October 27, 1976

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

PUBLIC SERVICE

PC

Walter David Baker (Official Opposition House Leader; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Walter Baker (Grenville-Carleton):

Mr. Speaker, 1 rise under the provisions of Standing Order 43 to put a question of urgent and pressing necessity. In view of the importance of the principle of decentralization of departments and agencies of the Government of Canada to those areas which benefit, but also to public servants and their families who are affected thereby, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Yukon (Mr. Nielsen):

That the President of the Treasury Board make a statement on motions at the earliest opportunity:

(a) Disclosing the long range plans of the government for such decentralization including the number of employees and the agencies to be decentralized;

(b) The basis upon which it has consulted and will consult with public service representatives, including the notice period to employees it considers appropriate;

(c) Its plans to absorb into other agencies those public servants who for legitimate family, personal or other reasons cannot move;

so that the people of Canada and the Public servants involved can be assured that there is a full public disclosure of a master plan.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR DISCLOSURE OF PLANS FOR DECENTRALIZATION OF SERVICE-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. Such a motion pursuant to Standing Order 43 can be presented to the House only with unanimous consent. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR DISCLOSURE OF PLANS FOR DECENTRALIZATION OF SERVICE-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR DISCLOSURE OF PLANS FOR DECENTRALIZATION OF SERVICE-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
Permalink

PENSION ACT

NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, because Remembrance Day is only two weeks away I believe there is urgency to this motion. That is why I ask leave to present it under Standing Order 43. I therefore move, seconded by the hon. member for Timiskaming (Mr. Peters):

That this House urges the government to introduce an amendment to the Pension Act to provide for pro-rata pensions to be paid as of right to widows of veterans whose disability pensions were less than 48 per cent, as recommended in the Woods Report, in the Hermann Report, and in several reports of the

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs, and that notice of the introduction of such an amendment be given prior to Remembrance Day, 1976.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION OF PRO-RATA PENSION FOR WIDOWS OF VETERANS WHOSE PENSION LESS THAN 48 PERCENT-MOTION UNDER S O.
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION OF PRO-RATA PENSION FOR WIDOWS OF VETERANS WHOSE PENSION LESS THAN 48 PERCENT-MOTION UNDER S O.
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION OF PRO-RATA PENSION FOR WIDOWS OF VETERANS WHOSE PENSION LESS THAN 48 PERCENT-MOTION UNDER S O.
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Standing Order 43 requires the unanimous consent of the House for the presentation of such a motion. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION OF PRO-RATA PENSION FOR WIDOWS OF VETERANS WHOSE PENSION LESS THAN 48 PERCENT-MOTION UNDER S O.
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION OF PRO-RATA PENSION FOR WIDOWS OF VETERANS WHOSE PENSION LESS THAN 48 PERCENT-MOTION UNDER S O.
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION OF PRO-RATA PENSION FOR WIDOWS OF VETERANS WHOSE PENSION LESS THAN 48 PERCENT-MOTION UNDER S O.
Permalink

CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

PC

Jacques Lavoie

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jacques Lavoie (Hochelaga):

Mr. Speaker, under S.O. 43, I ask the unanimous consent of the House to discuss an urgent matter.

Considering that the CBC refuses to broadcast advertisements designed to inform the consumer, and I am referring to the French advertisement sponsored by credit unions and the Consumer Protection Board under the slogan "Le gros bon sens"; considering also that the privately owned TV network saw fit to air those advertisements which are partly free, thus recognizing the importance of informing the consumer; and finally, considering that the state network gets subsidies from public funds and that its audience is entitled to the same services, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Joliette (Mr. La Salle):

That the House unanimously urge the Secretary of State to suggest that the CBC change its code of ethics to allow the broadcasting of advertisements which consumers are entitled to.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED CHANGE IN POLICY TO PERMIT BROADCAST OF CONSUMER ANNOUNCEMENTS-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. Under the provisions of Standing Order 43, this motion requires the unanimous consent of the House. Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED CHANGE IN POLICY TO PERMIT BROADCAST OF CONSUMER ANNOUNCEMENTS-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED CHANGE IN POLICY TO PERMIT BROADCAST OF CONSUMER ANNOUNCEMENTS-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

October 27, 1976

Advance Payments for Crops

across the way can come up with valid, constructive and well reasoned suggestions for modifications to the legislation, the Minister of Agriculture for Canada will be the first to accept those ideas and try to incorporate them in the legislation so that this bill can be, in fact, the very best bill possible for Canadian farmers all across the country.

One other point hon. gentlemen across the way made had to do with the matter of interest charges. I shall not deal with that extensively because the answer is already on the record in the intervention made earlier today by the minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board. 1 suppose the point opposition members are trying to make is that somehow this legislation treats farmers in eastern Canada, and farmers who are not grain producers in the Wheat Board area, differently from the cash payment legislation relating to specific grain, which legislation has been on the statute books for some time.

The point is that there has been an effort in both pieces of legislation dealing with grain and other crops to treat producers in exactly the same way, especially in relation to interest. If the advance is repaid in the normal fashion as contemplated by the legislation and as has been demonstrated by our experience with the grain legislation, then of course interest is not payable. But in a case where the advance is in default, or where the producer chooses to repay it in terms of cash instead of the delivery of crop, then of course the advance does begin to attract interest.

It is probably important once again that members know the history of that particular provision which really results from the experience with the grain legislation. Originally the cash advance legislation dealing with grain did not contain a provision calling for the payment of interest. It was upon the recommendation of farmers and farm organizations that that provision was put in, in order to avoid what otherwise would be an abuse of legislation if an advance were taken with no intention of delivering the grain but rather in order to have the advance as an interest-free loan to be used for other purposes.

Farmers and farm organizations in western Canada perceived that as an abuse of the legislation, and recommended that the cash advance legislation relating to grain should be changed to recognize that problem. The amendments were made to the legislation a considerable time ago. Obviously they have been very well received and very widely approved. The legislation the Minister of Agriculture is now presenting is of course legislation which follows upon exactly the same principle. It does not specifically relate to grain, but of course expands the principle so that it will relate to a number of other crops across Canada whether they be produced in western Canada or in any other part of the country.

I think the principle the Minister of Agriculture has put before the House in the form of this particular legislation is very good; it is sound. This is a principle which I think farmers in parts of Canada who are not used to the grains industry on the prairies will welcome when they see this kind of provision, and I know producers across the country are very anxious to see this legislation proceed through the House of Commons and the Standing Committee on Agriculture so that the advantages of cash advances for crops, other than grains, will become available to farmers across the country.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED CHANGE IN POLICY TO PERMIT BROADCAST OF CONSUMER ANNOUNCEMENTS-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
PC

John (Jack) Henry Horner

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. H. Horner (Crowfoot):

Mr. Speaker, in rising to take part in the debate on Bill C-2 I cannot help but note that the hon. member ended his remarks by wishing the bill very speedy passage through the House because of the great need for this legislation across Canada. There would have been a great deal more speed had he not recited all the little goodies he thinks his great idol has brought before agriculture in Canada. He even went so far as to suggest that it was a great stroke of business to change the Wheat Board Act so that the final payment cheques would not go out in the same year. He did not say that the reason that happened was that they were paid out on October 1 of one year because there was an election on October 30 and they wanted to make certain that the farmers knew who was paying out the money. It kind of backfired that time.

Then he went on to suggest that the speakers on this side of the House who held up the grain stabilization bill in 1971 would rue the day. He did not say that any astute statistician or mathematician who studied the facts should come to the opposition members and thank us because the price of wheat was so low that in no way could we have been wrong in holding up that piece of legislation in 1971.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED CHANGE IN POLICY TO PERMIT BROADCAST OF CONSUMER ANNOUNCEMENTS-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
LIB

Ralph Goodale (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. Goodale:

Mr. Speaker, would the hon. member permit a question?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED CHANGE IN POLICY TO PERMIT BROADCAST OF CONSUMER ANNOUNCEMENTS-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
PC

John (Jack) Henry Horner

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Horner:

I will permit a queston in due course, but not right now. You had 25 minutes to speak and have allowed me only five. At the time of the stabilization bill the price of wheat was so low that there was no way the farmer could benefit from stabilization at that low price. When it was passed in the last session, at a time when the price of wheat was $5 a bushel, the concept was different. All farmers who participated in the grain stabilization program should be truly grateful for the Conservative party and the work it did. I might mention also in all fairness the assistance we received from the NDP on that particular point. They like to claim all the credit, and I think I am being over-generous in giving them a little.

The interesting thing about Bill C-2 is that this is the first piece of federal legislation which also assists the Alberta treasury branch and says that the Alberta treasury branch will be considered as a bank. There have been many debates before in this House of Commons and I have often argued in respect of similar legislation that the Alberta treasury branch should be included.

I well remember when a former minister of agriculture, my friend's predecessor, the then hon. member for Medicine Hat, and I argued that point. He was unreceptive to it. So I want to thank the minister. He has learned from the errors of his predecessor. However, he has not learned the lesson in respect of his grand design about controlling everything. This piece of legislation smacks of a little bit more control being sought by the federal government. Mr. Speaker, may I call it six o'clock.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   SUGGESTED CHANGE IN POLICY TO PERMIT BROADCAST OF CONSUMER ANNOUNCEMENTS-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink

October 27, 1976