May 5, 1978

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

FINANCE

PC

Cecil Morris Smith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Cecil Smith (Churchill):

Mr. Speaker, I rise under the provisions of Standing Order 43 on a matter of urgent and pressing necessity. Over the past week, in Toronto, we have been told that 12 people lost their lives due to fire. I do not feel we should stand idly by without taking some positive action. Therefore, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Okanagan Boundary (Mr. Whittaker):

That the Government of Canada withdraw the federal sales tax on smoke detectors and smoke detection equipment.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUESTED WITHDRAWAL OF SALES TAX ON SMOKE DETECTION EQUIPMENT-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Presentation of such a motion for debate, pursuant to Standing Order 43, can be done only with the unanimous consent of the House. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUESTED WITHDRAWAL OF SALES TAX ON SMOKE DETECTION EQUIPMENT-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUESTED WITHDRAWAL OF SALES TAX ON SMOKE DETECTION EQUIPMENT-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUESTED WITHDRAWAL OF SALES TAX ON SMOKE DETECTION EQUIPMENT-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink

ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

PC

Douglas Roche

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Douglas Roche (Edmonton-Strathcona):

Mr. Speaker, in the absence of the Secretary of State for External Affairs, I address my question to the acting secretary of state: it concerns the situation in Angola, the overnight developments. While the reports of the operation differ, there seems to be little doubt now that South African troops did cross the border into Angola. Would the minister, first of all, clarify the nature of this operation? Also, in light of the strong criticism which the United States has levelled against South Africa, can the minister say what the Canadian reaction is?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED INCURSION INTO ANGOLA BY SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Deputy Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen (Deputy Prime Minister and President of Privy Council):

Mr. Speaker, I am not in a position to add very much detail, except to tell the hon. member that we have asked our embassy in Capetown to tell the government of South Africa that Canada is deeply concerned about this military incursion into the territory of a neighbouring sovereign state. We are particularly concerned that this activity should have occurred at a time when negotiations are taking place with the object in mind of achieving a peaceful solution in Namibia.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED INCURSION INTO ANGOLA BY SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS
Permalink
PC

Douglas Roche

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Roche:

Mr. Speaker, the negotiations concerning Namibia have been described as reasonable middle-ground for both parties to seek. What is the effect on the negotiations which have been advanced by Canada, along with its partners on the Security Council representing the western nations? What is the effect of those proposals now, in light of the overnight developments of South Africa invading Angola?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED INCURSION INTO ANGOLA BY SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Deputy Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MacEachen:

Mr. Speaker, it is a little premature to assess the certainty of the effect on these negotiations, but it can only be unsettling. It is a time when restraint ought to be exercised, rather than military activity of this kind, in order to achieve the success of the negotiations.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED INCURSION INTO ANGOLA BY SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS
Permalink
PC

Douglas Roche

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Roche:

Mr. Speaker, the time has come for Canada to clarify the meaning of the announcement made by the Secretary of State for External Affairs on December 19, to the effect that "Canada is going to withdraw government-sponsored, commercially-supported activities in South Africa." What has been the effect of that announcement?

I ask this question in light of the meeting of the external affairs committee yesterday during which the committee was told that Canada, with respect to the code of conduct which was one part of the follow-up to the announcement of December 19, has no way of knowing what the conditions are for the black workers employed by Canadian companies in South Africa. There is no way of knowing what those conditions are, so there is no way of knowing whether the code is effective. Can the acting secretary of state clarify the real effect of the step Canada took on December 19 to cut commercial relations with South Africa?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED INCURSION INTO ANGOLA BY SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Deputy Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MacEachen:

Mr. Speaker, the action taken by the government speaks for itself. Its effect is clear. I cannot add any further detail to the announcement made by the Secretary of State for External Affairs.

May 5, 1978

Oral Questions

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORTED INCURSION INTO ANGOLA BY SOUTH AFRICAN TROOPS
Permalink

FINANCE

PC

James McPhail Gillies

Progressive Conservative

Mr. James Gillies (Don Valley):

Mr. Speaker, my question to the Minister of Finance follows directly on the questions of my colleague. Given the statement by the Secretary of State for External Affairs on December 19, that Canada is phasing out all its government-sponsored activities in South Africa, why is it possible for part of the standby credit the government is negotiating through Citibank to go to South African banks? Why did the minister say yesterday in committee that he did not put any restrictions whatsoever on where the money should come from?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   STANDBY CREDIT THROUGH CITIBANK-SUGGESTION SOUTH AFRICAN BANKS INVOLVED
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien (Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Hon. Jean Chretien (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, this question was raised yesterday in committee. I said at that time that we are negotiating with a lead bank, that is, Citibank of New York. Of course, they have to gather the credit. I said I was going to look into this question. I am not in a position to answer at the moment. When the question was put to me in the House yesterday, I did not realize the meaning of the question. I am looking into that matter now and will report to the House.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   STANDBY CREDIT THROUGH CITIBANK-SUGGESTION SOUTH AFRICAN BANKS INVOLVED
Permalink

TRADE WITH SOUTH AFRICA-ALLEGED CONTRADICTION IN GOVERNMENT POLICY

PC

James McPhail Gillies

Progressive Conservative

Mr. James Gillies (Don Valley):

Mr. Speaker, I will put my supplementary question to the right hon. Prime Minister. It seems to me there is a direct contradiction here in government policy. On one hand, the Secretary of State for External Affairs said that the government is phasing out, and will not have, any operations with South Africa of a commercial nature. Yesterday, in committee, the Minister of Finance said, "We do not put any restriction on the people who should participate in the extension of credit."

Is it the policy of the government to have one set of standards for the private sector, and another set of standards for the government in its dealings with South Africa?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   TRADE WITH SOUTH AFRICA-ALLEGED CONTRADICTION IN GOVERNMENT POLICY
Permalink
LIB

Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Right Hon. P. E. Trudeau (Prime Minister):

No. Mr. Speaker, we do not want to have two sets of standards. I think the Minister of Finance is correct in saying that he will investigate this matter. I must say that as an uninformed amateur in what is being borrowed and the way it is being done, I cannot particularly see that a man who is going to borrow from somebody else and asks him to lend him money worries where that person is getting the money. This is in the nature, I would think, of a tertiary boycott: we are going to borrow from some people, then we are going to find out where they got the money from, who lent it to them, and so on.

It seems to me that in the nature of a commercial operation, you borrow money from a respectable lender and that should settle the matter, as far as I am concerned. However, I am

prepared to be informed further by the inquiry that the Minister of Finance says he is going to embark upon.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   TRADE WITH SOUTH AFRICA-ALLEGED CONTRADICTION IN GOVERNMENT POLICY
Permalink

May 5, 1978