May 31, 1976

LIB

Robert Phillip Kaplan (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Mr. Bob Kaplan (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Health and Welfare):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to call to the attention of hon. members the presence in our gallery of a distinguished visitor from the Congress of the United States, Congressman Paul Rogers who is chairman of the subcommittee on Health in the Environment and of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF CONGRESSMAN PAUL ROGERS OF THE UNITED STATES
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

95568-50'/2

May 31, 1976

Oral Questions

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF CONGRESSMAN PAUL ROGERS OF THE UNITED STATES
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

PC

James McPhail Gillies

Progressive Conservative

Mr. James Gillies (Don Valley):

Mr. Speaker, I had a question for the Secretary of State for External Affairs but in his absence I shall put it to the Acting Prime Minister. In light of the statement made by the Prime Minister of Pakistan this week-end that Canada and his country were virtually at the stage of signing an agreement on nuclear exports and nuclear activity, and that the delay that has taken place so far has been on Canada's part only, until the resolution of the problem of India; now that that is behind us can the Acting Prime Minister tell the House how close we are to entering into an agreement with Pakistan?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PAKISTAN-POSSIBILITY OF SIGNING AGREEMENT TO SELL NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY-SAFEGUARDS AGAINST BUILDING OF BOMB
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I cannot be sure about the time it will take to conclude negotiations but I can assure the hon. gentleman that we have not had the same problem in dealing with Pakistan that we had with India.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PAKISTAN-POSSIBILITY OF SIGNING AGREEMENT TO SELL NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY-SAFEGUARDS AGAINST BUILDING OF BOMB
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PC

James McPhail Gillies

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gillies:

A supplementary question, Mr. Speaker. Given the fact that the Prime Minister of Pakistan made the statement after the explosion of the Indian nuclear bomb that they were in fact looking for nuclear devices in order to balance the weapons situation between the two countries, what assurance do we have in Canada that we are not going to see a repetition of the Indian situation if we go ahead with negotiations with Pakistan? May we not find at some later date that Pakistan has built a bomb? What assurance are we going to have from the government of Pakistan before an agreement is signed that that is not going to happen?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PAKISTAN-POSSIBILITY OF SIGNING AGREEMENT TO SELL NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY-SAFEGUARDS AGAINST BUILDING OF BOMB
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Sharp:

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. gentleman will recall the agreement we had with India said that the co-operation between Canada and India could not be used in order to enable India to produce a nuclear bomb. We had assumed from that agreement-and it turned out that our assumption was inaccurate-that it would also prohibit a nuclear explosion of any kind. In any negotiations with Pakistan, we will ensure there is no such ambiguity.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PAKISTAN-POSSIBILITY OF SIGNING AGREEMENT TO SELL NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY-SAFEGUARDS AGAINST BUILDING OF BOMB
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PC

James McPhail Gillies

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gillies:

A final supplementary, Mr. Speaker. Can the Acting Prime Minister assure the House that the terms of the safeguards agreement between Pakistan and India will be tabled in this House before that agreement is signed?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PAKISTAN-POSSIBILITY OF SIGNING AGREEMENT TO SELL NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY-SAFEGUARDS AGAINST BUILDING OF BOMB
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Sharp:

Mr. Speaker, I could not give that undertaking. The government takes responsibility for agreements of this kind and for all agreements with sovereign countries. This is a long standing rule that has prevailed in Canada, that the government does take responsibility for such transactions. I can assure my colleague, however, that the Secretary of State for External Affairs would have no objection after the agreement is reached, of tabling it and having whatever discussion is necessary.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PAKISTAN-POSSIBILITY OF SIGNING AGREEMENT TO SELL NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY-SAFEGUARDS AGAINST BUILDING OF BOMB
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REQUEST FOR STATEMENT ON SAFEGUARDS AND SANCTIONS IN EVENT OF NUCLEAR SALE TO PAKISTAN

PC

David Samuel Horne MacDonald

Progressive Conservative

Mr. David MacDonald (Egmont):

Mr. Speaker, I have a supplementary question for the Acting Prime Minister with respect to the present negotiations with Pakistan concerning nuclear assistance. I wonder if he could give an assurance to this House that if it is not possible to table the actual agreement that the Prime Minister or the Secretary of State for External Affairs will make a statement on motions shortly indicating what improved inspection procedures might be in effect with respect to Pakistan? Could he also inform the House whether any sanctions will be imposed in light of the completely unacceptable situation, and apparently unworkable situation, with respect to sanctions applying to India?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR STATEMENT ON SAFEGUARDS AND SANCTIONS IN EVENT OF NUCLEAR SALE TO PAKISTAN
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, as I said in answer to the previous question, in any agreement we have with Pakistan there will be no ambiguity on this point of confirming that nuclear explosions will be prohibited under the agreement.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR STATEMENT ON SAFEGUARDS AND SANCTIONS IN EVENT OF NUCLEAR SALE TO PAKISTAN
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PC

David Samuel Horne MacDonald

Progressive Conservative

Mr. MacDonald (Egmont):

A further supplementary question. I am not sure that the Acting Prime Minister fully understood my question. I am interested to know whether in this case-as was not present in the agreement with India-there will be sanctions that will have some impact? Perhaps either he or the Prime Minister would elaborate on the question I asked the Prime Minister on May 4 with respect to some kind of collective agreement and sanctions resulting from the London Club agreement. I believe the Prime Minister at that time offered to give me that kind of indication or assurance, so that we might know that negotiations with Pakistan would provide real protection.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR STATEMENT ON SAFEGUARDS AND SANCTIONS IN EVENT OF NUCLEAR SALE TO PAKISTAN
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Sharp:

Mr. Speaker, I will take that request under consideration and discuss it with the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for External Affairs. I return to my previous answer to the hon. member's question. In the case of India, the problem was that India claimed that it had not broken the agreement it made with Canada and therefore that it had not in any way merited the kinds of sanctions we found it necessary to employ by way of withholding aid for certain purposes and denying further nuclear co-operation. That arose because India would not agree with our interpretation of the agreement. Therefore, on this occasion, we will try to enter into an agreement with Pakistan, if one emerges, an agreement which avoids the ambiguities which led to the difficulties with India.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR STATEMENT ON SAFEGUARDS AND SANCTIONS IN EVENT OF NUCLEAR SALE TO PAKISTAN
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POSITION OF PAKISTAN ON NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION TREATY

PC

David Samuel Horne MacDonald

Progressive Conservative

Mr. David MacDonald (Egmont):

A supplementary question, Mr. Speaker. As President Bhutto has said that there would be an attempt to achieve nuclear parity with India, I wonder if the Prime Minister can say if the government of Pakistan, as an indication of its own intentions, has made any decision regarding the ratification of a nonproliferation treaty, and would this be in conformity with Canada's own condition concerning any final agreement with Pakistan.

May 31, 1976

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   POSITION OF PAKISTAN ON NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION TREATY
Permalink
LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I am not sure about the ratification process. Certainly, any indication by Pakistan that they intended to go the route of having nuclear weapons would make it impossible to have the kind of co-operation between Canada and Pakistan that they desire.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   POSITION OF PAKISTAN ON NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION TREATY
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FINANCE

NDP

John Edward Broadbent

New Democratic Party

Mr. Edward Broadbent (Oshawa-Whitby):

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance. Considering the finding of the C.D. Howe Research Institute that data used during the past many months for comparing United States and Canadian levels of productivity increases was in serious error, that instead of Canadian productivity increases being half that of U.S. for the period 1969-74 Canadian productivity increases were twice as great as the United States, would the minister confirm that the government itself based a number of its recent major economic decisions on that erroneous data?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   ALLEGED USE OF ERRONEOUS UNITED STATES PRODUCTIVITY FIGURES
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May 31, 1976