June 5, 1972

?

An hon. Member:

You must take inflation into account.

Topic:   PENITENTIARIES-SUSPENSION OF REGULATION MAKING INMATES FINANCIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR WILFUL DAMAGE TO POPERTY
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LIB

Douglas Aird Hogarth (Parliamentary Secretary to the Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. Hogarth:

May I point out, to correct the hon. member further, that there is no intention on the part of the Solicitor General to relieve any individual inmate from responsibility for civil damages or property destroyed or damaged in our penitentiaries. What has been decided is that the collection of such damages will no longer be pursued merely on the basis of an administrative directive from the commissioner. Henceforth, in appropriate cases collection of such damages will be pursued by a regulation appropriately passed under the provisions of the Penetentiaries Act or, in the alternative, by civil process in the courts of ordinary civil jurisdiction.

Topic:   PENITENTIARIES-SUSPENSION OF REGULATION MAKING INMATES FINANCIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR WILFUL DAMAGE TO POPERTY
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MANPOWER-LOCAL INITIATIVES PROGRAM-RESPONSE TO REQUESTS FOR ADDITIONAL FUNDS AND EXTENSION OF TIME FOR COMPLETION OF PROJECT

PC

Jack Marshall

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jack Marshall (Humber-St. George's-St. Barbe):

Mr. Speaker, today I asked the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Manpower and Immigration (Mr. Perrault) if any consideration would be given by the government to

June 5, 1972

Proceedings on Adjournment Motion providing more funds to municipalities or groups to complete projects which were approved under the Local Initiatives Program and, through underestimating the project, cannot complete same due to lack of funds.

For some reason or other the congenial parliamentary secretary continued to avoid the import of the question and instead, for the benefit of his party, said what glad tidings he had for us about what the government is doing. Tonight I am going to surprise him and say that I think the Local Initiatives Program is good. I give full marks to the government for introducing it, but unfortunately they made a few errors, which anyone can make, and I am going to try to help the parliamentary secretary and the minister overcome these weaknesses.

My question was prompted by several representations made to me because projects which were approved could not be completed due to the fact that costs were underestimated. This is going to leave a good number of projects incomplete and, therefore, the value of such projects and their benefits will be lost. Indeed, the money so far allocated will be wasted. In this regard, I feel it imperative that a good, hard look be given immediately to all projects in order to assess and ensure successful completion.

While I have the opportunity, I think it is worth while to put forth some ideas to the government in line with the Local Initiatives Program. In my opinion, the federal government should broaden the concept of the Local Initiatives Program into a five-year national development plan to strengthen provincial and municipal infrastructures. Every community in Canada requires basic public services such as water and sewage, access roads, fishing facilities, standard housing conditions, medical services, day-care centres and the like. The government should give consideration to providing a program, through the coordination of all departments concerned, to work in cooperation with all levels of government to provide the funds through local initiative to achieve these goals.

If consideration were given to such a proposal, the departments of government concerned could allocate funds from their votes in ensuing years to support local initiative. Not only would public services be provided but it would instil a sense of local participation, pride in one's community and a sense of comradeship and community spirit to make a better Canada.

The Minister of Manpower and Immigration (Mr. Mack-asey) accepted a suggestion that I made in the House a couple of weeks ago that Fisheries and Public Works collaborate with his department to develop a type of project similar to the Local Initiatives Program to allow fishermen to provide new inshore facilities. The minister, whom I admire for his non-partisanship, accepted the idea. I hope something will be forthcoming in this area.

This idea could be broadened to take into account all phases of community infrastructure services with the involvement of local people. This would create a sense of involvement which would contribute toward the objectives of a better Canadian nation. One of the most important problems in our nation today is that of controlling pollution. The government is prepared to spend billions of dollars in this area but it seems to fail to realize that basic

control should be directed at the root of the problems in the area of proper sanitation control in communities.

I have another example. Submissions were advanced by the score in connection with the provision of fishing facilities. They were turned down on the grounds that extended facilities were not justified. Yet similar projects have been approved under the terms of the Local Initiatives Program. This emphasizes the confusion which surrounds the disbursement of government funds and the duplication of effort which occurs. Far better results could be achieved through a combination of effort on the part of all levels of government.

In this connection, I ask the parliamentary secretary to suggest to the minister that when the cabinet next meets it should consider the proposal that the subject of local initiatives programs be placed on the agenda of the federal-provincial-municipal conference to take place this fall. If he needs any help from the opposition, I am ready and willing to assist him in any way possible.

Topic:   MANPOWER-LOCAL INITIATIVES PROGRAM-RESPONSE TO REQUESTS FOR ADDITIONAL FUNDS AND EXTENSION OF TIME FOR COMPLETION OF PROJECT
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LIB

Raymond J. Perrault (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Manpower and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Hay Perrault (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Manpower and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the minister I wish to thank the hon. member for setting forth certain of his ideas with respect to the Local Initiatives Program. As he knows, the government is very responsive to good ideas from whatever direction. As well, I welcome the enthusiastic support accorded to the Local Initiatives Program by the hon. member speaking for the official opposition. This is especially heartening in view of the earlier criticism voiced by one or two of his colleagues on the basis of incorrect information.

As of June 5 the department has granted an extension of time in respect of 1,396 projects to allow them to be completed to the extent of the funds which have been allocated to them. These extensions have been allowed to June 16 and are in line with the minister's announcement made on May 1. Furthermore, the minister stated on June 2 that an additional $30 million allocated to the Local Initiatives Program would permit some 1,200 projects to be extended to September 30, keeping some 15,000 persons at work until the end of the summer. I know the hon. member will greet this news with real enthusiasm.

The minister has indicated already that the criteria for selecting the extended projects will, in general, favour the quality of life over job creativity. In this regard, I understand there have been 11 extensions involving an amount of almost $300,000 in the great province of Newfoundland alone. The manpower and immigration department has issued a first list of the projects extended during the summer; it contains some 730 names. That was on June 2, and the number will be greater by now. It is expected that all the 1,200 contract extensions will have been signed within a few days.

The original $150 million program created 92,500 jobs during the winter, far in excess of the number predicted by certain members of the opposition. One hundred million dollars was allocated to projects promoted by private organizations and $50 million to projects sponsored by municipal councils. Most of the extended projects are private ones.

Motion agreed to and the House adjourned at 10.20 p.m.

June 5, 1972

Topic:   MANPOWER-LOCAL INITIATIVES PROGRAM-RESPONSE TO REQUESTS FOR ADDITIONAL FUNDS AND EXTENSION OF TIME FOR COMPLETION OF PROJECT
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APPENDIX


May 31, 1972


NORTH ATLANTIC COUNCIL, BONN, MAY 30-31, 1972 FINAL COMMUNIQUE


The North Atlantic Council met in Ministerial Session in Bonn on 30th and 31st May 1972, 2. Ministers reaffirmed that the purpose of the Alliance is to preserve the freedom and security of all its members. Defence and the relaxation of tension are inseparably linked. The solidarity of the Alliance is indispensable in this respect. Allied Governments seek an improvement in their relations with the countries of Eastern Europe and aim at a just and durable peace which would overcome the division of Germany and foster security in Europe. 3. Ministers noted progress in relations between Western and Eastern countries, increasing contacts between the leaders of these countries, and the conclusion of important agreements and arrangements. They welcomed these developments flowing from major initiatives undertaken by their governments, which had full and timely consultations on these subjects. Such consultations will continue. 4. ' Ministers welcomed the signing by the United States and the USSR of the Treaty on the Limitation of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems and the interim agreement on Certain Measures with respect to the Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms. They believe these two agreements limiting the strategic arms of the United States and the USSR will contribute to strategic stability, significantly strengthen international confidence and reduce the danger of nuclear war. Ministers also welcomed the commitment by the United States and the USSR actively to continue negotiations on limiting strategic arms. They expressed the hope that these two agreements will be the beginning of a new and promising era of negotiations in the arms control field. 5. Ministers noted with satisfaction that the Treaty of August 12, 1970, between the Federal Republic of Germany and the USSR and the Treaty of December 7, 1970, between the Federal Republic of Germany and the Polish People's Republic are to enter into force in the near future. They reaffirmed their opinion that these treaties are important, both as contributions towards the relaxation of tension in Europe and as elements of the modus vivendi which the Federal Republic of Germany wishes to establish with its Eastern neighbours. Ministers welcomed the declaration of May 17 in which the Federal Republic of Germany confirmed its policy to this end and reaffirmed its loyalty to the Atlantic Alliance as the basis of its security and freedom. They noted that it remains the policy of the Federal Republic of Germany to work for circumstances of peace in Europe in which the Germany people, in free self-determination, can recover their unity; and that the existing treaties and agreements to which the Federal Republic of Germany is a party and the rights and responsibilities of the four powers relating to Berlin and Germany as a whole remain unaffected. 6. Ministers also welcomed the progress made since their last meeting in the talks between the Federal Republic of Germany and the GDR. They regard the conclusion of the agreements and arrangements between the competent German authorities, which supplement the Quadripartite Agreement on Berlin on September 3, 1971, as well as the signature of a Treaty on Questions of Traffic between the Federal Republic of Germany and the GDR, as important steps in the effort to improve the situation in Germany. They thus feel encouraged in the hope that, in further negotiations between the Federal Republic of Germany and the GDR, agreement might be reached on more comprehensive arrangements which would take into account the special situation in Germany. 7. Ministers noted with satisfaction that the Governments of France, the United Kingdom, the United States and the USSR have arranged to sign the Final Protocol to the Quadripartite Agreement. The entry into force of the entire Berlin Agreement being thus assured, the Ministers hope that a new era can begin for Berlin, free of the tension that has marked its history for the past quarter century. 8. In the light of these favourable developments, Ministers agreed to enter into multilateral conversations concerned with preparations for a Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. They accepted with gratitude the proposal of the Finnish Government to act as host for such talks in Helsinki at the level of Heads of Mission under the conditions set out in its aide-memoire of November 24, 1970. Accordingly, they decided to work out with other interested governments the necessary arrangements for beginning the multilateral preparatory talks. 9. Ministers stated that the aim of allied governments at the multilateral preparatory talks would be to ensure that their proposals were fully considered at a conference and to establish that enough common ground existed among the participants to warrant reasonable expectations that a conference would produce satisfactory results. 10. Prepared in this way, a Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe should constitute an important factor in the process of reducing tension. It should help to eliminate obstacles to closer relations and co-operation among the participants while maintaining the security of all. Allied governments look forward to a serious examination of the real problems at issue and to a conference which would yield practical results. 11. Ministers considered that in the interests of security the examination at a CSCE of appropriate measures including certain military measures aimed at strengthening confidence and increasing stability would contribute to the process of reducing the dangers of military confrontation.



June 5, 1972 12. Ministers noted the Report of the Council in Permanent Session concerning a Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. The Report examined the issues which might be included on the Agenda of a Conference as set forth in paragraph 13 of the Brussels Communique of December 10, 1971, as well as the procedural questions relating to the convening of a Conference. Ministers directed the Council in Parmanent Session to develop further its substantive and procedural studies in preparation for a Conference. 13. Ministers representing countries which participate in NATO's Integrated Defence Programme recalled the offers to discuss mutual and balanced force reductions which they had made at Reykjavik in 1968, at Rome in 1970 and subsequently reaffirmed. 14. These Ministers continue to aim at negotiations on mutual and balanced force reductions and related measures. They believe that these negotiations should be conducted on a multilateral basis and be preceded by suitable explorations. They regretted that Soviet Government has failed to respond to the Allied offer of October, 1971 to enter into exploratory talks. They, therefore, now propose that multilateral explorations on mutual and balanced force reductions be undertaken as soon as practicable either before or in parallel with multilateral preparatory talks on a Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. 15. These Ministers noted the studies conducted since their last meeting on political, military and technical aspects of mutual and balanced force reductions. They instructed the Permanent Representatives to continue this work in preparation for eventual negotiations. 16. These Ministers stated that the present military balance of forces in Europe does not allow a unilateral relaxation of the defence efforts of the allies. Unilateral force reductions would detract from the Alliance's efforts to achieve greater stability and detente and would jeopardize the prospects for mutual and balanced force reductions. 17. Ministers took note of a report by the Council in Parmanent Session on the situation in the Mediterranean. They expressed their concern regarding the factors of instability in the area which could endanger the security of the members of the Alliance. They instructed the Council in Permanent Session to follow closely the evolution of the situation and to report to them at their next meeting. 18. The next Ministerial Session of NAC will be held in Brussels in December 1972. 19. Ministers requested the Foreign Minister of Luxembourg to transmit this communique on their behalf through diplomatic channels to all other interested parties, including neutral and non-aligned governments.



Tuesday. June 6. 1972


June 5, 1972