July 7, 1967

TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK

LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, the Clerk of the house is discharging his duties for the last time today as he is retiring.

I have no doubt that all the members of the house will join with me in expressing our appreciation to Mr. Raymond for the outstanding and learned way in which he has performed his duties since his appointment to that important post in 1949.

He served his country for many a year, first as member of parliament and then, for 18 years, as Clerk of the house.

Allow me to express, in the absence of the Prime Minister (Mr. Pearson), our personal gratitude for his constant courtesy and untiring attention to administrative matters which are of such importance for the debates of the house.

Mr. Speaker, we all recognize that Mr. Raymond has served his country for a long time with great distinction; first, as many of us recall, as a distinguished member of this house and then, as we all know, for 18 years as Clerk of the House of Commons. The Prime Minister would like to have been here today to express his personal gratitude for the great contribution made by Mr. Raymond. It is my privilege in his absence to thank Mr. Raymond for his courteous attention to all of us and for the remarkable way in which, through his great knowledge of our rules and procedures, he has enabled us to carry out more efficiently the responsibilities entrusted to us by the people of Canada.

[DOT] (11:10 a.m.)

It is now my privilege to move a resolution, to be seconded by the right hon. Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Diefenbaker), which I am sure will meet with acceptance by all the

members of this house. I move, seconded by the right hon. Leader of the Opposition:

That the members of this house, desiring to record their deep appreciation of the long and distinguished services rendered by Mr. Leon-J. Raymond, Esquire, O.B.E., as Clerk of the House of Commons, and acknowledging the dignity and profound learning with which he graced his office, designate him as honorary officer of the House of Commons with an entree to the chamber and a seat at the table on ceremonial occasions.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, this is an opportunity for all of us to pay tribute to one whose contribution to parliament has meant so much. Mr. Raymond has been the friend of all the members of this house.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

I recall when he first came into the House of Commons as a member in 1945, and was re-elected in 1949. I remember his first days as Clerk of the House of Commons. I have recollections of the courtesy and innate modesty that have characterized him throughout, but I recall in particular the occasion in 1950 when as a member of the Canadian parliamentary delegation to the Empire Parliamentary Association meetings I visited Australia and New Zealand.

Mr. Raymond knows parliament both as a member and as a most distinguished Clerk. He has shown reverence for this institution, realizing at all times that unless the dignities and proprieties are maintained the institution cannot maintain the greatness of its traditions. The rules were his constant companions. He was guided at all times by the principle that while rules have to be made to maintain the operations of the house, they should not be interpreted in such a way as to curtail the rights of members.

As a student not only of parliament but of the law I am proud and happy to join in the resolution moved by the Acting Prime Minister. We shall hope that in the days ahead Mr. Raymond will enjoy health and happiness and that we will see him back on ceremonial occasions, filling with that dignity that has always been his a position that has added lustre to the parliament he has served.

July 7. 1967

Tributes to Mr. Leon-J. Raymond

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, the members of this party desire to associate themselves most enthusiastically with the motion before the house paying tribute to the distinguished service which has been rendered to this House of Commons by Mr. Raymond. In his public capacity he has served this House of Commons exceedingly well. It is true that we follow the procedures of Westminster, but our procedures and practices have to be adapted from time to time to meet our particular needs. This requires the genius of understanding and interpretation, and this the Clerk of the House of Commons, Mr. Raymond, has displayed to a remarkable degree. He has discharged his duties in a manner that is a credit to this house. He has maintained the high standard and great traditions of the office he has occupied.

However, I should like to add a further word and that is to speak of his personal contribution to all of us who have had the privilege of sitting in this house. His unfailing kindness, his innate courtesy have made him the friend of every member of this house. This has been particularly true of new members, who felt that they could go to him at any time and get the benefit of his advice and encouragement. I think there is probably no topic that has come before this house in many a day on which there has been such complete unanimity as that of paying tribute to a very fine Clerk of the House of Commons, a very generous and kindly gentleman.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
?

Mr. C.-A. Gauthier@Roberval

Mr. Speaker, for the French-Canadian group it is my privilege to represent in the house, it will be readily understood what joy it is for us to support the motion of the Acting Prime Minister (Mr. Martin) to confer the title of honorary officer of this house to such a man as Mr. Raymond who has given 18 years of his life as Clerk of the House of Commons.

Mr. Speaker, I feel that for us, a third party, particularly a new party in the house, we owe a personal debt of gratitude to Mr. Raymond for his warm and so understanding reception after our first election.

Mr. Raymond has always been also the first man for the new member to meet and from him we get our first greeting. For the second year member, Mr. Raymond has shown himself to be a valuable adviser, just as he was through the years for any member who sat in this house. Mr. Raymond has always been there to give us the necessary encouragement to fulfil our task.

We feel Mr. Raymond has been a model of simplicity and dignity in the pursuance of his duties. His undisputed competence, due to his thorough knowledge of the two languages, makes Mr. Raymond the perfect model of the Canadian civil servant. Through his frankness and his charitable disposition, and particularly through his fairness, he has earned the confidence of all in this house.

For us and for those who come after us, I feel that Mr. Raymond will be an example to follow, and we wish him long and happy days. Rest assured, Mr. Raymond, that we will always be happy to meet you and to shake your hand.

[DOT] (11:20 a.m.)

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
SC

Alexander Bell Patterson

Social Credit

Mr. A. B. Patterson (Fraser Valley):

Mr. Speaker, we wish on this occasion to join in expressing to Mr. Raymond our deep appreciation for the services he has rendered and to express our best wishes to him on this occasion when he is about to enter retirement.

Much has been said about the spirit of helpfulness and courtesy which has marked Mr. Raymond's attitude to the members of the House of Commons throughout the past years. Since coming to this house for the first time in 1953 I can certainly appreciate those sentiments because in my personal contacts with Mr. Raymond he has at all times evidenced a spirit of helpfulness and courtesy that made it easier to become acquainted with the house, its procedures and our responsibilities here.

Therefore, Mr. Speaker, it is with a great deal of pleasure that we in the Social Credit party support the resolution designating Mr. Raymond as an honorary officer of the House of Commons, with the attendant privileges that this resolution confers.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Minister of National Health and Welfare; Minister of Amateur Sport; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. A. J. MacEachen (Minister of National Health and Welfare):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to join in this formal parliamentary tribute to the retiring Clerk of the House of Commons. I should like to do this as government house leader, but more particularly for personal reasons. It is appropriate that we should acknowledge in this way the silent service of one whose counsel has played so important a part in the moulding of the practices and procedures of this house.

I know, as one who like most of us came to this house in awesome ignorance of its rules and practices, that I am grateful to Mr. Raymond for his great patience, his wise counsel and his friendly guidance along the

July 7, 1967

tortuous paths of parliamentary manners and mores. Under his guidance I have tried, as other members have tried, to understand the workings of parliamentary practice and procedures. I have observed the Clerk of the House in action at the table. As a result I have come to appreciate that a Clerk of the House of Commons must, in a sense, be a biblical paragon with the wisdom of Solomon, the patience of Job, the agility of David and the survival qualities of Jonah.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
LIB

Allan Joseph MacEachen (Minister of National Health and Welfare; Minister of Amateur Sport; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MacEachen:

The Parliamentary Companion of 100 years ago described the Clerk of the Commons House of Parliament as one who holds an office of great trust and importance. The Canadian parliament has been particularly gifted in its choice of clerks, and Mr. Raymond has followed in the tradition of such names as Bourinot and Beau-chesne. Perhaps, on this particular day, it would not be inappropriate for the Clerk to hear one last citation from Beauchesne, his favourite authority. I quote from Beau-chesne's Parliamentary Rules and Forms, fourth edition, 1958, as follows:

-a thousand.. . questions have to be solved by the Clerk who may be consulted at any time by the Speaker and the leader of the house. In the midst of a debate, questions of order of all descriptions may be raised and the Clerk must be ready to supply authorities for a decision-

During a crisis, when the government and the opposition are using all the strategy possible under the rules of the house, the leaders are in continuous consultation with the Clerk with respect to their motions and amendments. A wrong interpretation of the rules may then lead to the most dangerous miscalculations, and the Clerk has to be very sure of his ground when he thus advises the men whose political future must be decided on the floor of the house.

1 am sure Mr. Beauchesne was not simply attempting to justify his own status when he maintained that the Clerk's executive duties are absorbing and keep him busy the whole year round. He comments as follows:

If a member of the house loses his railway transportation card during the summer, as it sometimes happens, the Clerk has to issue another one under a new number and send out forty three notices to the railway companies.

In conclusion, I am sure the house would wish the retiring Clerk many years of pleasant contemplation and other restful pursuits in his well earned retirement. We hope, as well, that from time to time he will take advantage of his entree to this house so we may still benefit from his guidance and experience.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Tributes to Mr. Leon-J. Raymond,

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader; Whip of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I do not wish to multiply words, but as one who has enjoyed Mr. Raymond's friendship for the 22 years since he first entered parliament I wish to express my own appreciation of the tremendous contribution he has made to the House of Commons of Canada. The things that have been said by those who have already spoken have been said with deep sincerity, they have been said on behalf of all of us, and they are all true. Mr. Raymond has been a true friend to all members of the House of Commons. He has exercised his responsibilities with that care, integrity and impartiality that are so necessary to the important office that he has held for the past 18 years.

Not only has he been a friend to us all; not only has he worked diligently; we have known that his feeling for parliament has been like that of his distinguished predecessors. We are happy to associate his name with those of Bourinot and Beauchesne on this historic occasion.

[DOT] (11:30 a.m.)

I happen to remember Mr. Raymond's first speech as a member of the House of Commons. I remember it because I was following him in the debate that day, and I recall the thoughtfulness of his address to us on that occasion. I went to the library this morning to look it up again. My memory of it was correct; it was a thoughtful speech on the problems facing the world and on the various problems facing Canada, economic and social, as well as the need to build a united country on the basis of our two founding races.

Although it was made many years ago, the thoughts contained in this speech are still very timely. There is one paragraph in it which I should like to put on record again at this time. It is to be found at page 70 of Hansard for March 19, 1946, at which time the House of Commons was debating the address in reply to the speech from the throne. As I say, Mr. Raymond had dealt with various problems which were facing the world and facing Canada. He had built up quite a picture of the difficulties which had to be met. Then he said this:

The following statement may appear rather childish, Mr. Speaker, but I am convinced that all our problems can be solved provided we base their consideration on a spirit of mutual trust. However, this sentiment can only be awakened, nurtured and matured provided justice and charity govern the consideration of all these problems.

When Mr. Raymond uttered those words he had no notion, of course, that a few years

July 7. 1967

Tabling of Papers

later he would be the Clerk of the House of Commons. But I draw attention to the three characteristics he emphasized, mutual trust, justice and charity. These are the characteristics which have marked his regime as Clerk of the House of Commons and which have helped to make his services to us so helpful and so successful.

I join with others in expressing warm personal greetings to Mr. Raymond. I wish him health and happiness in the years ahead. It is perhaps unfortunate that his position does not enable him to say a few words from the floor of the House of Commons; he is probably glad he cannot. But may I add the wish that in the years of retirement ahead he will have time to write a book and enrich our knowledge of the practices of parliament.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT OF MR. LEON-J. RAYMOND AS CLERK
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


TRANSPORT

CHAMPLAIN WATERWAY-TABLING OF INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION REPORT

LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

I beg to table in French and in English copies of the report of the international joint commission on the improvement of the internal Champlain waterway for commercial navigation.

Topic:   TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   CHAMPLAIN WATERWAY-TABLING OF INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION REPORT
Permalink
LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Has the minister leave to table this document?

Topic:   TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   CHAMPLAIN WATERWAY-TABLING OF INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION REPORT
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   CHAMPLAIN WATERWAY-TABLING OF INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION REPORT
Permalink

July 7, 1967