April 21, 1969

PRIVILEGE

MR. DUMONT-ALLEGED IRREGULARITY IN WINNIPEG MEETING OF AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE

RA

Bernard Dumont

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Bernard Dumont (Frontenac):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege.

During the meeting of the committee on agriculture in Winnipeg, held on April 18 in the Monarch Life Building, the chairman of the committee tried by devious means to stop the opposition from making itself heard.

As I wanted to ask, in the presence of the representatives of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatchewan Wheat Board and the Western Farmers, that the Winnipeg Grain Exchange which is exploiting Canadian farmers be abolished, the chairman of that committee denied me the right to speak.

So I submit that this committee should resume that sitting, in Ottawa, with all the representatives who were in Winnipeg attending, to prevent this time the use of such devious means.

I put forward this proposal in order to know the true exploiters in the grain trade.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. DUMONT-ALLEGED IRREGULARITY IN WINNIPEG MEETING OF AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
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ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

MISCELLANEOUS ESTIMATES


Sixth report of Standing Committee on Miscellaneous Estimates-Mr. Fernand-E. Leblanc (Laurier). [Editor's Note: The text of the foregoing report appears in today's Votes and Proceedings]


EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to table the joint communique of the fifth meeting of the Canada-Japan ministerial committee and to report very briefly to the

house on the very useful meetings which were held in Tokyo last week.

This ministerial committee is not a negotiating body but rather a means whereby ministers from the two countries can from time to time exchange views on the full range of bilateral relations between Canada and Japan, as well as on the international situation. The fact that Japan is Canada's third largest trading partner, now competing for second place, is in itself sufficient reason for periodic and high level discussions between Canadian ministers and their Japanese counterparts.

The need for and the utility of these meetings is enhanced by the increasingly close co-operation between Canada and Japan in political and other fields, both bilaterally and in all the major international organizations to which we both belong. Most of all however the meetings form an important part of Canada's role as a Pacific as well as an Atlantic country, and they also reflect the growing Canadian activities throughout the Pacific area.

I have taken part in three meetings of this committee in different capacities and, in my view, the one just completed is the most useful to date, in large part due to the increasing easiness of discussions over a broad range of subjects. This is not to suggest that we found a complete identity of views with the Japanese. We did not, and, where we differed, we both made clear where our differences lay. On bilateral matters, for example, as you will see from the communique, the Canadian ministers spoke with some vigour about certain Japanese trade restrictions which are causing difficulties for some Canadian exports. But one advantage of these meetings is to enable ministers to speak directly with their Japanese opposite numbers on matters which are of great concern to Canada.

[DOT] (2:10 p.m.)

In addition to expressing my satisfaction over the quality of the discussions, both formal and informal, which we held with our Japanese colleagues, I should like to express our thanks for the warm and generous hospitality offered by our hosts. We were able to visit certain areas outside the capital and to

April 21. 1969

External Affairs

get some impression of the cultural and industrial aspects of Japan. We visited the site of Expo '70 at Osaka and saw the Canadian pavilion, its outward structure now almost completed, and the pavilions of British. Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. The extent of Canadian participation in this world exhibition, and the fact that our visit coincided with a tour of Japan by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra are, I believe, further indications of the broadening and deepening of our relations.

It is of interest that a special newspaper supplement marking the visit was issued on the day our meetings began. The relationship between Canada and Japan is, I am convinced, a relationship which contains great mutual benefits and1 which in itself makes some contribution to stability and economic development in Asia and the Pacific region.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT ON FIFTH CANADA-JAPAN MINISTERIAL MEETING
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?

Mr. R. Gordon L. Fairweather@Fundy-Roy-al

Mr. Speaker, sometimes while we are preoccupied with other parts of the world we in Canada forget how important Japan is in the far east. I am sure the minister's visit there was of importance. I am thinking of joint efforts we shall make with the United States and Japan to conserve the north Pacific fishery. There will also, I hope, be an increase, particularly in coal and wheat, in our trade with Japan. If Expo '70 at Osaka is anywhere near as good as Expo '67 at Montreal was, the Japanese will do well.

A strong Japan taking its part in world international affairs is of increasing importance to Canada. I welcome the minister's statement therefore, and welcome his return along with that of his colleagues.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT ON FIFTH CANADA-JAPAN MINISTERIAL MEETING
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Nanaimo-Cowichan-The Islands):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure all hon. members welcome back our delegation from Japan. I expect most of us have seen some of the television shots of the delegation having tea with the geisha girls. I hope the Prime Minister will arrange for us to have a report of the extracurricular activities of the delegation, which may be more interesting than the report of their official visit.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT ON FIFTH CANADA-JAPAN MINISTERIAL MEETING
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PC

Gerald William Baldwin (Official Opposition House Leader; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Baldwin:

And less bland, probably.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT ON FIFTH CANADA-JAPAN MINISTERIAL MEETING
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NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader; Whip of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

The

Prime Minister is jealous.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT ON FIFTH CANADA-JAPAN MINISTERIAL MEETING
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. Douglas (Nanaimo-Cowichan-The Islands):

I hope the Secretary of State for External Affairs and other members of the

committee are planning at an early date to give the house more information than is contained in the minister's communique which has just been tabled. We shall be interested to know something about discussions touching on Viet Nam, in which the Canadian and the Japanese governments expressed the hope of seeing an early peace settlement.

I also hope we shall obtain further information showing whether both governments, the Canadian and Japanese, are prepared to take steps in promoting a peaceful settlement in Viet Nam. We shall be particularly interested in hearing the Secretary of State for External Affairs tell us at an early date about Japanese reactions to Canada's intention to recognize the Peking administration. A news release from Tokyo carried last Saturday in the Montreal Gazette says in so many words that the question of opening diplomatic relations with Peking will be discussed separately from the question of Chinese representation at the United Nations. Frankly I do not quite know what that means. Does that mean, and I should welcome hearing an explanation about this, that although the Canadian government contemplates recognizing the Peking regime it will not lend its support to the idea of having mainland China become a member of the United Nations.

The communique just tabled says that both governments are in favour of strengthening the International Grains Arrangement. I hope the Minister of Industry, Trade and Commerce (Mr. Pepin) will tell the house whether the Canadian delegation had any success in securing some markets for Canadian wheat. Most members know that, during the time the United States was selling below the International Grains Arrangement price floor, a very large part of the Japanese market went to the United States.

I hope the government can give some assurance that there is a distinct possibility we can regain that market. I also hope the minister will be able to tell us whether he had any success in reaching an agreement with Japan to allow Canadian rapeseed into Japan on the same basis that United States soyabeans are admitted, because we are operating at a great disadvantage in this market.

I trust that by a statement on motions or in some other form we will have a report at an early date from each of the ministers regarding discussions that took place, and the conclusions reached.

April 21. 1969

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT ON FIFTH CANADA-JAPAN MINISTERIAL MEETING
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RA

David Réal Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Real Caouelle (Temiscamingue):

Mr. Speaker, we are happy to hear from the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Sharp) that the Canadian mission to Japan has been fruitful.

Having visited Japan myself in January, I noticed that trade agreements1, co-operation and goodwill between Canada and Japan could be quite beneficial to our country.

During my trip, I noticed that the Japanese citizen was practising what President Kennedy said and repeated: Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.

Japan has a population of 100 million inhabitants. It is a populous country but not that much compared with other great countries.

Despite that, it is developing at an incredible speed in every field of economic activity.

The Canadian ministers must have realized that the more relations we have with Japan, the more we will benefit from them. I sincerely believe that we have everything to gain by having more contacts with that country than we may have had with certain European countries in the past, because we have more to learn from Japan than from Europe, from every point of view. I suggest that our commercial and cultural relations with Japan must be improved.

I have also noticed that the ministers discussed just about everything with their Japanese counterparts during their stay in that country. They discussed the wheat trade, for example, and I felt at a certain point, while I was in western Canada, that the five, six or seven ministers sent to Japan could have liquidated the actual wheat surplus in the western provinces and shipped a good part of it to those who need it, particularly to Japan.

Mr. Speaker, we are happy to see that Canada is taking the necessary steps to initiate and maintain closer and more extensive relations with Japan, and I am convinced that our two countries will greatly benefit from it.

[DOT] (2:20 p.m.)

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT ON FIFTH CANADA-JAPAN MINISTERIAL MEETING
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PUBLIC ACCOUNTS

CONCURRENCE IN THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-RESEARCH STAFF

PC

Alfred Dryden Hales

Progressive Conservative

Mr. A. D. Hales (Wellington) moved

that the third report of the Standing Committee

Public Accounts

on Public Accounts, presented to the house on Thursday, April 17, 1969, be concurred in.

Topic:   PUBLIC ACCOUNTS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-RESEARCH STAFF
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Is it the pleasure of the house to adopt the said motion?

Topic:   PUBLIC ACCOUNTS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-RESEARCH STAFF
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NDP

David Lewis (Parliamentary Leader of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Lewis (York South):

Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the motion, without qualification, merely to ask whether this does not present parliament, and particularly the Committee on Procedure, which has among its: membership the President of the Privy Council (Mr. Macdonald), the government house leader, with an opportunity to take a careful look at the staff which is being made available to all parliamentary committees.

If I am interpreting things correctly, then obviously the Public Accounts Committee found unsatisfactory the evidence which it was able to obtain from other sources, and has now decided it needs witnesses of its choosing in order to get all the information in a proper way. I think this is true of all committees. My remarks are not directed at any particular minister or any particular side of the house. I rise merely to underline my disappointment as a member of parliament that we have not made a great deal more progress on the idea of providing all parliamentary committees with the research, investigatory and other staff necessary to make the committees much more adequate and productive than they can be under present circumstances.

Topic:   PUBLIC ACCOUNTS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-RESEARCH STAFF
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LIB

Donald Stovel Macdonald (President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Donald S. Macdonald (President of the Privy Council):

Mr. Speaker, in response to the hon. member for York South (Mr. Lewis) I would point out that the Procedure Committee, as his colleague the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) will readily admit, agreed to determine its own order of priorities in proceeding with the various references before it, and the committee did not choose to put this question at the head of its agenda.

I believe I can speak on behalf of all members of that committee in saying we will be proceeding with the question of research assistance, among other matters; but it was felt by members of the committee that there was a pressing priority for the question of accommodation, and the reporting and transcription facilities of committees as a first order of priority, and it is with these that the committee has been dealing.

Topic:   PUBLIC ACCOUNTS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-RESEARCH STAFF
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April 21, 1969