November 10, 1970

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

THE LATE GENERAL DE GAULLE

LIB

Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Right Hon. P. E. Trudeau (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, we have learned with deep emotion of the death of General de Gaulle, one of the great figures of our time. I want to render homage to his genius as a soldier, and to the outstanding qualities of a statesman who, in his own lifetime, became an historical figure.

Even before the outbreak of the World War in 1939, Charles de Gaulle had shown an extraordinary understanding of the dimensions of modem war. But the defeat and occupation of France brought out in him, during long and hard years, the courage and pride of the patriot in exile, and the patience and authority of the politician. During the war he embodied for millions of men the hope of liberation; single-handed, so to speak, he sought to preserve, and afterwards sustain, the permanence of France, which owes to him the fact of having found once again its high place in the concert of nations.

Mr. Speaker, the departure of Charles de Gaulle calls up everywhere a great surge of memories. A great man has just died. To the French people and Government, I express our profound sympathy.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   THE LATE GENERAL DE GAULLE
Sub-subtopic:   EXPRESSION OF TRIBUTE AND SYMPATHY
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prince Albert):

Mr. Speaker, I join with the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau) in his eloquent words concerning General de Gaulle. I knew the General very well. I met him on a number of occasions. One of my treasured memories will be that a few days ago I received from him a volume of his memoirs inscribed with a personal message, the acknowledgement of which he will never receive.

[DOT] (2:10 p.m.)

He was one of those personalities who are above age, who lived in his day and generation and made a contribution not only to freedom in his own time but for all mankind. He was, as the Prime Minister said, a prophet in the years between 1935 and 1939-a prophet without honour in his own country. Indomitable, incorruptible, inflexible-he stood for what he believed. In the dark days of war there were many who were pessimists when France was down, he was never one of them. He stood

and in the clarion words of freedom predicted over and over again that victory would ultimately come.

Everyone, however great, is entitled to make mistakes. Many will recall his words in this country in 1967. This is no occasion to weigh those words. The moving finger writes and, having writ, moves on. But whatever mistakes he made he will always be remembered in the eternal books of history and will always have an overwhelming credit in those books.

With the approach of Remembrance Day I recall November 1958, when he asked me whether I would be willing to go to Verdun on November 11, Remembrance Day, and be in the saluting stand as the legions of France moved past. It was in the battle of Verdun that he was wounded. It was there, in the saddest charnel place in all the world, where some 700,000 Frenchmen and Germans met their deaths in support of those things for which they stood. The General said he himself could not be present because of his memories of those days of the Battle of Verdun. As I walked over that battlefield I could not but recall the awfulness of what took place during those dark years when he gave his dedication to devoting the rest of his life for peace for all time.

I recall him in Ottawa in 1960. He spoke in the most feeling terms of Canada's sacrifice. He was with Churchill, when freedom was under siege, when for a period of a year and a half we in the Commonwealth and France were alone. He never lost faith.

I remember him as an orator, a model for orators. Beset by blindness he would have read over to him a speech that was prepared by himself, and he would deliver it as it was written in the ringing words of freedom. The last of the titans of the second world war have now departed. He is the last of them. His memory will live for all time.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   THE LATE GENERAL DE GAULLE
Sub-subtopic:   EXPRESSION OF TRIBUTE AND SYMPATHY
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NDP

David Lewis (Parliamentary Leader of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Lewis (York South):

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the New Democratic Party, I wish to express our grief on the occasion of the passing of General de Gaulle. It is true that his relations with Canada were at times marred by his intervention in the rather delicate question of our national unity. However, he will remain a very famous man. As commander of the French resistance forces and leader of France during the Algerian crisis he ranks high among the great patriots in world's history.

He had an incredible moral fortitude and a very remarkable literary talent. His autobiography sheds light on an era in which he played a predominant part.

It is obvious, Mr. Speaker, that even after his retirement as President of France, his influence remained and will probably diminish very slowly after his death.

November 10, 1970

Tribute to Late General de Gaulle

Some of us may have wondered about his preoccupation with grandeur, may have disagreed with him on some aspects of his social philosophy and may have worried about his nuclear policy, but we cannot deny that he was an outstanding statesman, whose devotion to France and French culture was unlimited.

We join with the Prime Minister in offering Mrs. de Gaulle and the French people our most sincere sympathy.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   THE LATE GENERAL DE GAULLE
Sub-subtopic:   EXPRESSION OF TRIBUTE AND SYMPATHY
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RA

Gérard Laprise

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Gerard Laprise (Abitibi):

Mr. Speaker, as the previous speakers, I would like to say a few words on behalf of the members of the Ralliement creditiste, and pay tribute to a man whose name will go down in history, since Charles de Gaulle has left his mark as the champion of democracy during the last world war, while working without respite for the recovery and stabilization of France seriously affected by that war.

The military strategists consider that General de Gaulle was probably one of the greatest thinkers of the French army, when he devised even before the war the setting up of a highly armoured and motorized army. His plans were brushed aside and France was caught off guard by the German invasion.

Instead of accepting defeat, on June 16, 1940, he left for London where on June 18, he called on the French to go on fighting with Great Britain.

Thus, he gave the people of France new hope, brought to his side what was left of the colonial French army, and free French forces fought with Canadian and British troops until victory, when he was acclaimed as a liberator first in Bayeux then in Paris.

De Gaulle was not merely a military man but also a great statesman, probably the one who did most to rebuild France's world prestige that had been diminished by the weakness and the divisions of its governments.

Once more, he saved France from disaster. Following the events in Algeria and the threat of a civil war in 1958, the French people called upon him, and the General agreed to form a government.

He prepared a reform of institutions and at the next elections, he was given a great majority. Elected president of the Republic by 78 per cent of the voters in France and overseas, he governed according to the spirit of the Constitution and left a definite mark on French politics. He solved the Algerian problem, gave France a striking force, and kept his distance with regard to NATO.

De Gaulle was a controversial figure and will doubtless be for years to come because the Memoirs he has written and which have yet to be published in full reveal new aspects of the man.

I have just read this tribute: the Memoirs of de Gaulle will go down in history and be compared to Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic war.

We therefore join the Prime Minister and all hon. members in mourning the death of this great Frenchman.

[DOT] (2:20 D.m.)

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   THE LATE GENERAL DE GAULLE
Sub-subtopic:   EXPRESSION OF TRIBUTE AND SYMPATHY
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PRESENCE IN SPEAKER'S GALLERY OF PRIME MINISTER OF GHANA, OTHER MINISTERS AND OFFICIALS

IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

May I bring to the attention of the House the presence in the Speaker's Gallery of a number of distinguished guests. We are delighted to have with us for a few moments the Prime Minister of Ghana, the Right Hon. Dr. Kofi Busia, and Mrs. Busia. The Prime Minister is accompanied by the Minister of Industry, Trade and Tourism, the Hon. R. A. Quarshie, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Hon. Victor Owusu, as well as a group of senior officials of the government. We welcome these distinguished visitors to Canada's House of Commons. I am sure that hon. members would want me to express their particular gratification that under Dr. Busia's leadership Ghana has returned to parliamentary rule and continues to play a leading role in the life of the Commonwealth of Nations.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN SPEAKER'S GALLERY OF PRIME MINISTER OF GHANA, OTHER MINISTERS AND OFFICIALS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   PRESENCE IN SPEAKER'S GALLERY OF PRIME MINISTER OF GHANA, OTHER MINISTERS AND OFFICIALS
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ELECTION EXPENSES

APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE

LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen (President of the Privy-Council):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask unanimous consent of the House to name the members of the Special Committee on Election Expenses. If I have unanimous consent I should like to move, seconded by Mr. Macdonald (Rosedale):

That members of the Special Committee on Election Expenses be Messrs. Breau, Brewin, Chappell, Cullen, Deachman, Forest, Forrestall, Howe, Laflamme, Laprise, McKinley and Ouellet.

Topic:   ELECTION EXPENSES
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ELECTION EXPENSES
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Hon. members have heard the motion proposed by the President of the Privy Council. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the said motion?

Topic:   ELECTION EXPENSES
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ELECTION EXPENSES
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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Motion agreed to. * * sjs


THE CANADIAN ECONOMY

CONTROL OF PUBLISHING INDUSTRY-REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43

NDP

Frank Howard

New Democratic Party

Mr. Frank Howard (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, under Standing Order 43 there is provision whereby a motion may be accepted by unanimous consent if it relates to a matter of urgent and pressing necessity that has previously been explained by the mover. It is one of the few mechanisms that Parliament has available to it to deal with matters in a special way because normally Parlia-

November 10, 1970

ment has cumbersome arrangements for dealing with urgent problems. The sale or proposed sale of Ryerson Press to the McGraw-Hill Company of the United States has brought into very sharp focus the fact that we are perilously close to complete domination by foreign industrial and economic interests. What I propose by way of motion is to permit a parliamentary committee to examine this matter.

I might add as an aside that the request for unanimity also encompasses with it the idea that we do not seek to have any debate upon this matter if that is also unanimously accepted. Therefore I should like to move, seconded by the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) but with a companion and honorary seconder, the hon. member for Egmont (Mr. MacDonald):

That the Standing Committee on Finance, Trade and Economic Affairs be authorized to inquire into the steps which may be necessary to maintain Canadian control of the publishing industry and to permit the said publishing industry to enhance and develop its position and that the said committee report its findings and recommendations on or before December 15, 1970.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN ECONOMY
Subtopic:   CONTROL OF PUBLISHING INDUSTRY-REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

The House has heard the motion proposed by the hon. member for Skeena. The motion requires the unanimous consent of the House. Is there such unanimity?

Topic:   THE CANADIAN ECONOMY
Subtopic:   CONTROL OF PUBLISHING INDUSTRY-REQUEST FOR UNANIMOUS CONSENT TO MOVE MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
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November 10, 1970