July 13, 1976

LIB

Fabian Hugh Poulin (Parliamentary Secretary to the Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. Hugh Poulin (Parliamentary Secretary to Solicitor General):

For the years 1970 to 1975-Nil. All psychological cases are referred to Dorchester Penitentiary.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   PSYCHOLOGISTS-WESTMORELAND
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PC

Mr. MacKay (Progressive Conservative Party Caucus Chair)

Progressive Conservative

1. Were subsidies paid to companies for dragger construction in 1975 and, if so (a) in what amount (b) to which companies?

2. How much was paid in subsidies to processing plants in 1975?

3. Were licences allocated to companies owning draggers over 65 feet and, if so (a) how many (b) to which companies?

4. How many (a) mid-water trawl (b) herring seining licences were allocated in 1975?

5. (a) What is the composition of the Fisheries Prices Support Board (b) what are its duties (c) in what manner does it function?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   DRAGGER CONSTRUCTION
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LIB

George Baker (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment)

Liberal

Mr. George Baker (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of State (Fisheries)):

1. Yes, the following subsidies were paid to shipbuilders for the construction of company owned draggers (trawlers) in 1975-1976: Marystown Shipyard Ltd., Marystown, Newfoundland: Tele-Direct Ltd., Montreal, P.Q., $625,000; National Sea Products Ltd., Halifax, Nova Scotia, $1,533,000; John Penney & Sons Ltd., Ramea, Newfoundland, $900,000. Verrault Navigation Inc., De Mechins, P.Q.: Les Pecheries du Golfe St-Laurent Inc., Cape-aux-Meules, Iles-de-la-Madeleine, P.Q., $272,000.

Pelagic Pacific Industries Ltd., Victoria, B.C.; Pacific Trident Fishing Co. Ltd., Tofino, B.C., $115,000. Ferguson Industries Limited, Pictou, Nova Scotia; Canso Seafoods Ltd., North Sydney, Nova Scotia, $1,988,000. Haste Fisheries Ltd., North Vancouver, B.C.: Haste Fisheries Ltd., $105,-

000. Jack & Jerry Liddle, Wheatley, Ontario: Liddle Brothers Fishery Ltd., Wheatley, Ontario, $7,900.

2. $19,503,951.

3. Yes. (a) Newfoundland Region, 87 licences; Maritimes Region, 104 licences, (b) These licences are issued in accordance with established licencing procedures and the guidelines developed by the Atlantic Groundfish Licencing Committee. The name of a licence holder, whether it is that

July 13, 1976

of a company or an individual, is considered to be confidential and it is not the policy to make this information public.

4. (a) Midwater trawl licences included in the above totals are: Newfoundland Region: Midwater trawl only, 1; Maritimes Region: Midwater trawl and Otter trawl combination, 33; Midwater trawl and Purse Seine combination, 7; Midwater trawl only, 6. (b) Newfoundland Region: Herring Purse Seine, 13; Maritimes Region: Herring Purse Seine, 70; of which seven are also licenced to fish midwater trawl.

5. (a) The Fisheries Prices Support Board is composed of six members. They are appointed by the Governor-inCouncil to hold office during pleasure, (b) The Board is responsible for investigating and where appropriate, recommending action under the Fisheries Prices Support Act, to support prices of fisheries products where declines have been experienced. The basic principle of the legislation is to help cushion the sharp declines in prices and consequent loss of income due to causes beyond the control of the fishermen or the industry. The Board serves as an advisory board to the Minister, (c) The Board, subject to approval of the Governor-in-Council, is empowered to purchase fishery products at prescribed prices. The Board may also pay deficiency payments to producers of fishery products equal to the difference between a prescribed price and the average price at which products were sold.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   DRAGGER CONSTRUCTION
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?

Mr. MacKenzie

Has Interimco Ltd. of 1206-100 Bronson Ave., Ottawa, Ontario been awarded any CIDA or CUSO contracts or contracts with any department, Crown corporation or agency since January 1, 1975 and, if so (a) with which department, Crown corporation or agency (b) in what amount (c) for what purpose?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   INTERIMCO CONTRACTS
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (President of the Privy Council):

I am informed by the Department of Supply and Services as follows: (a) Canadian Commercial Corporation, (b) $4,583. (c) Farm equipment spares for India under CIDA Grant Aid Program. Several other Departments, Crown Corporations and Agencies: Nil.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   INTERIMCO CONTRACTS
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PC

Mr. Stevens

Progressive Conservative

1. What was the total amount expended, itemized to reflect the purpose of all main expenditures, by the government directly or indirectly on the Stol Air Transport System up to March 31, 1976?

2. As of that date, what further monies have been committed, itemized to reflect the purpose of all main expenditures, with respect to the project?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   STOL AIR TRANSPORT SYSTEM-EXPENDITURES
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LIB

Ralph Goodale (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Ralph E. Goodale (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport):

1.

$000's $000's

Expenditures to March 31, 1976 Capital

Aircraft, Avionics, Air

Navigation and Instrument

Landing Systems 7,895

Order Paper Questions

Stolports 5,442

Application and Market

Studies 1,154

Technical Trials and Studies 752

Total Capital

Operation and Maintenance

Stolport Operations 2,730

Stol Evaluation 333

Public Affairs 536

Air Tran'sit Operations 5,210

8,809

Less: Revenue (Rental of

Aircraft) 702

Net Operating

Total

2. Estimated Additional Expenditures as of March 31, 1976

Operation and Maintenance

Stolport Operations 395

Stol Evaluation 140

Public Affairs 45

Air Transit Operations 504

1,084

Less: Revenue (Rental of

Aircraft) 35

Total

15,243

8,107

23,350

1,049

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   STOL AIR TRANSPORT SYSTEM-EXPENDITURES
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PC

Mr. Cossitt

Progressive Conservative

1. Was there a fire at the Governor General's summer residence and, if so (a) on what date (b) what is the estimated amount of damage to the (i) building (ii) contents?

2. Was there an automatic fire alarm system on the premises at the time of the fire and, if so, did it fail to function?

3. Prior to the fire, was the government and, in particular, the Department of Public Works and the Dominion Fire Commissioner aware that the system was not functioning and, if so, for what period of time?

4. During the past five years were (a) fire prevention inspections of the premises made by the office of the Dominion Fire Commissioner (b) tests made of the automatic fire alarm system and, if so, in each case, on what dates?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   FIRE-GOVERNOR GENERAL'S RESIDENCE
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LIB

Charles Mills (Bud) Drury (Minister of Public Works; Minister of State for Science and Technology)

Liberal

Hon. C. M. Drury (Minister of Public Works):

1. Yes. (a) Monday, February 2nd, 1976. (b) (i) $1,053,000; (ii) $150,000.

2. Yes, there was an automatic fire alarm system. Yes, it failed to function.

3. Early in November 1975, the system was reported unserviceable. On November 13, 1975, a work order was issued to a company specializing in fire alarms for inspection and repairs. As of the date of the fire, the work had not been performed.

4. (a) An inspection was made by the Dominion Fire Commissioner's staff on February 21, 1973. (b) The auto-

July 13, 1976

Order Paper Questions

matic fire alarm was tested February 22, 1973, by the Dominion Fire Commissioner's staff. In addition, the system was tested and maintenance carried out by service contract in 1970, 1971, 1972 and 1973. In 1974 and 1975 an annual inspection including testing was carried out by service contract. The last test in March 1975, indicated that the system was in operating condition and no repairs were required.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   FIRE-GOVERNOR GENERAL'S RESIDENCE
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PC

Mr. Stevens

Progressive Conservative

1. As at March 31 (a) 1946 (b) 1963 (c) 1968 (d) 1974 (e) 1975 (f) 1976, what was the total number of government employees including the following arms of the government, ministries of state and departments, departmental corporations, administrative, regulatory and special funds and agencies, government enterprises, and the Armed Services and what was the total employment under each category?

2. What was the total number working for the government under contract or other arrangement but who are not classed as employees?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   FEDERAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (President of the Privy Council):

am informed by Statistics Canada and the Department of National Defence as follows: 1. The data appearing on the attached table includes only civilian personnel. The only information available for 1946 is a total figure of those employed by departments and departmental corporations. For March 1963, the number employed by administrative, regulatory and special funds is included in the number employed by government enterprises. The number of federal government employees as of March 1976 has not been published as yet, however, we have included in the tabled figures for December 1975 and estimated figures for March 1976. Military personnel was as follows: (a) 212,692; (b) 123,694; (c) 101,572; (d) 81,624; (e) 79,354; (f) 79,073.

2. In so far as Statistics Canada is concerned, the total number of persons working under personal service contracts during the years cited was: (a) No data available; (b) No data available; (c) 10; (d) 36; (e) 42; (f) 21.

Federal Government Employment-Number of Employees

Ministries of Administrative Total - State and Departmental regulatory and General Government Years Departments Corporations special funds Government Enterprises Total1946 (March 31) 120,5570) Data not available 1963 (March 31) 184,732 14,089 129,819(2) 328,640(December 31) 187,479 14,540 4,998 207,017 127,011 334,0281968 (March 31) 225,248 10,263 7,248 242,759 126,595 369,3541975 (March 31) 291,861 15,227 12,517 319,605 133,936 453,541(December 31) 297,316 16,376 12,888 326,580 132,046 458,6261976 (March 31)<3> 306,480 15,788 13,000 335,268 132,000 467,268

0) With the exception of Wartime Prices and Trade Board this figure excludes statistics for other Boards and Commissions and Crown Companies, the personnel of which does not come within the jurisdiction of the Civil Service Act.

<2>

Includes administrative, regulatory and special funds.

<3>

Estimated Figures.

note: Figures for 1974 were reported in the answer to Question No. 3,794.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   FEDERAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Mr. Stevens

Progressive Conservative

In each fiscal year ended (a) 1974 (b) 1975 (c) 1976, what was the total number of government employees (i) discharged or dismissed (ii) retired (iii) hired?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   NUMBER OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES DISMISSED, RETIRED AND HIRED IN 1974-76
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (President of the Privy Council):

am informed by the Public Service Commission as follows: Statistics are for calendar years 1974 and 1975 and apply to employees subject to the Public Service Employment Act. No statistics are available for 1976. N.B.-The terms used in our answer are consistent with the wording of the Public Service Employment Act.

1974 1975

(i) Released for breach of dis-

cipline or misconduct Released for incompetence or 95 71incapacity Released for abandonment of 168 140position 548 447Rejected during probation 695 685Revocation of appointment 15 39Total 1,521 1,382

(ii) Retirement

at age 65 and over 2,182 1,567elective at 55-65 2,372 2,763medical grounds 1,022 744Total 5,576 5,074(iii) Appointed to the Public Service 46,567 36,251I am informed by the Department of National Defence a follows: (a), (b) and (c) Military Personnel: Fiscal Year Discharged Dismissed (Note 1) (Note 2) Retired (Note 3) Hired1973/74 6,375 7 2,638 8,0591974/75 8,357 5 3,160 9,4451975/76 8,597 6 2,686 11.099

Note 1: Discharged includes voluntary releases without entitlement to an annuity, medically unfit personnel, deaths etc.

Note 2: Dismissed means compulsory release due to misdemeanors etc.

Note 3: Retired includes service completion or voluntary release with entitled to an annuity.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   NUMBER OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES DISMISSED, RETIRED AND HIRED IN 1974-76
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PC

Mr. Brisco

Progressive Conservative

1. How long have the Unemployment Insurance Commission offices at 1155 Robson Street, Vancouver, British Columbia been vacant?

2. How many floors were vacated?

3. What are the plans to re-occupy the premises and by whom?

4. How long is the lease or rental arrangements for the floor space and what is the cost?

5. For how many months has payment been made for rent for the vacated premises?

6. How many government offices have been vacated in Vancouver in which rental payments are still being made?

7. In what location are the offices and what is the cost to date?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   PUBLIC WORKS-VACANT OFFICE SPACE, VANCOUVER, B.C.
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LIB

Charles Mills (Bud) Drury (Minister of Public Works; Minister of State for Science and Technology)

Liberal

Hon. C. M. Drury (Minister of Public Works):

1. The U.I.C. did not completely vacate the building but reduced their requirements on December 15, 1975 due to the establishment of expanded service elsewhere in Vancouver. Occupancy of 10,455 rentable square feet has been retained on the first floor together with 4,480 square feet rentable in the basement for storage.

Order Paper Questions

2. The entire second floor-10,914 square feet and a portion of the third floor-4,794 square feet for a total of 15,708 rentable square feet.

3. The vacant space was included in the Regional Plan for Vancouver. The present proposal is for Statistics Canada to occupy the area, pending finalization of the Regional Plan.

4. 1155 Robson Street is a Crown-owned building and is therefore not subject to any lease or rental arrangement with the private sector.

5. Not applicable. Please refer to No. 4 above.

6. See statement following.

7. See statement following.

Location

Lease Vacancy

Date Time

Terminate Annual Rent Sq. Ft. Vacated Frame Remarks

18th Floor 1/5/75

1050 W. Pender Vancouver, B.C.

30/4/79 $15,532.00 1,451 1/3/76 2 months Client: M & I

Reason for vacancy:

(a) change in M & I program

(b) being utilized as "swing space"

Has been utilized by:

(1) Anti-inflation Board

(2) Prime Minister's Cabinet Meeting

(3) Proposed occupancy P.S.C. Language School May 1/76.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   PUBLIC WORKS-VACANT OFFICE SPACE, VANCOUVER, B.C.
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PC

Mr. Forrestall

Progressive Conservative

1. How many international treaties, conventions, accords, etc., have been signed by Canada but have not been (a) ratified (b) implemented by either the (i) provinces (ii) Parliament of Canada or the executive of the government of Canada?

2. What treaties are involved and on what date did Canada sign them?

3. How many such arrangements has Canada ratified but have not implemented, if any?

4. What consideration is Canada giving to implementing the recommendation of the Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons on the Constitution of Canada (1972) that international treaties be ratified by Parliament rather than the Executive and the Crown?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   TREATIES
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LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

1. Ratification following signature is only one of several ways in which an international agreement may enter into force for Canada. Many bilateral agreements enter into force either on signature or on some

other date in accordance with procedures specified in the agreement. Most multilateral treaties require either signature followed by ratification, or, if they have not been signed, the deposit of an instrument of accession, approval or acceptance. In considering Canadian treaty procedures it is necessary to recognize the distinction between the treaty-making power, i.e. the power to enter into treaties and thus incur obligations in international law, and the treaty-implementing power, i.e. the power to enact whatever legislation may be required to bring Canada's domestic law into accord with the international obligations embodied in a treaty, (a) This sub-question is concerned with the treaty-making power. In Canada the constitutional authority to enter into treaties is part of the Royal Prerogative which in practice is exercised by the Governor General in Council. Ratification is therefore an executive act. For this reason no treaties, conventions or other international agreements signed by Canada which are subject to ratification have been ratified by either the Provinces or the Parliament of Canada, (b) This sub-question deals

15298

July 13, 1976

Order Paper Questions

with the treaty-implementing power. Many treaties are in accordance with existing domestic law and therefore do not require further legislative action for their implementation. Other treaties will require legislative action, either federal or provincial, to permit implementation by Canada. The Canada Treaty Register does not contain complete information on legislation which has been adopted by the Parliament of Canada for the purpose of implementing treaties. The Register contains no information on legislation enacted by the Provinces for the purpose of implementing treaties, the subject matter of which falls within provincial jurisdiction. For these reasons it is not possible to indicate the number of treaties which have not been implemented by legislative action of either the Provinces or the Parliament of Canada or have not required specific executive action for their implementation.

2. The compilation of detailed lists of treaties binding on Canada which have not been the subject of specific implementing legislation by either the Provinces or the Parliament of Canada or of specific executive action for their implementation, together with the date of Canada's signature, would necessitate a search of every entry in the Canada Treaty Register and would require an inordinate cost and length of time.

3. Canada has implemented all treaties by which it is bound, whether by signature, ratification or accession. As explained above, legislative action either by the Parliament of Canada or the legislatures of the Provinces is not required where the performance of treaty obligations does not entail alteration of existing domestic law. The number of treaties ratified by Canada which have not required specific legislation by Parliament for their implementation is approximately 296, of which 88 are bilateral agreements and 208 are multilateral agreements. As explained above, no figures can be given for treaties ratified by Canada which have not required implementing legislation by the Provinces because this information is not available from the Canada Treaty Register.

4. No active consideration is being given to this matter.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   TREATIES
Permalink

Question No. 5,410-Mr. Dinsdale: (Corrected) 1. Has the Post Office Department recently introduced a policy of nameless postmarks and, if so, for what reason have the names of cities and towns been replaced by a code? 2. Does the Department have a policy of replacing all names with numbers and, if so, what is the next planned change? 3. Did the Department examine the experience of the USA Postal Service, which introduced similar nameless postmarks, and which more recently restored city and town names in the face of popular demand?


LIB

Paul Edmund McRae (Parliamentary Secretary to the Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. Paul E. McRae (Parliamentary Secretary to Postmaster General):

1. The Post Office recently introduced the use of the postal code in its cancellation mark primarily for certain centres where changes in the pattern of mail processing made the continued use of a community name identifier impractical. This has occurred where mail from a number of communities is now gathered into one major processing plant and collectively processed in one stream. In these new mechanized plants it is impractical to keep segregated the mail from different source locations, and rather than select the name of one community to be used

for the cancellation of all mail processed through such a plant, it was decided to use the postal code of the plant. For example, the processing plant located in Scarborough, Ontario will process mail from surrounding areas such as Richmond Hill, Willowdale, Thornhill, Markham, Ajax, Pickering and others.

2. No, the Post Office does not have a policy of changing all names to numbers. It is not planned to use postal code postmarks at St. John's, Newfoundland as originally stated.

3. Yes, the Post Office Department is familiar with the United States Postal Service experience. However, the systems are different in the two countries and there is no practical relationship.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   NAMELESS POSTMARKS
Permalink
PC

Mr. Forrestall

Progressive Conservative

What is the total value of contracts to private firms for work at the government dockyard in Halifax previously done by employees of the Department of National Defence for each of the past five years?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE-DOCKYARDS, HALIFAX, N.S.
Permalink

July 13, 1976