October 28, 1976

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

DELAY IN SUPPLYING SWINE INFLUENZA VACCINE-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43

PC

Paul Yewchuk

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Paul Yewchuk (Athabasca):

Mr. Speaker, I rise under the provisions of Standing Order 43 to move a motion of urgent and pressing necessity. In view of the fact that this government has so badly mismanaged the supply of swine flu vaccine to provincial health departments as to render a mass vaccination program extremely difficult at this date, 1 move, seconded by the hon. member for Wetaskiwin (Mr. Schellenberger):

That this House express its displeasure at the large waste of public resources entailed by the failure of the government to supply A/New Jersey '76 vaccine to the provinces for delivery in mid-September as originally promised by the Minister of National Health and Welfare.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   DELAY IN SUPPLYING SWINE INFLUENZA VACCINE-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Such a motion pursuant to Standing Order 43 requires the unanimous consent. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   DELAY IN SUPPLYING SWINE INFLUENZA VACCINE-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   DELAY IN SUPPLYING SWINE INFLUENZA VACCINE-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   DELAY IN SUPPLYING SWINE INFLUENZA VACCINE-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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ANTI-INFLATION BOARD SUGGEST REVIEW OF BOARD'S DECISION ON TEACHERS' SALARIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43

PC

Howard Earl Johnston

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Howard Johnston (Okanagan-Kootenay):

Mr. Speaker,

I rise under the provisions of Standing Order 43 on a question of urgent and pressing necessity. As the majority of the Anti-Inflation Board's decisions concerning the legally binding teachers' salary agreements arbitrated in British Columbia in 1975 have been handed down, and as the AIB has ordered the school boards and teachers' associations of British Columbia to renegotiate the 1976 agreements, something that cannot legally be done, thus creating chaos in British Columbia's educational system, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Vancouver Quadra (Mr. Clarke):

That this House urge the Minister of Finance to order a review of these decisions.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   ANTI-INFLATION BOARD SUGGEST REVIEW OF BOARD'S DECISION ON TEACHERS' SALARIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Such a motion, pursuant to Standing Order 43, can only be presented with the unanimous consent of the House. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   ANTI-INFLATION BOARD SUGGEST REVIEW OF BOARD'S DECISION ON TEACHERS' SALARIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   ANTI-INFLATION BOARD SUGGEST REVIEW OF BOARD'S DECISION ON TEACHERS' SALARIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   ANTI-INFLATION BOARD SUGGEST REVIEW OF BOARD'S DECISION ON TEACHERS' SALARIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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INDUSTRY

PC

Jack Marshall

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jack Marshall (Humber-St. George's-St. Barbe):

Mr. Speaker, the threat of closure of Labrador Linerboard Mill in Stephenville, Newfoundland next year threatens the livelihood of some 1,000 citizens both in the plant and in woodcutting operations, but more particularly it will affect the economic and social structure of that part of the province.

I therefore move, seconded by the hon. member for Hamilton West (Mr. Alexander):

That the matter be the subject of immediate priority of the Department of Manpower and Immigration, the Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce and the Department of Regional Economic Expansion to determine the alternatives necessary to revitalize the operation of the mill, and that immediate discussion be initiated with the province of Newfoundland to assist in alternative planning.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED STUDY OF EFFECT OF CLOSING LINERBOARD MILL AT STEPHENVILLE, NEWFOUNDLAND-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. Such a motion can be presented only with the unanimous consent of the House. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED STUDY OF EFFECT OF CLOSING LINERBOARD MILL AT STEPHENVILLE, NEWFOUNDLAND-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED STUDY OF EFFECT OF CLOSING LINERBOARD MILL AT STEPHENVILLE, NEWFOUNDLAND-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED STUDY OF EFFECT OF CLOSING LINERBOARD MILL AT STEPHENVILLE, NEWFOUNDLAND-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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CRIMINAL CODE

LIB

William Ross Milne (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Communications)

Liberal

Mr. Ross Milne (Peel-Dufferin-Simcoe):

Mr. Speaker, I rise under the provisions of Standing Order 43 on a matter of urgent and pressing necessity. Hon. members will be aware of a tragic shooting in Brampton earlier this week where there were two murders and one suicide. This was the second tragedy in this city in recent months, and this particular one was caused by a person who had purchased a high powered rifle immediately before the act, allegedly specifically to commit the act.

80001-37'/2

October 28, 1976

Mr. Speaker, if parliament is to regain effective control of government spending then the practices that Mr. Henderson described must stop immediately. I am here tonight in an attempt to find out what the government's intentions are with regard to the office of the Auditor General and government spending. To allow a continuation of government spending without complete details beforehand would be tantamount to giving a blessing to continued uncontrolled government spending.

For the record, Mr. Speaker, I should like to make mention of the fact that in its references to the Auditor General there is no mention whatsoever of Crown corporations and how the government intends to bring about more effective control within these corporations. Air Canada is a prime example of a Crown corporation which is plagued by poor financial administration, and incidentally is audited by a private firm on contract with the government. When one takes into consideration that there are eight Crown corporations and public instrumentalities of which the Auditor General is neither the auditor nor joint auditor, then, Mr. Speaker, I say that the government is abrogating its responsibility and should take the necessary action to rectify the situation.

The government has a moral obligation to the people of Canada to deal effectively with the financial fiasco it has created. When the Auditor General stated that the present state of financial management and control systems of departments and agencies of the Government of Canada is significantly below acceptable standards of quality and effectiveness,

I am sure that he expected action from the government to change this state of affairs. Furthermore, Mr. Speaker, in replying to a question from the chairman of the Public Accounts Committee as to whether or not the Auditor General could assure parliament that the financial statements of the government are accurate, the Auditor General replied:

We feel very strongly about the fact that unless the systems are corrected the day may well come when I cannot give a clear certificate on the accounts of Canada.

Adjournment Debate

With that statement in mind I can only re-emphasize my earlier comments that the government should make clear its intentions with regard to the office of the Auditor General.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Sub-subtopic:   PROPOSED REINSTATEMENT OF BILL C-83 TO DEAL WITH GUN CONTROL-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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?

Mr. Jacques-L. Trudel@Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Winnipeg South Centre (Mr. McKenzie) has expressed concern about this matter on several occasions. He raised it in the debate on the Speech from the Throne. He also asked a question on October 25 which the minister answered and, within the format at that particular time, stated that there would be legislation. I should like to reiterate his comments dealing with the implementation of the Wilson Committee recommendations when he stated that a new auditor general's act will be tabled in the House very shortly.

The legislation has now been drafted after very careful consideration of each of the recommendations contained in the report of the Wilson Committee. Some of the proposals contained in the report are complex, and required extensive consultation among the parties involved, including the Auditor General of Canada. I can assure the hon. member that the legislation will clarify the duties and responsibilities of that officer of Parliament and will provide him with a better means of fulfilling his important function.

I am happy to say that the legislation fully reflects the spirit of the Wilson Committee report and that the consultations that I have mentioned have produced what are felt to be significant contributions to the quality of the legislation. I am convinced that, following the parliamentary review of this bill-and I hope the hon. member will participate-all members will agree that we will have the most modern and comprehensive law concerning the role and responsibility of a parliamentary auditor which is in existence anywhere. In conclusion, Mr. Speaker, since I have mentioned that the legislation will shortly be presented to the House, i am sure you will agree that further discussion of the details of the new act should be deferred until that time.

Motion agreed to and the House adjourned at 10.15 p.m.

572

October 28, 1976

Adjournment Debate

availability of the proper vaccine for adequate protection of the Canadian population against influenza.

We appreciate very much the presence in the Chamber at this late hour of the Minister of National Health and Welfare (Mr. Lalonde). I am sure he will shed some light on this subject.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Sub-subtopic:   PROPOSED REINSTATEMENT OF BILL C-83 TO DEAL WITH GUN CONTROL-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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LIB

Marc Lalonde (Minister responsible for the Status of Women; Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Hon. Marc Lalonde (Minister of National Health and Welfare):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to thank the hon. member for Parkdale (Mr. Haidasz) for giving us an opportunity to discuss this subject. I wish that he, as an able medical doctor, had been consulted by the CBC in which case the corporation might not have included an irresponsible statement in its program on the subject last Monday.

This afternoon I tabled the most recent report of the National Advisory Committee on Immunizing Agents. These recommendations relate to the 1976-77 influenza immunization program, and I have accepted them in their entirety. They have been transmitted to the provincial ministers of health for their information and I have expressed my hope the provinces will look upon the committee's recommendations with favor.

It will be noted that the recommendations are substantially the same as those presented following the committee's meeting in June. The only essential differences are specific recommendations for the use of bivalent vaccine in children suffering from chronic neuromuscular disorders, cancer, and conditions involving biological defence mechanisms. While routine vaccination of school children is not recommended, special formulations of the vaccines are being prepared for those under twenty years of age with specific chronic illnesses. In reviewing its recommendations the committee endorsed the utilization of vaccine, both bivalent and monovalent, as supplies become available. The committee gave due consideration to alternatives to its recommended program, especially the question of stockpiling monovalent A/New Jersey vaccine and its utilization if further evidence of "swine influenza" activity became available.

The committee did not consider stockpiling to be a viable option for a variety of reasons: first, because influenza caused by a new virus spreads throughout the population with great rapidity and the possibility of receiving a sufficiently early warning by the isolation of virus from the first case is very remote. Secondly, laboratory identification of the virus takes a minimum of ten days and further time will elapse to investigate the case in order to ensure that it has been spread from person to person. A third important factor is that it has been estimated a minimum time lag of five to eight weeks is likely after a decision to mobilize stockpiled vaccine before the vaccine can be administered to all those wishing to receive it and they have had time to develop protective levels of antibody.

All lots of influenza vaccine sold in Canada must be approved by the health protection branch on a lot by lot basis. No lot will be released unless it meets the high Canadian standards required of all vaccines. I can assure all hon. mem-

bers that there will be no weakening of these standards. The first lots of vaccine were approved for distribution today.

AUDITOR GENERAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF RECOMMENDATIONS OF INDEPENDENT REVIEW COMMITTEE-GOVERNMENT POSITION '

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Sub-subtopic:   PROPOSED REINSTATEMENT OF BILL C-83 TO DEAL WITH GUN CONTROL-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink

October 28, 1976