December 17, 1976

THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE

TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER

LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. Hon. members have, of course, expressed the desire to take a moment to pay tribute to the late Real Caouette and it is certainly appropriate that that be done forthwith. Perhaps I can then attempt to exercise some discretion in safeguarding the ordinary routine proceedings after such tributes have been paid.

Topic:   THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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LIB

Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Right Hon. P. E. Trudeau (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, the House is mourning one of its most remarkable and most respected members, the hon. member for Temiscamingue (Mr. Caouette). The news of his death has, I am sure, spread general consternation among us.

The name of Real Caouette will always be associated with the Social Credit Party of Canada which he inspired and led until failing health forced him to resign his post, barely a few months ago. We knew he was seriously ill, but because we remembered his astonishing energy, because we had grown used to his extraordinary vitality, we hardly believed his absence was final.

Mr. Speaker, the House will no longer have the pleasure or the benefit of the so colourful, so stirring, and at times so disarming interventions of Real Caouette. But under the sprightliness, the wit, the jest of his repartees, and throughout full-bodied and lusty speech, he remained imperturbably serious. It was the seriousness of his political convictions, that of the commitment he had made, once and for all, towards the people in the days when, without resources other than heroic energy and contagious enthusiasm, he was building a party that would play a considerable role on the federal political scene.

The representative value of his opinions can hardly be doubted: a whole sector of the working classes saw themselves in him as in a mirror at once faithful, ardent, and generator of hope and enthusiasm.

Thus, Mr. Speaker, the late member for Temiscamingue linked himself very closely to the people he strived so hard to serve, according to his interpretation of their aspirations. Thus was he deeply and solidly rooted in his province. Real Caouette's attachment for his region and for Quebec was embedded in the broader context of our country as a whole. Everywhere in Canada, which he dreamed of as a bilingual country, he had friends and was cordially received. Despite his

unswerving personal orthodoxy, he was open-minded. He was very much alive to every dimension of Canada, including of course the political dimensions of parliamentarianism and federalism. I wish here to pay a warm tribute to an authentic Canadian, Real Caouette.

Mr. Speaker, I invite hon. members to join me in extending the sincere condolences of the House to Mr. Caouette's family.

Topic:   THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Joe Clark (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I want to join in and associate myself and my party with the tribute just offered by the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau). [Translation]

The hon. member for Temiscamingue (Mr. Caouette) passed away after a long illness. To us his departure means the loss of a colleague and a friend, and to Canada as a whole the loss of a great political leader. Driven by dynamism, the hon. member for Temiscamingue had been able to renew the vitality of his party. He always worked to strengthen Canadian unity.

I think that one of the qualities of Real Caouette which was most evident to those of us who were privileged to know and to work with him was his remarkable ability to recognize and respond to the needs and hopes of Canadians who perhaps had some sense of feeling, at least, outside the systems and institutions of the government of Canada. He brought that firm commitment to their interests and their hopes into this Chamber, served it in the best traditions of parliamentary democracy, and established a standard of responsiveness to the people he served that is a model to all of us.

[DOT] (DIO)

In my own name and on behalf of my colleagues, I would like to extend our most sincere condolences to his family and his relatives.

Topic:   THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the New Democratic Party I should like to join with the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau) and the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Clark) in paying tribute to the memory of Real Caouette, and in extending our deepest sympathy to the members of his party and, particularly, to his family.

Like my friend, the right hon. member for Prince Albert (Mr. Diefenbaker), I remember when Real Caouette first came into this House following a byelection in 1946 and took

December 17, 1976

The Late Real Caouette

his place in the back rows of the Social Credit Party. At that time his message was a rather strong one. We wondered about it in this House, and we wondered if even the Social Credit Party of that day could take it, but history has proven that not only could his party take that message, but that he had what it took to become the leader of that movement. I know from personal conversation with him that, although his parliamentary career is best known for the years since 1962, he was always very happy about the three years he was here back in the 1940's because they enabled him to know what this place was all about.

As others have said, we are aware of his deep commitment to the social, economic and, particularly, monetary views he held. We know of his effort to speak for the underprivileged and the little people of this country in all parts of Canada, and we remember that with deep appreciation. We are also conscious of the fact that in more recent years he became an outspoken advocate of one Canada and of federalism. In particular, we appreciate the leadership he gave in his own province of Quebec. He will, indeed, be missed and we are pleased to join with others in paying our tribute to him today. We think of him also, at least those of us who are in this House, as a very warmhearted personal friend. Indeed, we shall miss him.

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the New Democratic Party, I wish to extend our most sincere condolences to the Caouette family.

Topic:   THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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SC

Joseph Adrien Henri Lambert

Social Credit

Mr. Adrien Lambert (Bellechasse):

Mr. Speaker, because the hon. member for Lotbiniere (Mr. Fortin) is on tour and was unable to come to the House this morning, he has asked me to act on his behalf to pay tribute to the man who was our leader for a very long time and to tell all my colleagues of the House how touched he was to receive the messages of all his colleagues who were able to reach him by phone or otherwise.

First, I would like to thank the right hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau) who, after learning about the death of Mr. Caouette last evening, asked for the proceedings of the House to be adjourned at eight o'clock as a sign of mourning. He should be thanked for this action, and I do so on behalf of my party and the Caouette family.

Mr. Speaker, what has just been said by the right hon. Prime Minister and the spokesmen for the Progressive Conservative Party and the New Democratic Party about Mr. Caouette has profoundly touched me. These words were obviously spoken sincerely. Of course, throughout his political life, Mr. Caouette always fought for an ideal. He wanted to bring about changes in Canadian society by proposing economic and monetary formulas in which he truly believed. I was associated with Mr. Caouette for many years. We knew each other since 1941, when he and I took part together in activities to promote Social Credit and convince the greatest possible number of people throughout Canada, to explain this transformation and propose it to Parliament.

It is rather rare that a political party is able to achieve its objectives under the same leader, but we must recognize that Mr. Caouette never gave up. The last time I visited him in hospital, he gave me this message as I left him: Continue to work in the same direction and for the same ideal. He also said: The Social Credit Party of Canada is not Real Caouette, it is a doctrine, it is a political philosophy. Continue to be faithful to this philosophy and to defend it as best you can. Of course, Mr. Caouette certainly did not please everyone. Like all politicians, he fought some rather hard battles. He had a colourful way of speaking and was outspoken, as the right hon. Prime Minister said a while ago. Mr. Caouette spoke his mind simply and frankly, and said the same things all over the country. This is why, today, people recognize that Mr. Caouette, by his activities and his thoughts, was a great Canadian, a man who worked with all his heart for Canadian unity.

Is it with a lot of emotion that I speak from the very same place as Mr. Caouette did when he spoke for the last time in the House last July when he took part in a very important debate. Once again, he had put his finger on what Canadians expect from Parliament, and we could say that he knew that it was his last speech in the House of Commons, because his message showed the experience of a man who had a very great vision of what our country must be.

Mr. Speaker, First of all I want to thank you for your kindness towards our leader and his family and I also want to thank the government and all my colleagues in the House for the tribute they paid to this great Canadian figure.

In conclusion, I should like to extend our heartfelt sympathy to Mrs. Caouette and to her children, and also to Mr. Caouette's brothers and sisters with whom I have close ties, and I know to what extent this family was united. I do hope that Mr. Caouette's example will be followed because he always endeavoured to defend the rights of the family and those of low income people. We were convinced of his vocation because he was himself convinced of what he said and he took the means to reach his objective. The thing we will recall about his life is that he was a hard worker, a man who understood that work is a tool to be used to fulfill one's objectives. He gave us this example, and I am convinced that my colleagues will join me in saying and repeating to all the people we shall meet: follow the example of Real Caouette by working and courageously defending your positions and your ideas, and you cannot go wrong.

Topic:   THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. Before pursuing the business of the House, I should like to extend my personal sympathy to Mr. Caouette's family, even if in such circumstances it is always difficult to add to what has already been said by the leaders of the parties in the House.

Like many others, I am able to recall a personal relationship with this great Canadian beginning with my first days in the House and on through various responsibilities to the day when

December 17, 1976

I was elected to this position. In any exchanges, even in his formal remarks which were most kind, the attitude always adopted and expressed by this great veteran of the House of Commons was that, since he and I were northerners, we had to work together. That was a great compliment to me from a man who had been here for so many years and had such a brilliant career when I was a new member of the House. No matter how sparkling or spectacular his career became, he always identified himself with all members of the House regardless of their rank, which speaks of his brilliance and of his kindness at the same time.

I think, when paying tribute to a man of this sort, that there are occasions when nice things are said about someone only after he has passed away, but in this case it should be remembered that all during his career and during his lifetime, regardless of disagreements on theories and political philosophies which he espoused so dearly and kept so close to his heart, there was never a time when anyone had anything unkind to say about him. Not only for his oratory and spectacular political career, but for the kind of gentleman he always was, he will be sorely missed.

Topic:   THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   THE LATE REAL CAOUETTE
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

With the permission of the House, and time being short so far as the session is concerned, knowing there are some hon. members who would not want to be deprived of even a limited opportunity to present motions pursuant to Standing Order 43, perhaps the House will agree if I allow hon. members to put motions under Standing Order 43 until 11.30 a.m. but no later, followed by the question period to be terminated at 12.15 p.m.

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Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBER
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ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE

PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Joe Clark (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I ask leave under the provisions of Standing Order 43 to move a motion on a matter of urgent and pressing importance. I move, seconded by the hon. member for Fundy-Royal (Mr. Fairweather):

That this House expresses its deep concern at the further efforts by the Prime Minister to manage the news and to limit legitimate inquiry into the public business of Canada, and asks the Prime Minister to immediately withdraw the so-called guidelines issued by his office, and to enter instead into genuine negotiations with the officers of this House and the Parliamentary Press Gallery to provide facilities and procedures to improve, rather than to restrict, the accessibility which is a basic requirement of his office.

Development Corporation Investment

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE
Sub-subtopic:   JOURNALISTS ACCESS TO PRIME MINISTER-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Such a motion cannot be presented to the House without unanimous consent. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE
Sub-subtopic:   JOURNALISTS ACCESS TO PRIME MINISTER-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE
Sub-subtopic:   JOURNALISTS ACCESS TO PRIME MINISTER-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE
Sub-subtopic:   JOURNALISTS ACCESS TO PRIME MINISTER-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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SUGGESTED RESTRICTION OF SALARY INCREASE TO AMOUNT

PC

Walter David Baker (Official Opposition House Leader; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Walter Baker (Grenville-Carleton):

Mr. Speaker, in view of the shortness of the session and the provisions of the Senate and House of Commons Act as they apply to certain members of the House, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Edmonton Centre (Mr. Paproski), the following motion under Standing Order 43:

That, in the opinion of this House the government should take immediate steps to restrict the annual salary increase of the Prime Minister, cabinet ministers, party leaders, parliamentary secretaries, the Speaker, whips and House leaders to the $2,400 permitted by the AIB guidelines.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED RESTRICTION OF SALARY INCREASE TO AMOUNT
Sub-subtopic:   PERMITTED BY ANTI-INFLATION BOARD-MOTION UNDER S O.
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. Such a motion can be presented for debate under Standing Order 43 only with the unanimous consent of the House. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED RESTRICTION OF SALARY INCREASE TO AMOUNT
Sub-subtopic:   PERMITTED BY ANTI-INFLATION BOARD-MOTION UNDER S O.
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED RESTRICTION OF SALARY INCREASE TO AMOUNT
Sub-subtopic:   PERMITTED BY ANTI-INFLATION BOARD-MOTION UNDER S O.
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December 17, 1976