July 25, 1969

?

Some hon. Members:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanfield:

I would suggest, Sir-

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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?

Some hon. Members:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanfield:

I would suggest that my hon. friends save their breath and their voices because if they are disturbed by what I have

said so far they may need their lungs more for what I am going to say later.

There is no reason for the government to keep parliament shut down for almost three months, except the complete disdain of the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau) and the cabinet for this institution. They do not like questions, they do not like free debate, and they find parliament a nuisance and an inconvenience. They cannot quite do away with the institution altogether but they impose rules which will give them complete control over it, and they will keep it adjourned just as long as they can.

In view of the kind of parliament envisaged by this government and its supporters in the house, a parliament which meets relatively briefly to endorse the decrees of Caesar after very cursory discussion, it is clear that the attitude of the government and its supporters toward the institutions of government in this country, the attitude of the federal Liberal party, particularly those in this government, differs very little from the views expressed by General de Gaulle-a great soldier, a great patriot, a great man, but hardly a democrat as we understand democracy in this country. It is not for me to suggest what kind of government or government institutions are suitable for France.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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LIB

Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Mr. Trudeau:

Why are you talking about France?

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanfield:

As I say, Mr. Speaker, it is not for me to say what is suitable for France. But it is coming through loud and clear all the time that this government envisages periodic elections and government in the meantime by press conference and pre-sessions of parliament. It is true we do not have a president, but a rose smells just as sweet by any other name-or a carnation, as far as that is concerned.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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?

An hon. Member:

So does an egg plant.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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?

Some hon. Members:

Oh, oh!

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanfield:

Now we are told that parliament is to meet toward the end of October.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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LIB
?

An hon. Member:

That was a great contribution, Hogarth.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanfield:

I do not know. It might be put off for another year. In view of the problems that face the country, there is no adequate excuse for this action. The government

July 25, 1969 COMMONS

says it needs this time to get its legislative program ready for the next session. This is one of the most incredible explanations that could possibly be put forward at this point in time. The government was elected in June of 1968. This session of parliament began on September 12. It was stated in the Speech from the Throne, and it has been repeated numerous times by members of the cabinet and by the propagandists of the Liberal party, that the present session of parliament should be regarded as merely a "clean-up session", that the government, in its orderly and efficient way, wanted to tidy up all the legislative items that were hanging over from the Pearson administration. This session of parliament was chiefly to clear the decks for the new exciting legislation that would usher in the just society.

After spending a whole session of parliament dealing with legislative left-overs from the Pearson government, are the members of this cabinet seriously trying to pretend that they do not have a program ready for the next session of parliament?

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Eldon Mattison Woolliams

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Woolliams:

They do not have a

program.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanfield:

That explanation, Mr. Speaker, is just not believable, unless the government is more inept and dishonest with the people than we feared. It should be mentioned in passing that there were items, some of them very important, in the Speech from the Throne which the government has not yet brought forward in legislative form.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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?

An hon. Member:

Due to filibuster.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Sianfield:

I am not impressed by that interjection, Mr. Speaker. We hear all this talk about filibuster, and now the government is asking the house to recess for three months and to meet on October 22.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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PC
PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanfield:

It is comforting to have a government supporter show how hollow all this talk has been. What has happened to the educational television bill? What has become of that hardy, old perennial, the Canada Development Corporation? The government removed from the order paper the item having to do with the Indian Claims Commission, thus welshing once more on the understanding given to the Indian people. They have now decided to appoint a commissioner who, in effect, will decide whether there should be

Motion to Adjourn House a claims commission and, if so, what claims will be considered worthy of being heard by it.

[DOT] (11:20 a.m.)

What has become of this magnificently efficient cabinet structure, organized so finely that decisions roll out just as though they came from a computer? What has happened to it, Mr. Speaker? I suppose someone will tell us that committees are meeting in September and that it is a good idea to have the committees free to meet when parliament is adjourned. That is not the same reason that has been given to us so far in any explanation as to why the house is not meeting earlier. We have been told that the government needs time between sessions to get its program ready. This is very difficult to believe of this highly structured, highly organized, computer-like administration.

We have been told in the course of recent days that the government has urgent and important business to bring before the house when the session resumes. Some of it is even said to be highly controversial. This, we were told, was why they needed the weapon of rule 75c. Let us come back here in September and let us see that important legislation.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT TO OCTOBER 22, 1969
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July 25, 1969