January 22, 1968

HOUSE OF COMMONS DEBATES

OFFICIAL REPORT


27053-363£


ROGER DUHAMEL, F.R.S.C. QUEEN'S PRINTER AND CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY OTTAWA, 1968 HOUSE OF COMMONS


Monday, January 22, 1968


THE LATE HON. RENE TREMBLAY AND THE LATE MAURICE RINFRET EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET ON PASSING OF FORMER MEMBERS

LIB

Jean Marchand (Minister of Manpower and Immigration)

Liberal

Hon. Jean Marchand (Minister of Manpower and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, it is with deep dismay that I learned, as most members, of the death of Hon. Rene Tremblay which occurred just before noon today. We knew that he had been ill, but we expected that he would still be with us for a long time.

Mr. Tremblay had a rather brilliant career. He studied in Canada and in Europe. He was at first professor at Laval University and then became deputy minister of the department of industry and trade in Quebec. In 1963 he was elected member for Matapedia-Matane. Soon afterwards he was appointed Minister for Citizenship and Immigration-he was thus one of my predecessors-to become eventually Postmaster General.

Mr. Tremblay was not only our colleague, he was everyone's colleague and he was also a personal friend. We are of the same generation not only as far as age is concerned but also from a political standpoint.

You will understand, Mr. Speaker, that as other members of this house, we are particularly affected by this sudden demise, particularly when it is realized that it follows upon the death of Hon. Mr. Favreau and our friend, Maurice Rinfret. This might lead us to ponder on the effects on health of political tensions which may possibly be felt more particularly by the group to which I have the pleasure and the honour to belong.

The death of Hon. Rene Tremblay is surely a loss for the province of Quebec but it is also a loss for the whole country. I am sure that the members of this house will be unanimous in expressing to his wife and to his children their most sincere condolences.

Personally, I regret that, before leaving us, he did not have the good fortune of seeing certain injustices committed against him repaired as they should have been. But this is

probably what one can expect in politics; we are in a ring where the opponents do not always pull their blows and it is in circumstances such as those that we realize that we are mere human beings.

As I have already said, Mr. Speaker, to the name of Hon. Mr. Tremblay we must add that of another friend, a sincere friend of all, that of the hon. member for Saint-Jacques, Maurice Rinfret. He presided over the proceedings of the house with a great deal of humour, of kindness. I do believe that regardless of political affiliations everyone liked Maurice Rinfret. I think, therefore, that the house should also agree to express its condolences to Mrs. Rinfret.

Mr. Rinfret was ill for a very long time. He was seriously ill when he was last with us here, and yet he never complained and no one even noticed it.

At this moment of our political history, Mr. Speaker, when there are so many problems which we must face collectively, it is particularly painful to witness events such as these.

[DOT] (2:40 p.m.)

Topic:   THE LATE HON. RENE TREMBLAY AND THE LATE MAURICE RINFRET EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET ON PASSING OF FORMER MEMBERS
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PC

Robert Lorne Stanfield (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Robert L. Stanfield (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to associate myself and the members of the official opposition with the comments of the minister regarding the late Maurice Rinfret and Hon. Mr. Tremblay.

I was shocked to learn during the recess of the death of Mr. Rinfret who served in this house as the member for Saint-Jacques and as Deputy Chairman of Committees. Although it was not my privilege to serve with him in the house for any length of time, I quickly became aware of the position of respect and esteem that he held among members of all parties in the House of Commons. I was not aware of his illness and it was a great shock to me when he passed away during the recess of the house. Certainly we would wish to extend our sympathies to Madame Rinfret and members of the family.

Mr. Tremblay, as the minister indicated, served his province and the country in both elective and non-elective offices, having been in the public service of the province of Quebec before he entered the House of Commons. He was educated in both official languages and his education spanned two continents. He

57G0 COMMONS

Tributes to Deceased Members attended Laval and McGill Universities and completed his education on the continent of Europe.

Although he resigned from the cabinet over two years ago he continued to take an active part in and make a positive contribution to political life in this country, particularly with regard to leading questions of our day concerning national unity and economic affairs, which he was particularly well qualified to discuss by reason of his background and education.

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the members of the opposition I should like to extend my deepest sympathy to Mrs. Tremblay and her children, as well as to the members of the Liberal party.

Topic:   THE LATE HON. RENE TREMBLAY AND THE LATE MAURICE RINFRET EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET ON PASSING OF FORMER MEMBERS
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the members of this party I should like to join with those who have already spoken in expressing our very deep and sincere regret at the passing of two of our colleagues.

Mr. Ren6 Tremblay, who was for some time the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, we came to know very well. I can speak for members of this party in saying that we always found him accessible and courteous. He approached the problems of his department with a deep sense of humanity and with a fine compassion, which we greatly appreciated.

The passing of our colleague Maurice Rin-fret is also to be regretted, Mr. Speaker. Many of us came to know him quite well during his time in the house. Personally I had the privilege of being with a Speaker's delegation which visited the Soviet union and Czechoslovakia something over two years ago. We found him a delightful companion and a person who was deeply motivated for the welfare and benefit of this country.

We are exceedingly sorry at the passing of these two members of this house. We should like to extend, through you, Mr. Speaker, to their wives and families our deepest sympathy in their hour of bereavement.

Topic:   THE LATE HON. RENE TREMBLAY AND THE LATE MAURICE RINFRET EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET ON PASSING OF FORMER MEMBERS
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?

Mr. C.-A. Gauthier@Roberval

Mr. Speaker, the members of this group wish to join their colleagues in regretting the loss of two men who have laboured in this house. It is said that life is full of surprises and we have

tMr. Stanfield.l

DEBATES January 22, 1968

another demonstration of this truth this afternoon. I also believe that the two men whose passing we regret have served our country well.

In fact, Mr. Speaker, I had the honour of sitting with Hon. Mr. Tremblay on the committee on the national anthem of Canada and that is where I had the opportunity of realizing his good sense, his good judgment, the firmness of his decisions, as well as his deep convictions.

As for the lamented Mr. Maurice Rinfret, I could not imagine on Friday before Christmas, when he came to shake my hand at Montreal Central station before I took my train, that I was shaking his hand for the last time. Maurice Rinfret was a great friend and I am not aware that he had a single enemy in the house. His passing is a real loss for his party and for this house.

So, in the name of this group, I wish to offer my most sincere condolences to the two bereaved families and assure them that the memory of these two men will long remain in the hearts of French Canadians as well as of all Canadians labouring in this house.

Topic:   THE LATE HON. RENE TREMBLAY AND THE LATE MAURICE RINFRET EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET ON PASSING OF FORMER MEMBERS
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?

Mr. A. B. Paiterson@Fraser Valley

Mr. Speaker, as we think of our two colleagues who have been removed from our midst we share the sense of loss and the feelings of deep regret which have been expressed in the house this afternoon. Though we knew that Maurice Rinfret had been seriously ill, we hoped that he would return to the house and that he would be spared for a considerable time. It was a shock to hear that he had passed away.

It has been said that every member of the house held Mr. Rinfret in the deepest respect. I say that for many of us the feeling went beyond respect; we held him in affection, especially when we considered his qualities of character and the attitudes that he evidenced on many occasions.

We are reminded again of the shortness of life in the passing of Hon. Rene Tremblay, which was perhaps more unexpected than that of Mr. Rinfret.

[DOT] (2:50 p.m.)

I want to assure the house again that we share the sense of loss felt on the passing of these two colleagues and we join in expressing sympathy to the loved ones who are left, trusting that divine grace will be vouchsafed to them in this their hour of sorrow.

January 22, 1968

Topic:   THE LATE HON. RENE TREMBLAY AND THE LATE MAURICE RINFRET EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET ON PASSING OF FORMER MEMBERS
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

While joining, on behalf of all hon. members, in the words of regret we have just heard at the passing of Hon. Rene Tremblay, may I speak very briefly about the man who for two years was associated with the functions of Speaker of the house and Chairman of the Committees. A loyal colleague and a wise adviser, a faithful worker of the first hour and the last, Maurice Rinfret gave himself completely to his parliamentary responsibilities. In the discharge of his duties in the chair, he set at all times and in all circumstances an unfailing example of impartiality and honesty. The house will remember Maurice Rinfret as a good and fair man.

Topic:   THE LATE HON. RENE TREMBLAY AND THE LATE MAURICE RINFRET EXPRESSIONS OF REGRET ON PASSING OF FORMER MEMBERS
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PRIVILEGE

MR. WINTERS-ALLEGED INACCURACY IN NEWSPAPER REPORT

LIB

Robert Henry Winters (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Hon. Robert Winters (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I rise on a question of privilege. On Friday, January 12, the Toronto Daily Star misquoted me in a headline as saying of the government that "it lacks integrity". Mr. Speaker, I said no such thing. In fact, I said nothing which could be considered as meaning that the government lacks integrity, fiscal or otherwise.

In replying to a question I said that whoever becomes the new leader must attach great importance to fiscal integrity-the fiscal soundness of the country as a whole. In this, of course, the role of the federal government is just one part of the national fiscal structure. I was speaking of the country, not of the government, and in any event I did not say anything which would justify the attribution to me of a quotation such as that which appeared in the newspaper.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. WINTERS-ALLEGED INACCURACY IN NEWSPAPER REPORT
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. WINTERS-ALLEGED INACCURACY IN NEWSPAPER REPORT
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FINANCE, TRADE AND ECONOMIC AFFAIRS CONCURRENCE IN EIGHTH REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE


Mr. H. E. Gray (Essex West) presented the eighth report of the standing committee on finance, trade and economic affairs and moved that the report be concurred in. Motion agreed to. [Editor's Note: For text of report see Votes and Proceedings.] Statement on Foreign Exchange FINANCE


STATEMENT ON FOREIGN EXCHANGE SITUATION

LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Minister of Finance):

I should like to make a brief statement on the foreign exchange situation and table a press announcement made during the week end.

During the ten days preceding this week end there have been abnormally large sales of Canadian dollars in the foreign exchange markets, and we have had to meet these demands by sales of United States dollars from our reserves. This has been evident to those in the market and has been reported in the press.

This selling pressure resulted in part from widespread nervousness in international financial circles about currencies generally following the devaluation of sterling and the abnormal demands for gold. More immediately, however, it appears to have resulted in part from highly exaggerated fears of the effects on Canada of the United States balance of payments regulations, and misunderstanding of the intention of the United States authorities in that regard. In order to clarify this situation, we discussed it with the Secretary of the Treasury and his officers during the week end and they have issued a statement on the matter which has been reported in the press, and a copy of which I wish to table.

Topic:   STATEMENT ON FOREIGN EXCHANGE SITUATION
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January 22, 1968