October 19, 1976

?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
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SC

Léonel Beaudoin

Social Credit

Mr. Leonel Beaudoin (Richmond):

Mr. Speaker, I am glad to join in with the two previous speakers, on behalf of the Social Credit Party of Canada, to congratulate the hon. member for Malpeque (Mr. MacLean) for the beautiful speech he made last night. In the person of the hon. member for Malpeque, Mr. J. Angus MacLean, the House of Commons loses an extraordinary man, an every day man of duty and also a man respected by all. I know he will surely fulfill other as honourable functions and that he will be as devoted as he was in the House of Commons. Our wishes of success and good health be with him.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
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PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Joe Clark (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, we in my party, of course, have particular cause to appreciate the steadiness, the judgment, the integrity and the very good

[Mr. MacEachen.J

humour and sense of comradeship of Angus MacLean, the member of this parliament for Malpeque. He came to the House of Commons after a distinguished career as a bomber pilot, a career which won him the DFC. After a remarkable history of escape during the war he has served in this House as a respected member of the ministry of my colleague and predecessor the right hon. member for Prince Albert (Mr. Diefenbaker). He has impressed all of us who have had the privilege of knowing him with both his very warm human qualities and his capacity to offer solid, considered judgments and advice.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
Permalink
PC

Charles Joseph Clark (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Clark:

1 know I speak for all of us who have had the privilege of serving in the leadership of my party when I say there are few members whose advice has been more helpful during the quarter century of service of Angus MacLean than the advice of the member of parliament for Malpeque.

While we in this House of Commons may differ in the degree of force with which we wish him well in future endeavours, that enthusiasm is unreserved in this party, and what might be seen now as a loss for the House of Commons of Canada is very much a gain for the province of Prince Edward Island.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I hope hon. members will permit me to just add a word if I may. Not much can be added to the wonderful tributes that have been paid so deservedly to the Hon. Angus MacLean. May I only say that the Management and Members Services Committee is a recent addition to the roster of standing committees of the House and the work of that committee provides a service which potentially benefits or should benefit all members of the House. It benefits the Speaker of the House directly in the difficult decisions of attempting to strike a proper balance between those services which members require to fulfil their obligations and those which they deserve in terms of the financial burden of the estimates of the House.

For that committee to reach its maximum potential it really required in its infancy a chairman who ought probably to have come from the opposition side or at least have been able to demonstrate a very objective point of view, one who could bring to that post many years of experience both in and out of cabinet as well as a reputation for objective judgment and the respect of all of his colleagues. At the same time, that person should enjoy a reputation for a sane and sensible hand on the throttle.

I think we have all been deeply fortunate that we found such a chairman in the Hon. Angus MacLean. I wish to express my appreciation and that, I know, of all members for this latter aspect of a career which has been a great donation to the House of Commons.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

October 19, 1976

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please. I am sure all hon. members would also want to know that, although Room 16 is not quite large enough to accommodate everyone at lunch, I have invited a few of the hon. members' close colleagues, the members of that Management and Members Services Committee, as well as some of those who toiled with him in the Privy Council when he was there, to join us for lunch immediately. Unfortunately, 1 cannot invite everybody but I thought all hon. members would want to know we are not letting the occasion go unmarked.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   RESIGNATION OF MEMBER FOR MALPEQUE
Permalink

ANTI-INFLATION BOARD TABLING OF COPIES OF REFERENCES TO THE ADMINISTRATOR

LIB

Donald Stovel Macdonald (Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Hon. Donald S. Macdonald (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to table copies of references from the Anti-Inflation Board to the Administrator under subsection 17(2) of the Anti-Inflation Act.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   ANTI-INFLATION BOARD TABLING OF COPIES OF REFERENCES TO THE ADMINISTRATOR
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SPEECH FROM THE THRONE


The House resumed, from Monday, October 18, consideration of the motion of Mr. Maurice Harquail for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session.


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prince Albert):

Mr. Speaker, as one who has been a member of this House for many years I do not recall a previous occasion when there has been such an outpouring of praise, and deserved praise, as that to which we have just listened. Angus Mac Lean served in my cabinet with distinction. Above all, however, as I look back over the years I see him during those dark days of war establishing a record, an Odyssey of gallantry and courage, that will be read by this and future generations with appreciation for what he did and the honour he brought to their country. It is on occasions such as this that this House rises to its greatest heights, when in the cathedral of devotion and appreciation we let those who have served know that they have that "something" that one can earn in the House of Commons, that is, the appreciation of one's fellow members.

Having said that, sir, it would be natural that I should refer to the events of yesterday, and I do so not having to gild the lily in any way. By-elections, such as that which took place yesterday, reveal something that was dealt with by the hon. Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Clark) during his very able and eloquent address; namely, that members of the Liberal Party do not have to conduct a post mortem as to the reasons for what happened. They do not have to say "Who killed Cock Robin?" All they have to do is look at the empty seat.

I am in a particularly kindly humour today, Mr. Speaker. I am going to quote Humpty Dumpty with slight changes. I am

The Address-Mr. Diefenbaker not going to say "All the king's horses and all the king's men cannot put Humpty Dumpty together again" because that might annoy the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau)-the reference to the monarchy-so I will not do that. I therefore substitute: "All the multitudinous public relations men, speech writers, staff workers and $3 million worth of servants around the prime ministerial throne will not be able to put the Prime Minister together again."

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

I recall a famous occasion when the cabinet met at Meach Lake, so that nothing would be revealed.

I can tell the government that nothing is less secret than such a secret meeting. I learned that over the years. The various ministers-the Minister of Justice (Mr. Basford), the Minister of Finance (Mr. Macdonald) and others-all said, "I am not to blame; I didn't do it; I am not responsible." They were of one mind but did not designate the one responsible. I submit that possibly the answer was given by the Prime Minister, on one of his peripatetic pilgrimages undertaken to restore his image and that of the government, when he said in New Brunswick, the situation is such that many Liberals are not as proud as they used to be to be Liberals. That's saying a lot- that is my observation. Finally, he pronounced as his considered opinion that a lot are running for cover; a lot are tired out, worn down, out of steam. You cannot improve on that, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Now, Sir, I must say a word about the new cabinet, about additions to it and repairs to it. I must refer to one minister particularly-I am sorry he has left-the hon. member for Cape Breton Highlands-Canso (Mr. MacEachen) who now is President of the Privy Council. Sir, he is a parliamentarian of distinction. Just when he was getting used to his job and beginning to understand the intricacies of foreign affairs, he was demoted. I can hear him say with Cardinal Woolsey: had I but served God as diligently as I served the king, he would not have given me over in my grey years. Let me say this about the minister: It was not because of him that Canada is regarded by many countries as a fellow-traveller country. He maintained the principles for which this nation stood in the past, and I regret that he has given up the job. I know his genial successor will do his very best. He has a tremendous capacity for absorbing information and, in addition, for letting parliament know.

I was interested in the questions asked earlier this morning concerning secrecy. Mr. Speaker, the government opposite has an all-time record for concealment and equivocation. Although there is incorporated in the Speech from the Throne one of those generalizations concerning the expectation of the possibility of a hope for a change, I see not that repentance which should be evidenced by the government following the Rudnicki case. At one time those high in the echelons of the public service were servants of the people. They used to sign their

The Address-Mr. Diefenbaker letters, "I have the honour to be, Sir, your obedient servant." They do not do it any more. They do not tell the people that they want to be their everlasting masters. That attitude was revealed in the Rudnicki case. Somebody took a document and stamped it confidential. Why, if all the papers marked confidential by the present government were not to be seen by those outside the cabinet who have eyes to see, there would be a great reduction in the amount of paper work in this country.

I recall being bitterly condemned by those who were then in opposition for having produced a document which the Department of Trade and Commerce, under the St. Laurent administration, had hidden. It contained information showing how seriously the economic conditions of Canada were being undermined. I did not get the document from the department: a member of the press handed it to me. I was condemned in 1958 for the horrible conduct of revealing its contents. In 1976, we are concerned about the Rudnicki case. Mr. Speaker, the government does not intend to appeal the decision; it is afraid to appeal.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
?

An hon. Member:

It knows it would lose.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

We have seen the end, I hope, of attempts by the government to cover up with a rubber stamp.

Sir, what can one say about the new members of the cabinet? I like some of them very much; I will not deal with them all. Have you ever seen such musical chairs? Around and round they go; where they stop only the Prime Minister knows.

I know how difficult it is for the Prime Minister to choose; but he will not have that difficulty in Winnipeg. I had hoped the hon. member for St. Boniface (Mr. Guay) would stay in the chamber. He was here a moment ago. Sir, there will be no difficulty at all in finding a successor to the former minister of national defence. It will be the genial member for St. Boniface who belongs, on the prairies, to a species rapidly becoming extinct.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
?

An hon. Member:

Don't count on that, John.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink

October 19, 1976