March 11, 1968

PC

Jay Waldo Monteith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Monteith:

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the minister when copies of the revised bill will be in our boxes?

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
PC

Robert Gordon Lee Fairweather

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fairweather:

The government is retreating but maintaining the initiative.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Minister of National Health and Welfare; Minister of Amateur Sport; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MacEachen:

It shows how flexible we are. Copies of the bill will be in hon. members' boxes tomorrow morning.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
LIB

Herman Maxwell Batten (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

Order. Is the Chair to assume that the house will now go into committee of supply?

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

The house in committee of supply, Mr. Batten in the chair.

DEPARTMENT OF SECRETARY OF STATE Board of Broadcast Governors-

1c. Salaries and other expenses, $35,000.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
LIB

Herman Maxwell Batten (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The Chairman:

Order. House again in committee of supply supplementary estimates (C), 1967-68, Department of Secretary of State,

DEBATES March 11. 1968

Board of Broadcast Governors, vote lc. Shall vote No. lc carry?

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
PC

Wallace Bickford (Wally) Nesbitt

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Nesbitt:

Mr. Chairman, I should like to make just a few brief remarks on this item. It would seem to me that the members of the new Board of Broadcast Governors, when they have had an opportunity to get settled, will realize that they should do something to correct what has gone on of late on the C.B.C. television news and news commentaries.

In the last few weeks there have been people in the country who have said they have seen nothing but a complete take-over by the government of the C.B.C. news media, and that the C.B.C. news has become little more than a government brainwashing operation. We saw a good sample of it recently, shortly after February 19, when the Prime Minister returned to Canada from Jamaica and appeared on C.B.C. television. The information that a number of us have been given is that the Prime Minister went on television that evening on the understanding that no other person would be allowed to go on the television after he appeared that evening, and that no commentary would be permitted on his remarks. When one hears these observations made by those who are in a position to know, it becomes very alarming indeed.

As most of us know, television is one of the most powerful media of information to influence the public. In recent weeks, within the space of three days, through the medium of television the names of persons little known to the general public became household words. I believe the new Board of Broadcast Governors should ensure that every effort is made to see that there is no interference by the government in office with the news media. Not only that, but they should ensure that there must appear to be no interference from within the news media. This is very important.

In addition to that, in the house and in other places, the suggestion has been made in the last few months that there has been some political interference with the C.B.C. I do not wish to rehash what has already been said in the house on other occasions, but I would certainly hope that the new Board of Broadcast Governors will take the greatest care to make sure that there is even no appearance of any control of the news media by the government, or indeed by any political party. I hope the new president of the CB.C. will bear this in mind when he assumes his new duties.

March 11. 1968 COMMONS

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
NDP

Robert William Prittie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Priliie:

Mr. Chairman, I should like to make a few remarks while we are on the item concerning the Board of Broadcast Governors. The hon. member for Oxford made a complaint about the news coverage on the C.B.C., and the leader of my party, the hon. member for Burnaby-Coquitlam, also made a passing reference to this subject in the debate which followed the February 19 incident. I am not inclined to make very much of that at the moment because the C.B.C. has a new management, and I think it is only fair for members of the house to give the new president and executive vice president some time to assume control of their jobs and make whatever changes they think are necessary in the operation of the corporation. So I will refrain from making any other remarks concerning the C.B.C. at this time.

The new Broadcasting Act has now received royal assent, and I wish to express the hope that the members of the regulatory authority, the chairman, vice chairman and the members who are to make up the new Canadian Radio and Television Commission, will be appointed without too much delay. We have been drifting for a number of years in the field of broadcasting, beginning with the Fowler report, which was followed by the white paper on broadcasting. Then followed the committee's study on the white paper, and then finally the long debate on the act itself.

It took the government a long time to find the personnel to head the C.B.C.

[DOT] (8:10 p.m.)

We understand a number of people refused the job. Let us hope that it will not take as long for the government to find personnel to man the new regulatory authority, because that body will have very important work. The new authority will have the job of controlling radio and television broadcasting in Canada. There are a number of very important things which have to be tackled and the sooner these people are appointed the better.

Then, I should like to refer to some of the items that need to be looked at in the very near future. We have had very strong representations made to the broadcasting committee about the employment of Canadian talent. This is a matter which really cannot be left too much longer. Month by month talented Canadians, actors, writers and producers leave for the United States and the United Kingdom. This problem, if allowed to continue for a matter of a year or two, will result in the loss of the pool of talent this

DEBATES 7497

Supply-Secretary of State country has to do the kind of broadcasting that should be done.

Another matter with which we are dealing in the broadcasting committee at the present time is educational television. One of the matters about which we hear a great deal is whether educational television should be on very high frequency or ultra-high frequency. Recommendations have been made by a number of groups that have appeared before the committee to the effect that all television receivers in Canada should be equipped to receive ultra-high frequency channels. They are not, as yet. Over two years ago I introduced a private members bill on this subject. There is a provision in the new act which would allow the regulatory authority to require Canadian importers or manufacturers to build into all T.V. sets the capacity to receive ultra-high frequency channels. I say this because there are sets still being manufactured without this capability. In fact most sets manufactured in Canada are in this category, and it is going to be essential when educational television actually gets on the air in this country. When that will be I do not know, at the rate we are going at the present time. So I do urge simply that the government, without too much delay, find the people necessary to staff the new Canadian Radio and Television Commission. This commission has in front of it some very important tasks. Enough has been said about broadcasting in general during the debate which took place only last month, so I shall confine my remarks to these few at the present time.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
CCF

Thomas Speakman Barnett

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Barnett:

Mr. Chairman, I rise on a point of order. Before we proceed any further with the consideration of the estimates I wonder if we could have some information from the government house leader as to which member of the administration is responsible for piloting these estimates tonight. Several times we have had the President of the Treasury Board in charge, but tonight perhaps it is the Minister without Portfolio who is sitting on the front bench. He always seems to be around whenever a crisis develops.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
LIB

Albert Béchard (Parliamentary Secretary to the Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. Bechard:

Mr. Chairman, in the absence of the Secretary of State who will be back later tonight, I am taking notes of the representations made by hon. members concerning these supplementary estimates.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
RA

David Réal Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Caouetie:

Mr. Chairman, I was glad to hear the hon. member for Bonaventure (Mr. March 11. 1968

Supply-Secretary oj State Bechard) say that he was taking it upon himself to listen to any matter related to broadcasting to which we might call his and the government's attention.

It is a rather costly service for Canadian taxpayers. It is true, as the previous speaker just said, that the C.B.C. now has a new management: new presidents, new vice-presidents and new secretaries. We can only express the wish now that this new management will take into account the true situation prevailing in Canada at present and that it will not try to lay down policies but rather to serve the best interests of the Canadian people.

Too often in the past, we have had to deplore serious mistakes on the part of C.B.C. officials, even some high officials. This makes us invite the new administration to be careful, to avoid errors as much as possible. Mistakes will be made, that happens everywhere-

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
RA

David Réal Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Caouette:

Mr. Chairman, if members hear me as well as I hear them, they hear me very well indeed! I understand that many of them are not interested in what we have to say about a state corporation, and that is why we see quite often that positions are taken which are not compatible with the studies we must make in the house.

Mr. Chairman, I do not intend to speak very long about the C.B.C. tonight. I would only say again that we want the C.B.C. to deal with everyone fairly and impartially, to give the Canadian people a just treatment.

In the past, we have seen certain groups receive preferential treatment while others were almost totally ignored. In my opinion, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation should respect all schools of thought in Canada and all should be allowed to express their opinion, for only thus, in my opinion, will we achieve greater understanding.

Everyone does not necessarily have the same ideas and opinions. However, the C.B.C. should recognize this basic principle and allow all groups to express their opinions, explain their program and put forward their point of view. This will help to create a spirit of good will and mutual respect in Canada.

Mr. Chairman, I said earlier that on many occasions, we had cause to complain about the administration within the C.B.C. For instance, with regard to news coverage, we are given daily reports on the Viet Nam war,

while current events in Canada are systematically ignored. We are told about terrible massacres which occur thousands of miles away, in countries where the C.B.C. sends reporters with cameras and so on. This is beyond me.

It is all very well to tell us what is going on in Viet Nam, but it is another matter to devote energies and millions of dollars to present solely, more or less, news about war and its atrocities. In my opinion, it would be more important to earmark that money for the extension of broadcasting services to those areas of the country which are still without them.

I want to mention, for example, certain towns in northern Quebec, like Chibougamau and Chapais, where C.B.C. television programs cannot be received. The inhabitants of Parent, along the C.N.R. tracks, cannot receive them either.

For six years now, we have been calling for television for the French-speaking citizens of British Columbia. We are told that when the necessary money is available, the French television network will be extended to the population of western Canada.

We hear in this house flamboyant statements to the effect that there is a wish to respect bilingualism, that the French-speaking citizens should have the same advantages as tire English-speaking, that they should receive equal treatment. But the only place where all Canadians receive equal treatment by the C.B.C. is in the province of Quebec.

Mr. Chairman, it would cost far less to the government or to the crown corporation to provide a French television service in the western provinces than to cover wars in Viet Nam, Korea, Africa or other countries in the world.

It is all very well to give us news coverage of current events but, I reapeat, we should first provide services for our own people at home.

It would be very interesting, for example, to have television programs showing the Rocky Mountains and the beautiful lakes in that region. It would also be interesting to see the sights in eastern Canada, in the maritime provinces and in the province of Quebec, for example: the Manicouagan or other very important industries, which would be of great interest to Canadians in the west.

Mr. Chairman, I hope that the new C.B.C. management will take into account the wishes of the people, which are mainly to know their country and be informed of what is going on

March 11, 1968

in Canada. The C.B.C. will fulfil this function when it informs the Canadian people of what goes on in Canada, on what exists in Canada, and when it stops spending millions of dollars to cover wars, murders and shameful events.

Mr. Chairman, we firmly believe that the C.B.C. can be useful. It must service Canadians and serve them with justice and objectivity, giving them the right to speak and respecting that right, so that the C.B.C. may be avluable and truly represent the Canadian people.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
IND

Joseph-Alfred Mongrain

Independent

Mr. Mongrain:

Mr. Chairman, we all

remember that the young lady who is Secretary of State said one day that there was something rotten in the C.B.C. That statement angered certain existentialist commentators. I have the impression, just the same, that among the members of this house, that statement met with the acceptance of most of us who are trying to estimate the work performed by the C.B.C. and that, in the party itself, it was agreed that there was much room for improvement in the C.B.C.

At the time when our government was putting forward the improvements, the amendments or the new organizations which we have approved, we hoped that the C.B.C. would give to the Canadian people something more objective and lasting under the circumstances, because we had all deplored, Mr. Chairman, the kind of infiltration which we have all witnessed. I do not think that it is some kind of partisanship merely reflecting electioneering, which is usually deplored, but even then, those conditions were so obvious that we generally recognized there had been some separatism and socialism infiltration within the C.B.C. and in certain fields for reasons which may seem evident to some, less to others, and perhaps also some people who reject all the principles in which we have believed up to now.

Mr. Chairman, I see that my hon. friend, the member for Lapointe (Mr. Gregoire), disagrees. I do not believe that he is protesting on behalf of that swarm of atheists who would like to bring into question again everything in which we believe, we the representatives of all Canadians, of all faiths or allegiances.

We have seen on the C.B.C. revolutionaries who did not even need the excuse of a more acceptable ideology to be given the right of expressing themselves on the air more often than their turn.

Supply-Secretary of State

Mr. Chairman, a few minutes ago, the leader of the Ralliement Creditiste (Mr. Caouette) said that the C.B.C. could respect all currents of thoughts. That was indeed the opinion of the government which established the C.B.C., of the governments which, ever since, have endeavoured to modernize the C.B.C. structures, and of parliament which has voted this year a very substantial budget to the corporation. I too believe that the C.B.C. should respect every opinion.

However, Mr. Chairman, when I watch the C.B.C. programs, I cannot help noticing that the Liberal party is being treated generously, which is only natural since it is the party in power; the same thing would probably be true of the Conservatives if they were in power. They would be treated just as generously, to be sure.

[DOT] (8:20 p.m.)

Members of the New Democratic party also appear more often than their turn, but I am not going to blame them. Perhaps, it is because they have members who are-how should I say; I am trying to find a word to which they will not take issue-who are more aggressive than the others and they happen to be on the French and English networks perhaps more often than would warrant their representation in the house. I am not going to complain about that, because every time they appear, they have something constructive to offer.

The same thing applies to members of the Ralliement Creditiste, but they enjoy an extraordinary advantage. Since they have no money of their own, thanks to the generosity of philanthropists or charitable people who want to save the race, they have programs on private stations to propagate their doctrine, their revalorization of the financial system.

Mr. Chairman, I have been sitting for two years and a half in this corner of the house, next to the door, on the first row. Therefore, nobody can call me a black-bencher, and I am one of those who are wondering why nobody thought of asking an independent, since we are so few. Until recently, we were four; we are now only three: one Independent Conservative, who persists in sitting next to the Conservatives, which implies that his views are rather conservative, the hon. member for Lapointe, my good friend, behind me, who is a Creditiste, a separatist, and an independent, because nobody else wanted him, and myself. We, independents, are of that breed of Christians who are alleged to have to accept anybody with all their failings

March 11, 1968

Supply-Secretary of State and all their qualities. We have accepted the hon. member for Lapointe even though we often disagree with him, and I say so with great kindness, because he also can, if need be, prove rather helpful to us, since he is much more familiar than we are with parliamentary procedure. I think of all that and, in conclusion, I see myself as a true Independent.

In spite of that agreement, the member for Lapointe persists in saying that I am a Liberal or an Independent who has sold out to the Liberals. If I followed his trend of thought, I could say that he has sold out to all types of independent ideologies because, from my point of view, there is only one Independent member and, I say it most humbly, it is the member for Trois-Rivieres; all the others ran under other tickets, either Independent Conservative, Creditiste, separatist. They now claim to be Independents because, ultimately, no one was willing to adopt them.

All this, Mr. Chairman, to say that it seems to me that the C.B.C. could, at least once a year for perhaps five minutes, or let us say ten minutes, invite the Independent members to air their views on national politics, to sort out what is good about the Conservatives, the members of the New Democratic party, of the Social Credit party, the Ralliement Creditiste, the Liberals and perhaps even the separatists, and try to make a synthesis, so that Canadian listeners might hear objective opinions; because the only ones left who can laud the ideologies adopted by their colleagues are the ones who bear the obvious label of as categorized a party as that of the Liberals, or the Conservatives, or the the New Democratic party, or the Ralliement Creditiste or the Social Credit party.

On the other hand, those who have some sense of solidarity do not say anything to harm their party; nor do they praise it too highly, for fear of being accused of prejudice, because we, French Canadians, are constitutionally modest. But there remains only one true Independent who ran under the independent ticket.

My friend, the member for Lapointe, claims that I am a faithful servant of the Liberal party, but he did not follow me in my last electoral campaign. He does not know that back home I had the courage to tell my constituents that I would not come here to oppose but to co-operate, because there is enough opposition but perhaps not enough co-operation.

Were the Conservative party in power, I should adopt the same attitude. I would have adopted the same attitude provided, of course the Conservatives had not made the same blunders as the Liberals, and I feel that things are pretty equal.

If I add up parliamentary childish tricks, and errors due to childishness which can be attributed to the Liberals since they have come to power, I admit, Mr. Chairman, that I start to worry. The situation we witnessed this afternoon is another example that strikes me as sadly convincing, that the Liberal party and the Conservative party need to turn a new leaf. That is what I have been saying for two years and a half in this house and I say it again, as a piece of friendly advice which is not necessarily destructive, although it seems to shock some of my friends on the treasury benches.

Mr. Chairman, I am still talking about the C.B.C. and I find it surprising-I see that everyone understands except the hon. member for Lapointe-that in view of its impartiality, at least that was the intention of the legislators and the leader of the Ralliement Creditiste summarized it when he said that the C.B.C. should reflect all currents of opinion in Canada, the corporation does not invite once a year, for five or ten minutes, the independent member who might be, for the Canadian people, the voice of the conscience of all those parties which have allegiances to respect and which do so sometimes at the expense of the simple and naked truth.

Mr. Chairman, I was shocked on many occasions. I shall mention one case so that the house will understand what I wish to illustrate, because most hon. members, at least the French-speaking ones, who have seen that program, must have also been shocked.

Time after time, young people of 16, 17, 18 and 19 years of age are invited on the French network. They come and tell us that God does not exist anymore, that religion is nothing but utter nonsense, a sham, whereas I believe that the young people of my province, who speak my language, have an entirely different concept of the religious philosophy which must guide a Canadian who has not lost his senses. I am surprised to see that the C.B.C. does not invite young people from my riding and others who are 16, 17, 18, 19 or 20 years old, who are still going to school and who could use their leisure doing things as frivolous as tearing down those eternal truths in

March 11, 1968

which we have all believed, whatever the language or the formula we use to worship the Creator.

[DOT] (8:30 p.m.)

Instead of wasting their time at such things, those young people should be doing, for instance, what we call charitable work or they go and work in underdeveloped countries in order to rekindle the flame of friendship for such developed countries as we are, although we do not always give them any proof, and I cannot conceive that the C.B.C. does not consider having those young people appear on those programs when they occupy their free time with so serious, so constructive and so conventional concerns. It seems that nowadays everything in which the community has believed for thousands of years, should be completely demolished for the benefit of a very small minority, either Catholic or Protestant, or whatever its allegiance. However, the fact remains that we all ask ourselves, whatever our beliefs, if the world in which we live has not had a Creator, and I am surprised, I am even shocked to see the C.B.C. featuring those nihilists, those intellectual revolutionaries who are barely old enough not to be in diapers and who come and tell us that God does not exist, that the religious principles in which we believe are all a sham and foolishness, and that we should not even consider them for a minute.

Mr. Chairman, if the C.B.C.-

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
?

An hon. Member:

Name the program!

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
IND

Joseph-Alfred Mongrain

Independent

Mr. Mongrain:

One cannot name them all. There is "Tirez au clair", for one, and a host of others! Seminary students are guests on these programs. Where I come from, Mr. Chairman, seminaries are religious institutions and I cannot but think that such persons are chosen intentionally, to bring them on television and have them hold such language. I live among French Canadian workers, whom I have known for 20 or 25 years, and I know that they are but a very small minority to think like that. I think that hon. members from the other Quebec ridings

I speak only about the French network programs, but I imagine that the same problem arises on the English network-take the same view, for mine does not differ so much from that of others.

Mr. Chairman, the C.B.C. has no true sense of values.

Supply-Secretary of State

The Secretary of State (Miss LaMarsh) was right in saying that something was rotten within the C.B.C. Whether existentialist newspapermen and the sophisticated people we have today like it or not, I think that, for the sake of truth and objectivity, we must repeat these things in the house.

Mr. Chairman, the C.B.C. should perhaps have invited more often-at least once a year or, to be reasonable, once every two years- the only independent member in this house.

I would add that my friends in the Rallie-ment Creditiste are truly independent, for they do not let themselves be influenced by all these partisan considerations. I am not ready to accept their financial ideology because I do not understand it. But their leader is a good teacher and perhaps one day I will finally understand it.

Mr. Chairman, are the actual values of the society in which we are living inevitably negative values? Must the representatives of the Canadian people, who are here to play their part, destroy everything that existed until now? Must we make a clean sweep of everything we had before to take up dubious doctrines which have not proved themselves?

I think that the C.B.C. fails in its duty when it allows revolutionaries, systematic wreckers to attack the eternal values in which we believe. I think that the C.B.C. should reflect the opinion of the majority, and see to it that most programs correspond to the will of the public.

Mr. Chairman, my conclusion will be modest and probably disappointing for those who are listening to me, but I should like to conclude by saying that the Secretary of State, that brilliant young lady whom we know and admire, told the truth when she stated in the house that there was something rotten in the C.B.C. But it is equally true that there are not enough independent members being elected and who could be the "voice of conscience" for all parties, by grouping all members of goodwill who are not free to express in the house what an independent member can express. As a matter of fact, there are among the Liberal and Conservative members, the members of the New Democratic party and the Creditistes, members of parliament who have good ideas and sensible attitudes.

I will stop here as I am well aware that this will not impress the C.B.C. But I should like to have the support of other members

7502 COMMONS

Supply-Secretary of State when I say that the C.B.C. is not commissioned to give subversive ideologies an exaggerated importance but rather to serve the Canadian people in what are their strongest assets, namely those truths in which the great majority of us believe, but which the C.B.C. has apparently been taking pleasure in downgrading those past few years.

[DOT] (8:40 p.m.)

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
PC

Edward Nasserden

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Nasserden:

Rising to say a few words on this supplementary estimate I would point out to the hon. member for Three Rivers that when he talks about mistakes the Liberals have made during the past three years he is talking about mistakes he himself has made, because most of the time he has been supporting the Liberals in the House of Commons.

I think it is appropriate that on a day like this we should be undertaking a study of supplementary estimates1-

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
IND

Joseph-Alfred Mongrain

Independent

Mr. Mongrain:

On a question of privilege. I should like to apologize to the hon. member for interrupting, but I have the impression he was speaking about myself. I missed his remarks because I did not have time to put on my earphone. Would the hon. member repeat, for my benefit, what he said?

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
IND

Gilles Grégoire

Independent

Mr. Gregoire:

Mr. Chairman, on a point of order.

Under the rules of the house-I do not know exactly under what standing order-it is forbidden to repeat the same thing twice. That is why, if the hon. member for Trois-Rivieres (Mr. Mongrain) is asking that, I wish to point out that it is forbidden under the rules.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink
IND

Joseph-Alfred Mongrain

Independent

Mr. Mongrain:

On the same point of order, may I say that I did not address the hon. member for Lapointe. I addressed my question through you, Mr. Chairman, to the hon. member for Rosthern.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   SUBJECT MATTER OF QUESTIONS TO BE DEBATED
Sub-subtopic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Permalink

March 11, 1968