June 12, 1972

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

NATIONAL HOUSING ACT

LIB

Stanley Ronald Basford (Minister of State for Urban Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Ron Basford (Minister oi State for Urban Affairs) moved

for leave to introduce Bill C-213, to amend the National Housing Act.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Sub-subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING CO-OPERATIVE HOUSING, LOANS TO NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, FINANCING OF CORPORATION, NEIGHBOURHOOD IMPROVEMENT, ETC.
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Motion agreed to, bill read the first time and ordered to be printed.


QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


OLD AGE SECURITY AND GUARANTEED INCOME SUPPLEMENT

LIB

Mr. Stewart (Okanagan-Kootenay)

Liberal

1. How many persons receive (a) Old Age Security (b) Guaranteed Income Supplement?

2. What was the net cost of (a) the basic Old Age Security (b) the Guaranteed Income Supplement for the fiscal year 1970-71?

3. What percentage of the federal budget do these expenditures represent?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   OLD AGE SECURITY AND GUARANTEED INCOME SUPPLEMENT
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LIB

John Carr Munro (Minister of Amateur Sport; Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Hon. lohn C. Munro (Minister of National Health and Welfare):

1. (a) As of January, 1972, 1,759,036; (b) as of January, 1972, 976,225.

2. (a) $1,627,219,132; (b) $280,005,371. However, increases in benefits under the Guaranteed Income Supplement effective April 1, 1971, brought expenditures close to $525 million for the fiscal year 1971-72.

3. Expenditures on Old Age Security pensions and the Guaranteed Income Supplement are not themselves included in federal budget expenditures, because these payments are made from a separate fund designated for this purpose, namely the Old Age Security Fund. However, in 1970-71, expenditures on Old Age Security pension benefits and the Guaranteed Income Supplement were 12.71 per cent of total federal budgetary and nonbudgetary expenditures, on a national accounts basis. These expenditures for 1972-73 are estimated at $2,555

million which represent 13.45 per cent of estimated federal budgetary and non-budgetary expenditures for that year.

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   OLD AGE SECURITY AND GUARANTEED INCOME SUPPLEMENT
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FAMILY INCOMES

NDP

Mr. Mather

New Democratic Party

1. Does the government have information on the estimated income which will provide a modest but adequate Canadian standard of living for a family of four and, if so, what is the estimate?

2. What percentage of Canadian families make less than $5,000 a year?

3. What percentage of Canadian families make less than $10,000 per year?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   FAMILY INCOMES
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. J. A. Jerome (Parliamentary Secretary to President of the Privy Council):

I am informed by the Departments of National Health and Welfare and Statistics Canada as follows: 1. There is no existing official statistical concept of poverty in Canada. However, Statistics Canada has established low-income cut-offs which have been used to delineate low-income families from other units. For a family of four, in 1969, the income cut-off was set at $4,420. In its report, the Special Senate Committee on Poverty has recommended that basic allowance rates b>

set initially at $3,500 for a family of four. Among provincially established social assistance programs in January 1972, the annual rate of benefits for a family of four ranged from $2,604 in Nova Scotia to $3,252 in Ontario. Also, under the proposed Family Income Security Plan, a family of four, depending on whether there are two or three children, will receive full benefits where family income is less than $5,000 or $5,500 respectively.

2 and 3. The most recent figures available on incomes are for the year 1969. The following income figures include income from investments and government transfer payments as well as income from employment. 24.8 per cent of families had incomes below $5,000 per year; 66.6 per cent of families had incomes below $10,000 per year.

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   FAMILY INCOMES
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FAMILY INCOME SECURITY PLAN

LIB

Mr. Robinson

Liberal

What is the estimated amount of money that will be paid to recipients under the new family allowance program, does this exceed the amount paid out under the old plan and, if so, by how much?

Hon. ]ohn Munro (Minister of National Health and Welfare): The proposed Family Income Security Plan will replace not only the family allowances program, but also the current youth allowances progam. The estimated cost of the Family Income Security Plan in the first year of operation and the amount now expended on current programs, including Quebec schooling allowances, are $820

June 12, 1972

Questions

million and $650 million respectively, so that the additional costs of the new proposals are estimated at $170 million.

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   FAMILY INCOME SECURITY PLAN
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CMHC TASK FORCE ON LOW INCOME HOUSING

PC

Mr. McCleave

Progressive Conservative

Did CMHC commission a task force under Michael Dennis and, if so (a) for what purposes (b) how many reports were requested by the task force and from whom (c) what will be the total cost of this task force?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   CMHC TASK FORCE ON LOW INCOME HOUSING
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LIB

Stanley Ronald Basford (Minister of State for Urban Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Ron Basford (Minister of State ior Urban Affairs):

In January, 1971, a study of low income housing was commissioned by CMHC, to be carried out by a task force, headed by Mr. Michael Dennis, (a) The main purposes of the study were to examine present approaches to low income housing, and the extent to which current program meet stated objectives, and also to consider what the future role of CMHC in the low income housing field might be. The study was to provide, over the long run, a range of policy alternatives supported by research.

(b) The following ten studies were commissioned by the Low Income Housing Task Force: (i) Melvin Charney: study of the adequacy and production of low income housing, (ii) G. Fortin: study of social and institutional aspects of the provision of low income housing in Quebec, (iii) Professor George Molins-Ysal: study of the residential housing construction industry, (iv) Dr. Aprodicio Laqui-an: study on internal migration and low income housing, (v) Michael Clague: study of citizen group development in Vancouver and its implications for low income housing policy, (vi) Professors Deutsch and Green: study of the public finance aspects of low income housing, (vii) Professor Helen Abel: preparation of policy recommendations in the area of rural housing, (viii) M. Fernand Hwon, CRUR-INRS: study of the housing projects under CMHC directive administration in Montreal, (ix) Mr. George Hunter: study of housing policies and programs of the federal departments and agencies other than CMHC. (x) Planning Secretariat of Manitoba: study of low income housing in Manitoba undertaken in conjunction with the Task Force on Low Income Housing.

(c) The cost of the task force as at February 29, 1972, was $322,857.05.

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   CMHC TASK FORCE ON LOW INCOME HOUSING
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PENSION OF RIGHT HON. LESTER B. PEARSON

SC

Mr. Godin

Social Credit

Does the former Prime Minister of Canada, the Right Hon. Lester B. Pearson, receive a pension from the government and, if so, is it subject to income tax?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   PENSION OF RIGHT HON. LESTER B. PEARSON
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LIB

James Alexander Jerome (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. J. A. Jerome (Parliamentary Secretary to President of the Privy Council):

I am informed by the Privy Council office and the Department of Supply and Services as follows: The Right Hon. L. B. Pearson receives a pension as a former prime minister under the terms of the Members of Parliament Retiring Allowances Act and also receives an annuity under the Civil Service Superannuation Act. These pensions are subject to income tax. Parliamentary pensions payable to former Members of Parliament are under the administrative jurisdiction of the Speaker of the House of Commons.

(Mr. Munro.J

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   PENSION OF RIGHT HON. LESTER B. PEARSON
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June 12, 1972