April 16, 1975

?

An hon. Member:

Injunctions.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Florian Côté

Liberal

Mr. Cote:

-yes, injunctions and thank you. Injunctions have been claimed, but unfortunately, the injunctions claimed to date have been asked for by bodies which buy grain to resell it to farmers. The farmer has not asked for injunctions. I have asked representatives of the FPA this afternoon, and I hope that the farmers in the Trois-Rivieres area, who own large quantities of grains, will ask themselves for injunctions, several of them. They might not be respected, but at least if the farmer as such, the one who is really involved, would ask for injunctions, there might be some pressure on the government, on the state, on the provincial government, for as far as the Department of Justice is concerned, at the provincial police level, laws are not complied with, and pressure will be put to bear on this jurisdiction. In Ottawa, the federal government will be urged to settle problems, not by incurring a reprimand

April 16, 1975

Feed Grain

or seeking to revolt, for what is being done here tonight is of no help for agriculture.

I will therefore conclude, Mr. Speaker, by asking the hon. member for Joliette to convince the Progressive Conservative members to give their consent for the Canadian Wheat Board, which their predecessors established in 1929, to be more generous, since we are presently experiencing difficulties in getting a bit of Western grains, about ten million bushels, for Eastern Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I think it is rather late in the night, and I feel we should go and get some rest.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Prosper Boulanger

Liberal

Mr. Prosper Boulanger (Mercier):

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Saint-Hyacinthe (Mr. Wagner) has just said-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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SC

Joseph Adrien Henri Lambert

Social Credit

Mr. Lambert (Bellechasse):

On a point of order, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Gérald Laniel (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

The hon. member for Bellechasse on a point of order.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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SC

Joseph Adrien Henri Lambert

Social Credit

Mr. Lambert (Bellechasse):

May I ask the Chair if I could put a question to the hon. member for Richelieu (Mr. Cote) who has just completed his speech, for I would like to ask him a question?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Gérald Laniel (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

I have to remind the hon. member that he should ask the hon. member for Richelieu and not the Chair.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Florian Côté

Liberal

Mr. Cote:

It is agreed, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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SC

Joseph Adrien Henri Lambert

Social Credit

Mr. Lambert (Bellechasse):

Mr. Speaker, I have always been told that I was to address the Chair in order to tell an hon. member something. So, in these circumstances, I would ask the hon. member through you if he agrees that the Canadian Parliament has a very great responsibility with respect to problems which might arise within our society and that it is the duty of members of Parliament, be they on the opposition side or on the government side, to raise those questions and problems when they arise, or under the standing orders of our assembly, in order to focus the attention of the Cabinet on some particular question and that such a way of acting is not unreasonable. Does the hon. member agree with that way of looking at things?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Florian Côté

Liberal

Mr. Cote:

I believe I do, Mr. Speaker, I am ready to accept that with some reservations. We should be careful. Considering the very broad jurisdiction of the Canadian Parliament and its administrative procedures, the acts which were passed and the powers some agencies were interested with, when it comes to believing that one is right in trying to urge government to pass bills faster than the acts which were designed by that very Parliament, then I have reservations. That is why I am saying that as members of Parliament we should try not to prove people that we have been strong, that we loved them; crying on the left shoulder knowing that favors may be obtained from the right one, that is what my reservations are about.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Prosper Boulanger

Liberal

Mr. Boulanger:

Mr. Speaker, the answer just given by my colleague, the hon. member for Richelieu (Mr. Cote) was a small part of my speech. I should not exceed 20

minutes since the mover and his party, the Social Credit of Canada are willing to hear me for about 20 minutes. I will try to interest them and make them understand certain things. I do not know as member for a small town on the island of Montreal, if they wonder why I rise to speak.

First, a few hours ago, I was talking with one of my best friends who is simply a longshoreman, an honest man who has earned his living for 30 years in Montreal harbour and who knows that there has been a debate taking place here since 8 o'clock. The first thing he did was to congratulate the mover, the member for Bellechasse (Mr. Lambert), for this emergency debate, and that proves that he is a serious and sincere man. But he told me, a few hours ago, that we should not forget that the speeches we will hear tonight could bring certain of our members to start a small rebellion that there is a more serious conflict than you would think. Then I asked him the reason? I am speaking as a Montrealer, not as a farmer because I do not know agriculture. I do not know if that will please some of my colleagues in my party because that is the opinion of a worker, a longshoreman but expressed so eloquently by my colleague from Richelieu (Mr. Cote). He is afraid that we are preparing an early measure forcing them to return to work. They have been fearing a little for a few hours already. Is it that fear-

I do not have any details to give because there is a part I can tell, and the other does not concern the House.

I will tell you the part that concerns us. When one talks of a friend, of a worker, if one does not have respect for the friendship of a worker who confides anything to you, that is a proof that one does not have any dignity at all.

So the part I want to tell you about a man I did not and I will not name is that he fears the government, and particularly when he refers to the Minister of Agriculture, that the government should proceed too rapidly to reach a decision within a few hours. I answered: There is no question of a few hours.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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?

An hon. Member:

No.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Prosper Boulanger

Liberal

Mr. Boulanger:

There is a question of allowing you to use all your rights, all your privileges because your strike is legal and to use all that to defend yourselves. But, on the other hand, we, in the government-I was talking about Parliament then-members both in power and in the Opposition also have a duty to fulfill, that of ensuring that the people of this country are well served. At present, there is no mistake about it, you are depriving farmers of part of their income and also run the risk of depriving the consumer. In a few weeks, if that ever lasts a few weeks, there will be a danger of depriving people of food and by the same token a danger of speculation called the black market of prices, etc.

So, we have a duty to fulfill, and a decision must be made. Our friend from Bellechasse, I agree, was serious. On the other hand, I told my hon. friend the expert from the area of Joliette (Mr. La Salle), that is perhaps less serious. When one thinks that he pretended at one time to be a defender of Quebec, of French Canada, and he left the party because he was badly treated in that party, but he has not yet succeeded to convince anybody of his western

April 16, 1975

group to help us bring back order, then justice in the Eastern Canada. You have done nothing of the kind.

Mr. Speaker, it is the first time that I attack him in this House-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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PC

Roch La Salle

Progressive Conservative

Mr. La Salle:

On a point of order, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Prosper Boulanger

Liberal

Mr. Boulanger:

It is the first time that I attack him in this House, but it is not the last one.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Gérald Laniel (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

Order, please. The hon. member for Joliette rises on a point of order.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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PC

Roch La Salle

Progressive Conservative

Mr. La Salle:

I rise on a point of order, Mr. Speaker, because of the words used by the hon. member for Lange-lier-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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?

Some hon. Members:

Mercier!

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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PC

Roch La Salle

Progressive Conservative

Mr. La Salle:

I mean Mercier (Mr. Boulanger).

As the Progressive Conservative Party was not aware of the interests of Quebec, he may have been late during this debate, and as I think he met a longshoreman who took part of his time, I would like to tell him that we never got such co-operation and support as regards the problem of Quebec from members of that party from every province, as many government members have shown, even members of the Social Credit party.

Then, I think that the hon. member for Mercier is late with these news.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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LIB

Prosper Boulanger

Liberal

Mr. Boulanger:

I will invite him to join another party.

I do not know, Mr. Speaker, if it is a valid point of order, but he understood quite well that I was in no way referring to what the Progressive Conservative party has just said tonight; I was referring to its past, he knows quite well what I mean, he understood me pretty well. However, I want to show him tonight that it is not easy for you in the official Opposition, with three good guys from Quebec, to be understood by millionaires of Western Canada. Now, you know everything.

We, Easterners, from Quebec, the Maritimes or elsewhere, who are unable to make ourselves understood by your party and you do not even realize it. You are trying to blame the government, that is the Liberal party that is leading the country. You should at least understand that we have absolute majority, a mandate from the population and that means: We trust you. Lead the country. There is an expression that says: A government must govern. But we have enough diplomacy to choose a typical Minister of Agriculture, an expert in his field. He is not a comedian, he has no desire to make jokes.

The Minister of Agriculture has a responsibility and he intends to assume it and discharge his duty. But you know there are some petty politicians in the opposition, in the Social Credit Party who believe that they can solve all the troubles in the world with a stroke of the pen. That is called clownery. And it is to be heard here only. It is time for one among us to let you know it. It is easy to drift in demagogy. There is nothing easier than to criticize. But did you accomplish miracles when you were in power in Vancouver, British Columbia? You saw what happened there. Anyhow we will not speak about it, because I do not

Feed Grain

wish to deviate from the subject. Moreover, I did not say to the hon. member for Joliette (Mr. La Salle) that I had met the longshoreman, but that I had spoken to him on the phone.

Coming back to what he told me, it is true that I heard my colleagues say to the Minister: You will immediately take some action, you will see to it right now. Granted, I speak as a Montreal member who meets the labourers and the blue collars all day long and all week-ends long, to express myself correctly. I agree that important measures have to be taken, but mind you: we should not ask our longshoremen what we did not dare ask those out West; we should not be too strict either. Let us not forget that out West, before they decided to take emergency measures, they sought our advice; they even criticised us and almost compelled us to let things go for nearly seven weeks. I am not asking you to waste seven weeks, because the matter is really an emergency, but I ask the Minister of Agriculture, and even my colleagues are asking you to decide, knowing your sound judgment, your sense of responsibility, I ask you when the time comes to prepare a draft, either for the return to work or to request a stoppage, once again I ask you to consult with the Minister of Labour and see whether it would be possible to settle the problem within 24 hours. Because we can cause a lot of damage to these blue-collar workers, the Montreal longshoremen. I sympathize with the farmers and I understand them very well, although I merely eat the food that they are producing for us; it will certainly require greater efforts to produce it, and I am sure that the farmer is earnestly and honorably earning his income. There must be justice, so that they can be paid like everybody. I agree that they have low incomes. Yet, we must stop complaining that all farmers are starving, living in distress, and without a cent in their pockets. This is exaggeration again. Personally, I was born in a small village called St. Eugene de l'lslet; my parents had a farm, and although I cannot say that I grew in the field, it was certainly not far from it: this was meant as a pun. When I inherited my father's farm, I was so scared that I gave it away to my eldest brother and said: do whatever you want with it. I was scared. Well, if I was scared at that tender age, you realize how unhappy my brother was with it during the 30 years he kept it. It is true that it is not that profitable. However, we still have a decision to make, which means nearly what you had in mind to do shortly-I will not tell you what it was-and I know that you are going to do it, I know that you have understood your Liberal colleagues. I hope that a decision will be made shortly and that it will benefit both parties, that justice will come for everybody and that the Opposition will have lamented in vain.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 LABOUR CONDITIONS LONGSHOREMEN'S STRIKE-EFFECT ON FEED GRAIN SUPPLIES
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April 16, 1975