July 10, 1969

MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Order. I have the honour to inJorm the house that a message has been received from the Senate requesting this house to unite with the Senate in the appointment of a special joint committee to consider the government's proposals for tax reform and also to select members of this house to act on the special joint committee.

Topic:   MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE
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ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

EXTERNAL AID

LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure that members of the house would like to know the steps Canada is taking as a result of recent developments in Nigeria.

I have instructed our High Commissioner in Lagos to tell the federal military government that Canada is prepared to supply the neutral inspectors both sides are ready to accept as a precondition for the resumption of relief flights into the secessionist territory. We are prepared to supply these inspectors for service either inside or outside Nigeria. We have urged the Nigerian government to give careful consideration to the acceptance of outside inspection sites.

We are told that if these flights are not resumed there will be countless deaths from starvation. Urgent action is required and Canada is ready to act urgently. Contingency planning is now under way so that we can move immediately if agreement is reached.

All interested parties are now looking to daylight flights as the best way of getting the food to those who need it. Canada has advocated this course for many months. There appears now to be agreement that a way must be found to get these flights going.

Relief flights in this civil war situation should be readily recognizable as relief flights and it should be clear that the aircraft are carrying only relief goods. If these things are done, both sides should be able to agree on the necessary details.

There is no problem identifying relief flights in the daylight hours. Our proposal to the Nigerian government further suggests that this could be reinforced by filing flight plans of agreed daylight flights with the interested authorities before take-off.

We are encouraged by the fact that the principle of inspection by neutral as well as Nigerian inspectors has been accepted by the authorities on both sides. We and others are continuing efforts to see whether agreement can be reached in this matter.

[DOT] (2:10 p.m.)

I must point out however that the success of our efforts, and those of others, to get the relief goods moving again regularly and in large quantity in!o the secessionist area still depends on the parties to the conflict. Unless they co-operate, a great human tragedy may take place. This we will do all we can to avoid.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   BIAFRA-OUTLINE OF STEPS TAKEN BY CANADA TO EFFECT DAYLIGHT RELIEF FLIGHTS-NEUTRAL INSPECTION
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?

Mr. R. Gordon L. Fairweather@Fundy-Roy-al

Mr. Speaker, I think one must resist the temptation to say to the government, "We told you so." This issue has been before parliament since last September and perhaps the words of this folk song are apt. They go something like this:

If I could have the world the way I want it, I would set these children free.

Some think that some of us here are becoming emotional about this issue. I do not apologize one whit for our emotions. Although the countdown tonight begins for what promises to be the most spectacular achievement so far of science and technology, the landing of man on the moon, it seems that man has not yet found a way to feed his brother's children. Actually, through the medium of joint Churchaid, Canairelief and the International Committee of the Red Cross, man has found a way, but his efforts have been frustrated by narrow concepts of national interest and thwarted by policies of non-intervention

July 10, 1969

External Aid to Biafra not now acceptable to civilized men. A delib- United Kingdom and I direct them to this erate policy of famine stopped those efforts; government. "We should now devote all our the world now finds unacceptable such poli- diplomatic power, all the influence that cies. We do not approve any longer of policies remains and all the effort of the government of non-intervention. to secure the effective relief in terms of food

We can do some things to help and I think we all welcome the positive steps the minister has outlined. Canada could also take other steps, such as providing a ship which could be used as a neutral site for discussions between Nigeria and Biafra. I notice that in his statement the minister referred to Biafra as the secessionist area. Calling it Biafra is better, I think, since we are all used to the name. We could also press more vigorously for the establishment of an agency of the United Nations which could provide formal relief to areas afflicted by civil as well as international strife. We are lucky now to live in a world in which people are increasingly willing to cross boundaries,-boundaries which are artificial, anyway,-and see that aid is given to people on the other sides of those boundaries.

The heading of the most powerful editorial on this subject I have so far read, contained in the London Times of June 28, 1969, is, "A policy of famine". The editorial says in part:

It is the principle of dissociation of sensibility_

outi sight out of mind-which permits the most evil things to be done by quite ordinary men.

I think a good many ordinary men of the world ought to be accused of this "dissociation". Arms supplied so cynically by the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and, to a lesser extent, France, have only served to make a terrible situation worse. I hope that in making this announcement the Canadian government is at last showing evidence of willingness to pursue a policy of supplying food and medicines to a distressed area now cut off by a government that feels starvation is an acceptable part of war.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   BIAFRA-OUTLINE OF STEPS TAKEN BY CANADA TO EFFECT DAYLIGHT RELIEF FLIGHTS-NEUTRAL INSPECTION
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NDP

Francis Andrew Brewin

New Democratic Party

Mr. Andrew Brewin (Greenwood):

Mr. Speaker, I warmly welcome the statement made by the Secretary of State for External Affairs. We understand that delicate negotiations are presently going on in an effort to obtain consent for daylight flights, which are essential if this matter is to be solved. In the face of what is an immense and grim human tragedy it would be wrong for us to speak in any but non-partisan tones.

I too would like to quote from the editorial in the London Times of June 28 to which the hon. member for Fundy-Royal (Mr. Fair-weather) has already referred. This is the tone of the spirit we should all have. These words were directed to the government of the

for Biafra at all costs and at once.

I welcome the fact that the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Sharp) has indicated Canada's willingness to provide neutral inspectors. I think this is an important suggestion. I believe it was made to the minister by Canairelief, which has played such an important part in the relief of starvation in Biafra. I agree with the hon. member for Fundy-Royal (Mr. Fairweather) that Canada should offer to take the initiative in providing a neutral locality for the parties to negotiate face to face, which might relieve the atmosphere of suspicion which the long distance negotiations have produced.

The arrangement as to conditions for daylight flights can only be made if the parties are brought face to face in the presence of some party which is neutral and friendly to both sides. There are two other matters which must be considered. I hope in future this government will direct its assistance to aid, not only to the International Red Cross, which has done a terrific job, but also to the joint Churchaid of which Canairelief is a part. This has been the most successful and effective agency. It has been assisted by the United States government and I hope this government will do the same.

I hope too that this government will follow through on the invocation of the jurisdiction of the United Nations to deal collectively in the name of humanity with the humanitarian problems involved. I hope this government will express publicly, repeatedly and clearly its objection to the importation of arms from Europe or anywhere else by either of the warring factions.

Having said this, Mr. Speaker, I am very happy to note that the government seems to be doing all it can to relieve this grim and tragic situation.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   BIAFRA-OUTLINE OF STEPS TAKEN BY CANADA TO EFFECT DAYLIGHT RELIEF FLIGHTS-NEUTRAL INSPECTION
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RA

Joseph Adrien Henri Lambert

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Adrien Lambert (Bellechasse):

Mr. Speaker, while listening a while ago to the Secretary of State for External Affairs delivering to us a quite important message, it reminded me of another message which we must never forget: Peace on earth to men of good will!

The Secretary of State for External Affairs referred to the facilities which Canada could

July 10, 1969

provide for the transport of food to Nigeria and Biafra and this is to the credit of all Canadians. I welcome the fact that the government is ready to provide the neutral inspectors needed in order to organize those relief flights.

Canada must do its best to help those who are suffering, because not only do we have food in abundance but we have surplusses, so we are told. Therefore, while helping those who are suffering, Canadians will be able, through their work, to make a greater contribution to peace in order to alleviate world suffering.

I really hope we shall find proper ways to organize those relief flights as soon as possible. Some were found during the war, for the transport of all kinds of weapons. So I hope that we, who are enjoying peace, will do all we can to help those unfortunate people who do not want war and who are the victims of war. This way, we shall contribute to the establishment of true peace in the world.

[DOT] (2:20 p.m.)

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   BIAFRA-OUTLINE OF STEPS TAKEN BY CANADA TO EFFECT DAYLIGHT RELIEF FLIGHTS-NEUTRAL INSPECTION
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MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY

NDP

Frank Howard

New Democratic Party

Mr. Frank Howard (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to ask leave, seconded by the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles), to move the adjournment of the house under Standing Order 26 for the purpose of discussing a specific and important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely the failure of the government to have consulted the native Indian people in Canada in the development of its policy statement on Indian Affairs presented to this house on June 25, the almost universal rejection of this policy statement by Indian people, the growing discontent among Indian people over the manner in which the government has treated them both with respect to the policy statement and in general terms, the refusal of the government so far to indicate it is prepared to enshrine in the constitution those aboriginal and hereditary rights arising out of the treaties, and the similar rights relating to land, resources and the like in areas where no treaties exist, the general refusal of the government to enter into meaningful discussions with the native peoples of Canada over such

Indian Affairs

rights and inheritances, and the attendant possible turbulence and fury which may follow from the aforementioned.

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

The hon. member for Skeena (Mr. Howard) gave the Chair the necessary notice pursuant to the provisions of Standing Order 26 and I have had an opportunity to study his proposal at length and in depth.

There is no doubt but that the question raised by the hon. member's proposed motion is one of importance; indeed it is one which I am sure is of deep and continuing interest to all hon. members of the house. However this is not the only consideration which the Chair has to take into account in making a ruling at this point. The Speaker has to determine whether under the terms of Standing Order 26 the house should be adjourned for the purpose of a debate on the subject matter dealt with in the hon. member's motion.

I have suggested before that Standing Order 26 requires a statement of the problem and that hon. members should not attempt to argue the case for or against the adjournment of the house. It is a bit difficult to determine in the hon. member's motion what is the statement of the matter requiring urgent consideration and what might be considered argument in support of his proposal for the adjournment of the house.

The hon. member for Skeena (Mr. Howard) has based his motion on what he terms, and I quote from his statement to the house

-the failure of the government to have consulted the native Indian people of Canada in the development of Its policy statement on Indian affairs presented to this house on June 25.

This statement is accompanied by a number of additional statements which might well be interpreted as debate or argument. In any event my understanding or interpretation of the hon. member's motion is that he calls into question the failure or alleged failure of the government to hold consultations with the Indian people of Canada in the development of the policy announced on June 25 last. Essentially the hon. member's complaint deals with matters of record which are already some weeks old. I have serious doubts as to whether the debate today could correct a situation which occurred before June 25.

According to my interpretation of Standing Order 26 and my understanding of the motion proposed by the hon. member, it is not open to the Chair to agree to the adjournment of the house at this time under the provisions of that standing order.

July 10, 1969

Inquiries of the Ministry

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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NDP

Frank Howard

New Democratic Party

Mr. Howard (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, I intend to do this, anyway; but I give Your Honour notice of my desire to rewrite the motion in accordance with your prescription and present it again tomorrow.

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Before the next item of business is called I might add that notice of a proposed motion was received over the signature of the hon. member for Grand Falls-White Bay-Labrador (Mr. Peddle). It is my understanding the proposed motion was not submitted for the consideration of the Chair within the time limit prescribed by the rules. I wonder whether tomorrow or on some other occasion the hon. member might not consider the advisability of giving the necessary notice as required by the rule.

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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PC

Ambrose Hubert Peddle

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ambrose Hubert Peddle (Grand Falls-White Bay-Labrador):

I rise on a point of order, Mr. Speaker. Would it be in order for me to ask the unanimous consent of the house to hear the motion.

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

It is always in order-

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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?

An hon. Member:

No.

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

It is always in order for the hon. member to seek the unanimous consent of the house. However, there is at least one nay coming from the house.

Topic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN UNDER S.O. 26 INDIAN AFFAIRS ALLEGED FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT TO CONSULT NATIVE PEOPLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

INDIAN AFFAIRS

July 10, 1969