April 9, 1970

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, members of the House may be interested in a brief report of my visits to Paris and Bonn in the past week. I went to Paris to open the new Canadian Cultural Centre there and to talk to Mr. Maurice Schumann, the French Foreign Minister, and to Bonn to return the visit paid to Canada last year by Mr. Willy Brandt, who is now the Chancellor, and to discuss matters of common interest with members of the German government.

Our new Cultural Centre in Paris will assist Canadians in France, especially students, and bring to the French people information about Canada, reflecting our bilingual and bicultural character and the many cultural strands that make up the Canadian fabric. The director of the centre is Mr. Guy Viau who was assistant director of the National Gallery here before taking up his new responsibilities. Mr. Viau is particularly well qualified for the job and I am sure that the centre, under his direction, will forge new ties between Canada and France.

The interest of the French government and the people in the new centre and in Canada as a meeting place of two great cultures was well expressed by the French government's representative at the inaugural ceremonies, Mr. Leo Hamon, who said:

What makes your country unique is the imbrication and the juxtaposition of its two cultures. This centre will fully reflect the originality and the wealth of resources of a country intent on retaining its own personality in the New World notwithstanding the size and power of its southern neighbour, which can be achieved only by preserving its diversity.

[DOT] (2:10 p.m.)

In Paris I met with the French Foreign Minister, Mr. Maurice Schumann. The principal subject we discussed was our bilateral relations, and the most important part for me was Mr. Schumann's categorical statement that the French government has absolutely no intention of intervening in the internal affairs of Canada. If there is no misunderstanding between us about this, and I hope there is not, our problems will be easier to deal with in the future.

I explained to Mr. Schumann what I consider to be the three basic elements on which good relations between France and Canada should rest: First, that co-operation between France and Quebec, which we regard as being of first importance, must be carried out in consultation with the Canadian government; second, that co-operation between France and Canada must be practical in nature and not confined to expressions of good will; third, that France must avoid taking positions contrary to the Canadian constitution.

As a result of this frank exchange I feel we have laid a foundation for avoiding in future some of the incidents which have in the past caused unnecessary strain and tension between us.

In Bonn my objective was to establish a better mutual understanding of our respective policies on international problems of common concern, and to prepare the way for more intensive bilateral co-operation between our two countries.

I got a first-hand account from the German Foreign Minister, Mr. Walter Scheel, of the federal government's efforts to improve relations with their eastern neighbours and to develop a more integrated community in western Europe, efforts which naturally form an overwhelming part of German preoccupations at the moment. I expressed the admiration of the Canadian government for the courage, imagination and realism of the federal government in these efforts.

The Germans expressed their appreciation for Canadian understanding and support. They also stressed the importance they attached to the maintenance of an active Canadian role in both the defence and detente

April 9, 1970

Minister's Visit to Paris and Bonn efforts of NATO. I reaffirmed the importance for Canada of our ties with Europe not only from the security point of view but also as a means of diversifying our external relations.

I discussed with several members of the German federal government ways of strengthening the functional co-operation between our two countries, particularly in the fields of science and technology, where both countries have something to contribute and something to gain from more intensive and systematic exchanges. We agreed to proceed in a pragmatic way to identify specific areas where the prospects for such exchanges are most promising. I hope it will be possible to send a mission to the German Federal Republic in the year to follow up these initiatives in greater detail.

I took the opportunity of these visits to let both the French and German governments know of the Canadian government's concerns about the repercussions of certain commercial and agricultural policies of the European Economic Community, particularly in relation to grain production and trade. Our desire is to increase consultations with the EEC on these matters so that the transatlantic co-operation to which we attach so much importance will be strengthened rather than weakened.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT BY MINISTER ON VISITS TO PARIS AND BONN
Permalink
PC

Gerald William Baldwin (Official Opposition House Leader; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. G. W. Baldwin (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, we all welcome the minister back from his wanderings. I hope he will excuse me if I say I was given no previous notice of his intention to make a statement, nor do I have a copy of Sharp's Travels to assist me in my comments. However, after listening to him I can readily understand why that material might not be necessary.

We are happy that the minister visited France. Anything that can be done to improve relations between this country and France, and with the other European countries he visited, will be welcomed by us. No doubt we shall have an opportunity to comment further when we have examined the minister's statement in more detail.

The only further comment I would make is that it is probably unfortunate the minister did not remain here. He might have been helpful in preventing the action of the government and the Prime Minister in throwing away, by the introduction of bills and by other statements made yesterday, the legal works built up over a great many years by every Prime Minister from Laurier to the Right Hon. Lester B. Pearson in establishing a claim to sovereignty over the Canadian Arctic. All of this was disposed of, notwithstanding

the legal phraseology and the petty quibbling of the Prime Minister and the government yesterday.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT BY MINISTER ON VISITS TO PARIS AND BONN
Permalink
NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Nanaimo-Cowichan-The Islands):

Mr. Speaker, we in this party are very glad to see the Secretary of State for External Affairs back in his place. We have listened with interest to his travelogue which might be described as "Innocence Abroad". We also listened with interest to the report he has given the House. Certainly all of us share the minister's hope that our relations with France will be greatly improved as a result of his visit and as a result of the better understanding that has been developing in recent months.

I was disappointed in press reports during the minister's visit which attributed to him statements that appeared to pour cold water on a full-fledged conference between the eastern and western powers as the government of Finland has been urging. The minister appeared to follow the line that no such conference would be valuable until all the i's were dotted and all the t's had been crossed. I think there are a great many Canadians and people throughout the world who feel that such a conference would be useful, that events are moving at such a rapid pace that any delay in the holding of such conference could prevent beneficial effects flowing from it.

The minister made no mention in his statement whether or not he had any discussions with the governments of France and Germany respecting the situation in Greece. There is increasing concern in Canada about the actions of the military dictatorship in Greece. Canadians feel that being associated with this dictatorship in NATO does not strengthen the hand either of NATO or of democratic countries. If the minister did have any discussions with respect to the attitude that the NATO countries are going to take to the military regime in Greece, I hope he will make a statement. If he did not have such discussions, I trust that discussions will be opened at the earliest possible date.

The minister also mentioned some discussions about the European Economic Community. I had hoped he would be able to tell us whether or not he was able to enter into any arrangements with the government of France respecting closer adherence to the International Grains Arrangement, since France is now one of the major exporters and also one of the countries that has been selling grain considerably below the floor in

April 9. 1970 COMMONS

the agreement. I hope that as a result of the minister's visit and any follow-up from it we can expect better co-operation among the signatories to the International Grains Arrangement than has been evident up until now.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT BY MINISTER ON VISITS TO PARIS AND BONN
Permalink
RA

Gérard Laprise

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Gerard Laprise (Abilibi):

Mr. Speaker,

I have only a brief comment after the statement just made by the Secretary of State for External Affairs.

I listened carefully to what he had to say about his trip and I hope the meetings he attended will enable us to improve our relations with the countries he visited. However, I am concerned about a news item heard here during his trip; the minister did not refer to it during his statement and it had to do with the negotiations aimed at recognizing Communist China.

Apparently, the minister declared in Germany that if Red China were recognized, the representatives of Taiwan in Canada would be asked to leave. I hope nothing will come out of this statement and that, if it becomes necessary to recognize Communist China, he will find a way to maintain cordial relations with the representatives of free China.

[DOT] (2:20 p.m.)

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT BY MINISTER ON VISITS TO PARIS AND BONN
Permalink

ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

TAXATION

PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Hon. George Hees (Prince Edward-Has-lings):

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Prime Minister. As the presidents of our largest petroleum and iron ore companies have stated recently that if the white paper proposals become law projects worth many hundreds of millions of dollars will not be economic and will have to be discarded, and as the Minister of Finance has said he intends to make changes in the white paper before it becomes law, will the government take the very earliest possible opportunity to announce to the country what the proposed changes are before we lose these very important projects due to the uncertainty which exists today?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   TAXATION
Sub-subtopic:   WHITE PAPER ON REFORM-REQUEST FOR ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGES
Permalink
LIB

Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Righi Hon. P. E. Trudeau (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I am afraid I cannot give that undertaking as regards time. The undertaking

Inquiries of the Ministry has been made, and I repeat, that the white paper is for the purpose of discussion. After we have heard opinions from all sections of the community we will, of course, bring in legislation indicating the government's final opinion on all of these matters. In the meantime, beyond the commitment that we will examine all representations very seriously, I cannot make any statement at the moment as to whether we will have a second edition of the white paper. I do not, for the time being, think that that is called for.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   TAXATION
Sub-subtopic:   WHITE PAPER ON REFORM-REQUEST FOR ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGES
Permalink

DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT ON SUBSTITUTION OF TARIFFS FOR QUOTAS ON OIL IMPORTS FROM CANADA

PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Hon. George Hees (Prince Edward-Has-tings):

Mr. Speaker, I have a supplementary question for the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources. Has the minister anything he can bring the House up to date on regarding discussions he has had with Labour Secretary George Shultz, the chairman of the President's task force on oil imports, delaying with the subject Mr. Shultz discussed in Montreal yesterday when he said the United States would like to discuss quota-free importation of Canadian oil into the United States market and the substitution of tariffs for quotas?

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT ON SUBSTITUTION OF TARIFFS FOR QUOTAS ON OIL IMPORTS FROM CANADA
Permalink
LIB

John James Greene (Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. J. J. Greene (Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources):

Mr. Speaker, I have had no particular discussions with Secretary Shultz in this regard, although earlier in the year I had discussions with Secretary of the Interior Hickel when I reiterated the Canadian position that it would be to the advantage of both countries to have an open border in regard to crude oil trade.

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT ON SUBSTITUTION OF TARIFFS FOR QUOTAS ON OIL IMPORTS FROM CANADA
Permalink
PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

As Secretary Shultz has said the United States government is anxious to discuss this matter with the Canadian government, would the minister get in touch with Secretary Shultz as soon as possible to see what he has in mind?

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT ON SUBSTITUTION OF TARIFFS FOR QUOTAS ON OIL IMPORTS FROM CANADA
Permalink
LIB

Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Mr. Trudeau:

With hat in hand?

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT ON SUBSTITUTION OF TARIFFS FOR QUOTAS ON OIL IMPORTS FROM CANADA
Permalink
LIB

John James Greene (Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Greene:

Mr. Speaker, I believe as early as March of last year the President and the Prime Minister initiated discussions along these lines, and I am sure they will be followed in due time and in due course to the advantage of Canada, and particularly to that of the Canadian oil producers.

April 9, 1970

Inquiries of the Ministry

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT ON SUBSTITUTION OF TARIFFS FOR QUOTAS ON OIL IMPORTS FROM CANADA
Permalink

DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT REGARDING EXCHANGE OF COMMODITIES

NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Nanaimo-Cowichan- The Islands):

I have a supplementary question, Mr. Speaker. In view of the statement made in Montreal yesterday by Labour Secretary Shultz of the United States, may I ask the minister whether there are any discussions going on between the government of Canada and the government of the United States regarding the exchange of energy commodities and, if so, who is carrying on these discussions on behalf of the Canadian government?

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT REGARDING EXCHANGE OF COMMODITIES
Permalink
LIB

John James Greene (Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. J. J. Greene (Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources):

I do not believe there are any specific negotiations going on at the present time with the exception of the continuing discussions between United States officials and those of our embassy staff in Washington who are working on this matter on a continuing basis.

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT REGARDING EXCHANGE OF COMMODITIES
Permalink
NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. Douglas (Nanaimo-Cowichan-The Islands):

I have a further supplementary question, Mr. Speaker. If I understood the minister's answer correctly, any discussions that are going on are being conducted through our embassy in Washington. What are the terms of reference from the Canadian government to our embassy in Washington under which these discussions are being carried on?

Topic:   DISCUSSIONS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT REGARDING EXCHANGE OF COMMODITIES
Permalink

April 9, 1970