June 5, 1972

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to make two statements today, a very short statement that I have been asked to give on the events at the Tel Aviv airport and also a statement on the meetings of the NATO Council in Bonn. I have discussed this with the opposition parties who are agreeable that I give the two statements together and comments can be made on both at the same time.

I am sure all members of the House shared my feelings of shock and horror when they heard the news of the shooting incident at Tel Aviv airport on May 30. Such acts of senseless violence directed against innocent civilians can only be deplored by reasonable people everywhere. In my absence from Canada, Senator Martin on May 31 conveyed to the Israeli Ambassador in Ottawa the government's feelings and expressions of sympathy to the bereaved families of the victims of this horrible crime. I know the House would wish to join me in expressing sincere condolences to the family of Mrs. Subach of Montreal, who was killed, and to her daughter, Miss Mimi Subach, who was wounded, our wishes for an early recovery.

The ambassadors of Israel and Lebanon have made known to us the views of their governments on this episode. We have taken note of a number of public statements, among them one by the president of Lebanon last Friday condemning the Tel Aviv airport incident. In addition, our ambassador in Beirut has been instructed to convey our views on the incident to the Lebanese government.

This tragic episode is another instance of acts of violence by extremist groups which are unfortunately becoming all too common in various parts of the world. Such acts are particularly dangerous in the Middle East, and I hope that this one will not lead to an escalation of violence there.

Since the incident, new security measures have been put into effect in Canada. My colleague, the Minister of Transport (Mr. Jamieson), would be glad to give information to the House on these measures.

Mr. Speaker, I would now like to give a report on the NATO Foreign Ministers meeting, from which I have just returned, in the capital of the Federal Republic of Germany, situated at the crossroads of Europe. In terms of time, too, the Bonn meeting took place at a crossroads in the evolution of East-West relations.

The NATO meeting coincided with the completion of President Nixon's talks with Soviet leaders. Secretary of State Rogers reported to his colleagues in Bonn on this historic visit and, in particular, on the strategic arms limitation agreements. We all welcomed these agreements as an important turning point in efforts to curb the nuclear arms race and enhance international security through nuclear arms control. Along with other ministers, I welcomed the commitment of the United States and the Soviet Union actively to continue negotiations on further limitations. I also expressed particular appreciation to the United States for having regularly consulted its allies in the North Atlantic council throughout the negotiating process.

On June 3, shortly after the NATO meeting, the Foreign Ministers of the four powers signed a final protocol bringing the Berlin Agreement into force. At the same time, representatives of the Federal Republic of Germany, the Soviet Union and Poland exchanged instruments of ratification concluding their non-aggression treaties. The Canadian government welcomes these agreements as major steps forward in relations between East and West. The Berlin Agreement hopefully marks the end of the recurring tension and instability in and around Berlin that have frequently envenomed East-West relations since the blockade in 1948. The non-aggression treaties should remove another source of tension, allowing the Federal German Republic to put its relations with Eastern Europe on a more normal basis.

Together these developments open the way for the Alliance to take part in multilateral preparatory talks on a conference on security and co-operation in Europe and for the two German states to begin negotiations on a modus vivendi. Such an accommodation is necessary for the success of the Berlin agreement and for the maintenance of stability in Central Europe. If the two German states can agree on a modus vivendi, it will pave the way for their entry into the United Nations and a general recognition of the German Democratic Republic.

When one looks back at the many years of stagnant East-West relations, the conclusion of the Berlin agreement and the non-aggression treaties represents remarkable progress. It vindicates the Alliance's policy of making a Berlin settlement the pre-condition for progress on preparation for a conference and demonstrates that the Alliance, through its solid support for Chancellor Brandt's "ostpolitik", is a positive instrument for detente.

NATO Ministers agreed in Bonn to accept the invitation of the Finnish government to hold multilateral preparato-

June 5, 1972

Tel Aviv Airport Massacre

ry talks in Helsinki to prepare for a conference on security and co-operation. The exact date on which the European countries, the United States and Canada will sit down to talk about a conference will have to be set by mutual agreement among the potential participants. With other NATO members, Canada will now move to engage other interested countries in planning for this phase.

I should emphasize that a decision to convoke a formal conference has not yet been taken. That decision will depend on the outcome of the preparatory talks. The aim of NATO countries at these talks will be to ensure that our proposals are fully considered and to establish that enough common ground exists among participants to warrant reasonable expectations that a conference will produce satisfactory results.

For example, we want to see more normal contacts and exchanges between countries of different political and social systems in Europe. To achieve this end, the conference should deal in a practical way with measures designed to contribute to the freer movement of people, information and ideas. I was not alone in underlining the importance of this consideration at our meeting last week.

On the military side, NATO Ministers were agreed that certain stabilization measures could usefully be discussed at a conference in order to create confidence on both sides.

In addition to a conference on security and co-operation in Europe, NATO Ministers devoted considerable attention to the question of mutual and balanced force reductions. Just as we have always considered that progress in East-West political detente must be measured in terms of practical results, especially on the Berlin problem, so we believe that any real improvement in security in Europe will remain illusory unless it is accompanied by some reduction in the concentration of military power in the area.

This is not to say that force reductions should be negotiated at a conference. It would be impossible in practical terms to carry out negotiations on such a complex matter among the 35 participants in a conference. Preparations for a conference and for mutual and balanced force reduction negotiations should, however, proceed as far as possible in parallel. In order that force reductions complement the political achievements of a security conference, talks on the two subjects should be concurrent but separate.

Unfortunately the explorations on mutual and balanced force reductions have not yet begun because of soviet unwillingness to receive Manlio Brosio, former Secretary General of NATO, as an explorer. More recently, however, the Soviet Union has expressed its willingness to explore procedures for negotiations on mutual and balanced force reductions. At the Bonn meeting NATO Ministers affirmed their support for multilateral explorations. The next step will be to find means of translating this idea into action. I suggested in Bonn that a group should be selected among NATO members to engage the Soviet Union and other interested countries in preliminary talks to seek sufficient agreement to bring about negotiations. Considerable interest was shown in the Canadian idea at the meeting and we hope Alliance mem-

bers can reach accord on some form of group approach in the near future.

The atmosphere in Bonn was very much influenced by the promising progress recently made in the broad negotiating process by which we hope to resolve the underlying causes of tension, including the division of Germany. NATO countries responded by expressing their intention to pursue the opportunities for progress on both preparations for a conference and explorations for mutual and balanced force reductions. We should have no illusions about the difficulties that lie ahead. In many ways the task which now faces us is the most difficult of all. We shall have to combine continued defence preparedness with pursuit of detente, Alliance solidarity with willingness to seek accommodation with the other side, and firmness on basic principles with flexibility on means.

Canada has direct and identifiable interests in both security and co-operation in Europe. That is why we have supported Alliance policies in defence and detente in the past and why we intend to work with our NATO allies in the continued search for improved East-West relations through mutual and balanced force reductions and a conference on security and co-operation in Europe.

I should now like to table the communique issued after the meeting of the North Atlantic Alliance, and suggest, if the House agrees, that it be printed as an appendix to Hansard.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENTS ON MASSACRE AT TEL AVIV AIRPORT AND MEETING OF NATO FOREIGN MINISTERS
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Is it agreed?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENTS ON MASSACRE AT TEL AVIV AIRPORT AND MEETING OF NATO FOREIGN MINISTERS
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

[Editor's note: For communique referred to above, see appendix].

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENTS ON MASSACRE AT TEL AVIV AIRPORT AND MEETING OF NATO FOREIGN MINISTERS
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?

Mr. R. Gordon L. Fairweather@Fundy-Royal

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the minister speaks for all of us when he underlines the horror we felt on learning of the senseless violence at the Tel Aviv airport. We share in his expression of sympathy to the family of Mrs. Subach. Surely it is not too much to ask in 1972 that innocent people be free to travel the world. Surely it is also obvious that violent acts of this sort only make the problems in the Middle East more difficult of solution.

I thank the minister for making available a copy of his statement on the meetings of the NATO council that he attended. He spoke about being at the geographic crossroads of Europe and at a crossroads in the evolution of East-West relations. I am sure we would agree that this is an important juncture. Indeed, President Nixon's visit to Moscow must have been underlined by the NATO council meeting, the SALT talks and so on. I am sure we are interested in the development of plans lor a European security conference, although I suppose it is not too unfair to say that no one can accuse NATO or the Warsaw pact countries of moving with undue haste, since this has been very much an international topic for some years now.

The minister also mentioned the success that President Nixon had in achieving an agreement to curb the nuclear arms race. Here I was struck by the irony of the fact that France will later this year be testing nuclear devices in the Pacific area. Presumably France is now attending and participating in the meetings being held by the United

June 5, 1972

Nations at Stockholm, but I suppose it is also true to say that irony is not an unknown concept in international issues.

I am sure it is important for the European community and for NATO to be at the stage now where they are co-ordinating their international policies. We must remember that NATO is not the same thing as the European community. The communique the minister has tabled concerning the ministerial sessions of NATO contains the words "freedom and security" and refers to the need to preserve freedom and security on the part of all members of NATO. I hope that as we preserve these concepts internationally member nations, such as the military regime of Greece, will live up domestically to the ideals that undoubtedly she espouses if she is a signatory to this communique internationally.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENTS ON MASSACRE AT TEL AVIV AIRPORT AND MEETING OF NATO FOREIGN MINISTERS
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NDP

Francis Andrew Brewin

New Democratic Party

Mr. Andrew Brewin (Greenwood):

Mr. Speaker, I join, as do all members of my party, in the feelings of shock and horror expressed by the minister at the senseless massacre at the Tel Aviv airport. We also join him in the messages of sympathy to the families of the victims. There are two features of this appalling outrage I want to note. First, it was fully premeditated and fully planned and, second, it was aimed at entirely innocent civilians. It marks a new high in barbarism. One of the most regrettable features is that certain spokesmen for some governments in the Middle East condone this act of terrorism. All the more credit to King Hussein of Jordan who described it as a product of sick minds. There is no doubt of the revulsion of the whole civilized world at such acts of violence. Surely it is up to governments to co-operate more effectively in limiting and preventing the preparation of these deeds of terrorism within their own territories.

The general statement of the minister on the NATO ministerial meeting was most welcome to us and I think to men and women of good will throughout the world. Although much remains to be done to end confrontation in Central Europe, most striking and encouraging progress has been made.

The Moscow communique, setting out the results of the meeting between President Nixon and leaders of the U.S.S.R. indicates that the two superpowers have set their faces toward a more co-operative relationship. The SALT talks resulting in the signing of a treaty on the limitation of ABM systems and the further agreement on the limitation of strategic offensive arms mark a slackening of what has been called the mad momentum of the nuclear arms race.

The Berlin agreement removes a source of tension in Central Europe. Non-aggression treaties between the Federal Republic of Germany, the U.S.S.R. and Poland have opened the way to a reduction of fear and suspicion in that part of the world, and also opened the way to the proposed European security conference. I suggest we should now be ready to welcome both Germanys into the United Nations.

I pay tribute to Chancellor Brandt. In my view his statesmanlike initiatives have had a lot to do with the far better climate of affairs in Europe at the present time.

Tel Aviv Airport Massacre

We acknowledge that preparatory talks are necessary before the European security conference proceeds, but we hope that the NATO countries do not drag their feet on the ground of need for preparation. We think that the momentum of recent events should be followed by action.

The subject of mutual and balanced force reductions is a complex subject, but this is absolutely essential if there is to be reality in the reduction of tension in that part of the world. I have never been quite sure that Mr. Brosio, the former Secretary General of NATO, was the right person to send to deal with mutual and balanced force reductions. However that may be, I am glad to see this communique indicates that multilateral discussions will take place.

I would end by saying that the test of all these useful developments will be the momentum with which the nations use the favourable atmosphere and for positive and definite moves toward a more co-operative world community.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENTS ON MASSACRE AT TEL AVIV AIRPORT AND MEETING OF NATO FOREIGN MINISTERS
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SC

David Réal Caouette

Social Credit

Mr. Real Caouette (Temiscamingue):

Mr. Speaker, my colleagues and I share the regrets and concern expressed by the hon. Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Sharp) in regard to the recent massacre at the Tel Aviv airport which was no doubt organized and planned by criminal lunatics. We deplore such acts, whether they occur in Tel Aviv or elsewhere. We regret this escalation of reprovable acts by notorious criminals seeking to create panic wherever they go.

Such acts have been committed in Tel Aviv, and even here in Canada. Some are occurring now in Latin America, in Mexico and other countries.

We therefore join the representative of the government in expressing our most sincere condolences to the bereaved families.

Concerning the other subject dealt with by the hon. Secretary of State for External Affairs, the NATO meeting, I should say that negotiations between the Soviet authorities and the President of the United States have resulted in agreements on arms limitation, on the use and testing of nuclear arms. We suggest that it is not through arms that peace can be achieved in the world, but rather through understanding, charity and co-operation whether between Russia and the United States or any country, including Canada. I repeat, Mr. Speaker, that in my opinion it is through dialogue and understanding that a just and durable peace can be established in the world.

Now, even though people or representatives of government may say efforts are being made to achieve peace, we must recognize that the more peace is discussed the greater disagreement and bickering because between the various countries of the world. And it is certainly not through arms or criminal acts such as we have been witnessing recently that a just and durable peace can be established.

My colleagues and I are happy with the talks the President of the United States has held and we hope they will have favourable consequences, which might renew the hopes of the population as to the establishment of a just and durable peace throughout the world.

June 5, 1972

Transport

[English] Mr. Speaker: There is not unanimity. The motion cannot

TRANSPORT be put.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENTS ON MASSACRE AT TEL AVIV AIRPORT AND MEETING OF NATO FOREIGN MINISTERS
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PC

William Marvin Howe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. W. M. Howe (Wellington-Grey-Duiierin-Waterloo):

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 43 I ask the unanimous consent of the House to propose a motion in the following case of urgent and pressing necessity. Last week the Standing Committee on Transport and Communications held hearings in western Ontario to ascertain whether alternate, efficient comfortable bus service had been provided as promised at the Canadian Transport Commission hearings in Owen Sound in March, 1970. In view of the fact that these services are far from being as promised, bringing untold hardship to thousands of citizens both young and old, with consent I intend to move, seconded by the hon. member for Huron (Mr. McKinley):

That the government immediately issue instructions to the Canadian National Railways and Canadian Pacific Railway to re-establish the passenger rail services which were discontinued in November, 1970, in western Ontario.

Federal authorities in conjunction with the province of Ontario and the municipalities involved immediately undertake studies which would involve public hearings with a view to determining a minimum railway passenger train network as defined in relationship to the most economic, efficient and adequate transportation system required.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   WESTERN ONTARIO RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE-REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   WESTERN ONTARIO RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE-REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   WESTERN ONTARIO RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE-REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   WESTERN ONTARIO RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE-REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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FISHERIES

ATLANTIC SALMON-OPERATIONS BY DENMARK- REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43

PC

Jack Marshall

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jack Marshall (Humber-St. George's-St. Barbe):

Mr. Speaker, I too seek unanimous consent under Standing Order 43 on a matter of urgency, namely, the failure at the conference of the International Commission for the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries to agree on the Canadian proposal for an immediate ban on high seas fishing for salmon. Therefore I move, seconded by the hon. member for St. John's East (Mr. McGrath):

That this House urges the government to immediately restrict all fish imports to Canada from Denmark, as a protest toward the Danish refusal to conserve the Canadian spawned North Atlantic salmon, and furthermore, if bilateral negotiations between Denmark and Canada fail to achieve a ban on salmon fishing off Greenland within the next six months, that the government undertake further economic measures against the Danes.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC SALMON-OPERATIONS BY DENMARK- REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Is there unanimous consent?

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC SALMON-OPERATIONS BY DENMARK- REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC SALMON-OPERATIONS BY DENMARK- REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

No.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC SALMON-OPERATIONS BY DENMARK- REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

The motion cannot be put.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC SALMON-OPERATIONS BY DENMARK- REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink
IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

There is not. The motion cannot be put.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC SALMON-OPERATIONS BY DENMARK- REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Permalink

June 5, 1972