October 16, 1968

THE BUDGET

TABLING OF BUDGETARY PAPERS

LIB

Edgar John Benson (Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Hon. E. J. Benson (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table copies in English and in French of the usual budgetary papers. I would ask the consent of the house to have the papers printed as an appendix to today's Hansard.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   TABLING OF BUDGETARY PAPERS
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IND

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Independent

Mr. Speaker:

Is it agreed?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   TABLING OF BUDGETARY PAPERS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

[Editor's Note: For text of papers referred to, see appendix A.]

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Subtopic:   TABLING OF BUDGETARY PAPERS
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


FRENCH VERSION OF B.N.A. ACT

RA

Mr. Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Is the government taking any measures to provide an official French version of the British North America Act and, if so, when will such version be available?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FRENCH VERSION OF B.N.A. ACT
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LIB

John Napier Turner (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. John N. Turner (Minister of Justice):

While there is in use in Canada a generally recognized and accepted official translation of the British North America Act passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom in 1867, an official French version of the original Act of 1867 could, under the present constitution of Canada, only be provided by formal legislative action on the part of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. This would apply equally to the various amendments to the Act from 1867 to the present, except, of course, those amendments that by virtue of head 1 of section 91 or head 1 of section 92 may be enacted by the Parliament of Canada or by the legislatures of the provinces without recourse to the United Kingdom Parliament.

29180-'76$

Thus the amendment to the British North America Act that was enacted by the Parliament of Canada in 1965 relating to the retirement age of senators was enacted in both official language versions, English and French.

More recently, where an agreement requiring legislative implementation has been entered into between the Government of Canada on the one hand and the Government of the United Kingdom on the other hand, the agreement has been executed in both languages, both texts being stated to be equally authentic, and has been sanctioned accordingly in that form not only by our own Parliament but also by the Parliament of the United Kingdom. See for example the Canada-United Kingdom Income Tax Agreement approved by chapter 14 of the Statutes of 1966-67. The intention of the Government of Canada is to continue this practice, and to seek to extend it to whatever future legislation the Parliament of the United Kingdom may be requested to enact relating to Canada and its constitution.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FRENCH VERSION OF B.N.A. ACT
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CHANGES IN STAMP DESIGN

PC

Mr. Harkness

Progressive Conservative

1. How many changes In the design of the five-cent Canadian postal stamp have been made during the past year?

2. What is the average cost for designing, printing, etc., when making a change in the stamp?

3. What is the estimated extra return to the Post Office, if any, as the result of making a stamp change?

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Subtopic:   CHANGES IN STAMP DESIGN
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LIB

Eric William Kierans (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. Eric Kierans (Postmaster General):

1.

Ten, including the current 5 cents definitive stamp and the 5 cents Christmas stamp.

2. The current 5 cents definitive stamp was designed in conjunction with the 1 cent, 2 cents, 3 cents, and the 4 cents series at a total cost of $3,400. The cost of printing the 5 cents definitive stamp will depend on the duration of the period during which it will be in use. The 5 cents Christmas stamp was

October 16. 1968

Questions

designed in conjunction with the 3 cents Christmas stamp. The cost for the two designs was $1,100. The 5 cents Christmas stamp had an extended period of sale during which it replaced the regular 5 cents stamp. Approximately one hundred million Christmas stamps were required, the printing cost of which was $26,813. The average cost of manufacturing the required quantity of the stamps of each commemorative issue is $16,000. The average cost of designing the 5 cents commemorative stamps is $700.

3. The extra return to the post office as a result of introducing the current design of 5 cents definitive stamp and the 5 cents (1967) Christmas stamp will not be known until the philatelic sales of each will have been discontinued. The extra return to the post office as a result of issuing the 5 cents commemorative stamps is estimated at $39,500 for each commemorative issue.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CHANGES IN STAMP DESIGN
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RECIPIENTS OF TECHNICAL TRAINING

PC

Mr. Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

How many persons by provinces have received technical training under the Technical and Vocational Training Assistance Act, year by year, since 1st January, 1963?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RECIPIENTS OF TECHNICAL TRAINING
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LIB

Gérard Loiselle (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Manpower and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Gerard Loiselle (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Manpower and Immigration):

Under the Technical and Vocational Training Assistance Act the following number of persons received training since 1962. The was repealed in 1967.

Province 1962-63

Nfld. 1,012

P.E.I. 196

N.S. 2,153

N.B. 5,417

Que. 18,963

Ont. 27,643

Man. 3,745

Sask. 2,667

Alta. 8,740

B.C. 5,422

Y.T. -

N.W.T. 59

Canada 76,017

Fiscal Year

1963-64 1964-65

2,957 5,213

431 728

3,037 3,789

5,552 4,479

41,562 43,645

37,077 46,764

5,337 8,654

4,859 6,682

13,104 14,324

10,226 14,590

159 350

129 195

124,430 149,413

1965-66 1966-67

5,821 8,856

862 1,133

5,168 11,134

4,728 8,256

50,419 80,976

72,037 117,568

10,488 14,771

8,551 12,382

16,980 22,631

16,281 20,563

258 276

497 164

192,090 298,710

The training of the above persons was subsidized by the federal government on a cost shared basis, the federal contribution ranging from 50 per cent to 90 per cent of the total cost. In addition, the federal government contributed toward vocational high school programs at a fixed maximum yearly rate of $3 million.

The data refer to persons attending classes during a particular fiscal year. As the course of study of many of these persons fell into two or even three fiscal years, accumulation of the annual data would result in double counting.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RECIPIENTS OF TECHNICAL TRAINING
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RELIEF SUPPLIES FOR NIGERIA

NDP

Mr. Brewin

New Democratic Party

1. What proportion of the allocation of $500,000 announced by the Prime Minister on July 31, 1963 for the provision of emergency supplies from

[Mr. Kierans.l

Canada for relief of the area of Nigeria affected by hostilities has been expended?

2. What supplies have in fact been sent to Nigeria?

3 What portion of such supplies has been actually used in the area affected by the hostilities for the relief of the victims?

4. Is it contemplated that further allocations will be made?

5. What steps have been taken by the Canadian Government to remove obstacles to adequate distribution of Canadian and other supplies to the victims of the Nigerian hostilities?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RELIEF SUPPLIES FOR NIGERIA
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

1. Approximately $50,000 has been disbursed. (See also answer to question 4 below regarding expenditure commitments.)

2. Drugs, vaccines, antibiotics and dried salted codfish have been sent.

3. All the supplies have been used.

October 16. 1968

4. An additional allocation of $500,000 was announced by the Prime Minister on September 17. $875,000 has been committed to orders for additional shipments of fish and $75,000 for freight and wharfage charges.

5. The Canadian government has supported the efforts of the international committee of the Red Cross to arrange for delivery corridors into the areas of greatest need from outside distribution points. This support has included diplomatic interventions with the federal Nigerian government and public appeals to the Biafran authorities, with whom Canada has no official relations.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RELIEF SUPPLIES FOR NIGERIA
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MANPOWER PLACEMENT SERVICES

October 16, 1968