March 12, 1969

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT


First report of the Standing Committee on Indian Affairs and Northern Development, in French and in English-Mr. Ian Watson (Laprairie). [Editor's Note: Text of foregoing report appears in today's Votes and Proceedings.']


THE EXCHEQUER COURT ACT

AMENDMENT TO ABOLISH REFERENCE TO BRITISH ACTS

RA

André-Gilles Fortin

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Andre Fortin (Lolbiniere) moved

for leave to introduce bill No. C-180, to amend the Exchequer Court Act.

Topic:   THE EXCHEQUER COURT ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO ABOLISH REFERENCE TO BRITISH ACTS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Explain.

Topic:   THE EXCHEQUER COURT ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO ABOLISH REFERENCE TO BRITISH ACTS
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RA

André-Gilles Fortin

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Fortin:

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this bill is to amend the present wording of the act which reads as follows:

The practice and procedure in suits, actions and matters in the Exchequer Court, shall, so far as they are applicable, and unless it is otherwise provided for by this Act, or by general rules made in pursuance of this Act, be regulated by the practice and procedure in similar suits, actions and matters in Her Majesty's High Court of Justice in England on the 1st day of January, 1928.

Therefore, Mr. Speaker, the bill I am now introducing, and which I ask the house to pass, has for sole object to amend the act so that procedural rules followed in the Exchequer Court are enacted by Canadians and for Canadians, and any reference to British acts is removed.

Topic:   THE EXCHEQUER COURT ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO ABOLISH REFERENCE TO BRITISH ACTS
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Motion agreed to, bill read the first time and ordered to be printed.


QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA-LINGUISTIC QUALIFICATIONS

RA

Mr. Fortin

Ralliement Créditiste

1. Among the 120 persons earning $17,000 per year or more at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, are there any whose mother tongue is French and, if not, what does the Company intend to do to adjust the situation?

2. What is the policy of the A.E.C.L. concerning (a) bilingualism (b) employment of French Canadians?

3. What is the total amount of the A.E.C.L.'s capital assets (a) in Ontario (b) in Quebec?

4. How many employees has the A.E.C.L. (a) in Ontario (b) in Quebec?

5. Does the A.E.C.L. propose to establish research laboratories in Quebec and, if not, for what reason?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA-LINGUISTIC QUALIFICATIONS
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LIB

Otto Emil Lang (Minister Without Portfolio)

Liberal

Hon. Otto E. Lang (Acting Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources):

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited reports as follows: 1. None. The Company will continue to seek to employ first class Canadian scientists and engineers whose mother tongue is French.

2. (a) and (b)-The same as that of the federal government.

3. As at 30 November, 1968-(a) $274,117,111; (b) $30,616,359.

4. (a) 4,038; (b) nine permanent; 50 provided under contract.

5. No. No prospect of availability of funds to establish any new research laboratory.

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA-LINGUISTIC QUALIFICATIONS
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THE OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER-REGIONAL DESKS

NDP

Mr. Lewis (Parliamentary Leader of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

1. (a) How many regional desks attached to the Prime Minister's office have been established (b) what is the total number of regional desks the government plans to establish?

2. In which communities will each of the regional desks be located?

3. What is the geographical area of responsibility of each of the regional desks?

Questions

4. (a) How many personnel will each regional desk employ (b) what classifications and salary levels will be assigned to the personnel (c) what are the names, addresses and classifications of personnel now appointed?

5. What terms of reference have been assigned to the regional desks (i.e. what are their duties, responsibilities and to whom do they report) ?

6. By what means are regional desk personnel selected (a) by the Public Service Commission (b) by the Prime Minister's Special Assistant (Regional Advisor) in charge of regional desks (c) other and please specify?

7. What access will individual Members of Parliament have to the facilities of the regional desks?

8. Will the problems of citizens which come to the attention of the regional desks be referred to (a) the Prime Minister (b) the department concerned (c) the Member of Parliament for the area (d) other and please specify?

9. Will the regional desks be located (a) in existing federal buildings (b) in rented accommodation (c) if (b), what is the estimated total annual cost for accommodation?

10 (a) How many volunteer advisers has the Prime Minister appointed and what are their names (b) what, if any, is their relationship to the regional desks (c) do the advisers report directly to the Prime Minister, or to a Committee or Committees of the Cabinet, or to a member or members of the Privy Council staff (d) how and from what source are the expenses of the advisers being or to be paid?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   THE OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER-REGIONAL DESKS
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LIB

James Edgar Walker (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister)

Liberal

Mr. J. E. Walker (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister):

1. (a) Three, (b) No final decision has been reached, but the total number of regional desks established will probably not exceed four.

2. The regional desks are located in Ottawa.

3. Of the three regional desks now established, one is responsible for the geographic area represented by the four Atlantic provinces, another is responsible for the geographic area represented by the four western provinces, the other is responsible for the geographic area represented by Quebec.

4. (a) One regional desk officer with supporting clerical staff; (b) The classification and salary level assigned to each regional desk officer is a matter of negotiation upon appointment. The salary levels of the three regional desk officers already appointed are $15,000, $12,000 and $9,500 respectively; (c) Jean Hache, 1435 Morriset Street, Ottawa, Atlantic Desk Officer; David Thomson, 576 MacLaren Street, Ottawa, Western Desk Officer; Jean Prieur, 56 Les Erables, Laval-sur-le-Lac, Quebec, Quebec Desk Officer. Mr. Hache is classified as a Special Assistant; Mr. Thomson is classified as a Regional Officer; Mr. Prieur is classified as a Regional Officer.

5. The duties of the Regional Desk Officers are to improve the liaison between the Prime

Minister and those voluntary organizations which concern themselves with issues and problems common to many Canadians; to act as an additional source of information and advice to the Prime Minister on matters upon which he has requested such information and advice; to be of assistance to Members of Parliament in their dealings with the Prime Minister and his office. These Desk Officers report to the Regional Adviser to the Prime Minister.

6. Recommendations for appointment of regional desk personnel are made to the Prime Minister by his Principal Secretary after consultation with the Regional Adviser.

7. See the answer to Part 5 above.

8. Problems of citizens which come to the attention of the regional desks will be referred to the Prime Minister, a Member of Parliament for the area, a Governmental Department, or other appropriate Government agency as seems most appropriate, having regard to the nature of the problem.

9. (a) Yes; (b) and (c) Not applicable.

10. (a) None. Many interested citizens do, however, write to the Prime Minister from time to time to suggest new policies or to comment on particular Government initiatives. The comments and suggestions of these persons are analyzed by the regional desk officers; (b), (c) and (d) Not applicable.

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   THE OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER-REGIONAL DESKS
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SEXUAL OFFENDERS IN PENITENTIARIES

NDP

Mr. Orlikow

New Democratic Party

1. What Is the total number of persons in Canadian Penitentiaries that have been convicted and sentenced under the Dangerous Sexual Offenders Sections of the Criminal Code, and (a) how many of those so sentenced have received paroles (b) how many have violated their paroles (c) how many have been re-convicted while on parole and was the offence the same?

2. What is the average stay before parole is considered?

3. What programs are made available to these persons while they are incarcerated?

4. Has the medical profession been consulted as to treatment being given, and (a) how many have received such treatment (b) how many failed to make progress (c) have any persons been denied such treatment if such treatment was recommended?

5. Has the government taken any steps in this direction?

6. Have the inmates a choice in case they wish to seek out such treatment and, if so, what provisions have been made?

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   SEXUAL OFFENDERS IN PENITENTIARIES
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LIB

George James McIlraith (Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. G. J. Mcllrailh (Solicitor General):

1.

73 persons have been convicted and sentenced under the Dangerous Sexual Offenders section of the Criminal: Code which was passed

Questions

in 1953: (a) 20; (b) 10; (c) 1, Offence was not Hon. H. A. Olson (Minister of Agriculture): the same. In so far as the Department of Agriculture is

2. Cases are considered as soon as possible concerned: The provisions of the Canada after admission, in any event within six Agricultural Products Standards Act, the months thereof, and the parole review date Canada Meat Inspection Act, the Destructive is fixed. Average stay before release to Insect and Pest Act and the Canada Grain Act parole has been 8.3 years (the range being govern standards for agricultural products from three years eight months to 15 years and processed agricultural products in inter-nine months). provincial and export trade.

3. A diagnosis of each case is made and includes an evaluation of the inmate's potential for treatment and training. An individualized program to meet his social needs is determined by the Inmate Training Board following reports from members of the professional staff. The findings and recommendation of the Board are discussed with the inmate, who is free to express his views. This program may provide for individual and group therapy in addition to the regular training activities which includes, educational, vocational, religious, recreational, social and trades training.

4. Yes. (a) 73 have received the available treatment; (b) seven are parole violators:

5. Every inmate is free to consult with the psychiatrist. The psychiatrist interviews any inmate who wants to see him or for whom treatment has been recommended. He will attempt to assess his personality, make a diagnosis and provide appropriate therapy and make other recommendations.

6. The treating psychiatrist decides upon the nature of the treatment which is felt best suited to meet the inmate's requirements, and if better facilities exist in neighboring outside psychiatric clinics or mental hospitals, the inmate is transferred to such institutions and will return to the Penitentiary when improved. If the Penitentiary Psychiatrist feels that he should have assistance in making important psychiatric decisions, he is free to call any psychiatric consultant he may wish to have.

For the past two years at the Penitentiary in New Westminster, research is being conducted by an Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. The purpose of the research is also to recommend suggestions as to better ways and methods of treatment.

Topic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   SEXUAL OFFENDERS IN PENITENTIARIES
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March 12, 1969