feelings for the principles involved run very high indeed. There is no amount of personal security that could make up for a failure on my part to come to grips with my gut feeling that to do otherwise would be a betrayal of my commitment to Canada and the people I have served.

Several years before I got into active politics, I was already fighting in favour of bilingualism and the French fact in Canada. I believed that better understanding was necessary to promote Canadian unity. I worked hard and I became one of the first advisors on bilingualism within the public service.

In respect of bilingualism and Canadian unity, it is my opinion that the whole problem has been handled badly. Our country is less united that it was ten years ago. The government has gone about it the wrong way and has even allowed it to become a personal vendetta amoung a few elite, including the Prime Minister and the premier of Quebec. The climate created as a result has been one which pits faction against faction and threatens the very existence of Canada as a nation.

The potential of Canada, in my view, is great. It is my feeling that the present governmental policies will not develop that potential.

Accordingly, I have decided, after consultation with my wife and a few respected associates, to leave the Liberal caucus and seek to take my seat with the Progressive Conservative caucus.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. R. STEWART-ANNOUNCEMENT OF DECISION TO SIT AS PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE MEMBER
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

[ Translation]

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. R. STEWART-ANNOUNCEMENT OF DECISION TO SIT AS PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE MEMBER
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MR. ALLARD-DELAY IN ANSWERING ORDER PAPER QUESTION

SC

Eudore Allard

Social Credit

Mr. Eudore Allard (Rimouski):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the attention of the Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Privy Council (Mr. Pinard) to question No. 356 which is on the order paper since October 24-

Topic:   MR. ALLARD-DELAY IN ANSWERING ORDER PAPER QUESTION
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. The hon. member for Rimouski has the floor.

Topic:   MR. ALLARD-DELAY IN ANSWERING ORDER PAPER QUESTION
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March 7, 1979