April 25, 1967

THE LATE KONRAD ADENAUER

TRIBUTE ON PASSING OF FORMER GERMAN CHANCELLOR

LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. May I on behalf of all hon. members pay tribute at this time to a great statesman of modern Germany, former Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, whose memory was honoured today at a state funeral in Cologne cathedral attended by dignitaries of many nations and at which Canada was represented by the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Martin).

In many places throughout the world people will be paying homage today to a life long and rich in accomplishment. The right hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Pearson), on behalf of Canada, has already conveyed to Chancellor Kiesinger the assurance that we in Canada will remember Dr. Adenauer as a firm and resolute ally of the west who led his country to reconstruction and rebirth, as a friend who led Germany to membership in the Atlantic alliance and to a prominent place in the European movement. Today the constructive role that the Federal Republic of Germany plays in world affairs is the legacy that Dr. Adenauer has left this century in a few short years.

[DOT] (2:40 p.m.)

These are his accomplishments, and they will have earned him a special place in the history of our country. We extend our sympathy to our German friends at a time of national loss, and particularly to our parliamentary colleagues in the federal German Bundestag.

Topic:   THE LATE KONRAD ADENAUER
Subtopic:   TRIBUTE ON PASSING OF FORMER GERMAN CHANCELLOR
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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS

REQUEST FOR EARLY RESERVATIONS BY MEMBERS FOR EXPO VISIT

LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. J. W. Pickersgill (Minister of Transport):

Mr. Speaker, I believe it is understood that on Thursday it is proposed that the house shall not sit, that members of the House of Commons and the other place may go to the opening of Expo. I have been asked by the Canadian National Railways, because

of the difficulty of obtaining accommodation, to say that it would be appreciated if members and senators wishing to travel by rail to Montreal for the official opening of Expo would telephone the local reservations desk today and book their reservations. The C.N.R. will make every effort to provide a sufficient number of rail cars to meet the requirements of members, senators and their wives, but it will facilitate matters greatly if it is known in advance what is likely to be the number of members so travelling.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR EARLY RESERVATIONS BY MEMBERS FOR EXPO VISIT
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NATIONAL DEFENCE

CONSENT OF GOVERNOR GENERAL NOT REQUIRED BEFORE THIRD READING OF AMENDING LEGISLATION

LIB

Paul Theodore Hellyer (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. Paul Hellyer (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday at the conclusion of consideration of the committee stage of Bill C-243, to amend the National Defence Act and other acts in consequence thereof, the hon. member for Winnipeg South Centre raised a question as to whether this bill affects the prerogatives of the crown and therefore requires the consent of His Excellency the Governor General before it is given third reading in the House of Commons.

I referred this question to the law officers of the crown, and I have been advised that such consent is not required. The term "prerogative", according to Todd, "On Parliamentary Government in England", volume I, page 383, may be defined as expressing those political powers which are inherent in the crown and that have not been conferred by act of parliament, and which accordingly continue within the competency of the Sovereign except in so far as they have been modified or restrained by positive legislation.

The parliament of Canada has for many years legislated with respect to the organization and administration of the armed forces of Canada so that, in my view the crown's prerogative in this respect has "been modified or restrained by positive legislation" and therefore no longer exists in these areas, which are the areas affected by Bill C-243.

While the letters patent constituting the office of governor general provide that the Governor General is commander in chief of

April 25. 1967

Canada, Bill C-243 does not affect his position. Any responsibilities or prerogatives respecting the organization and management of the armed forces that may at one time have been in the commander in chief have, as I have said, been removed by successive acts of the parliament of Canada legislating on these matters.

As I said at the outset, Mr. Speaker, there is no requirement to obtain the consent of His Excellency the Governor General in respect to the introduction of this bill. May I say, however, that as a matter of courtesy His Excellency was apprised of the tenor of the biU.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   CONSENT OF GOVERNOR GENERAL NOT REQUIRED BEFORE THIRD READING OF AMENDING LEGISLATION
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TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS

SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEE

LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is it agreed that we return to the presenting of reports, that the hon. member for Hamilton West may present a committee report?

Topic:   TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Subtopic:   SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Subtopic:   SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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LIB

Joseph Angelo Macaluso

Liberal

Mr. Joseph Macaluso (Hamilton West):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have the honour to present the sixteenth and seventeenth reports of the standing committee on transport and communications, in English and French.

Topic:   TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Subtopic:   SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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REPORT ON FIRST MEETING OF ANGLO-CANADIAN MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE

LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Mitchell Sharp (Minister of Finance):

On Wednesday and Thursday of last week a Canadian delegation led by the under secretary of state for external affairs and including the Ministers of Trade and Commerce, Industry and Defence Production, Energy, Mines and Resources, Agriculture and myself, participated in the first meeting in London of the Anglo-Canadian ministerial committee on trade and economic affairs. In the absence of both the Secretary of State for External Affairs and the Minister of Trade and Commerce I should like, with the leave of the house, to table the official communique issued at the conclusion of the London meeting.

Topic:   REPORT ON FIRST MEETING OF ANGLO-CANADIAN MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Has the minister leave the table these documents?

Topic:   REPORT ON FIRST MEETING OF ANGLO-CANADIAN MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   REPORT ON FIRST MEETING OF ANGLO-CANADIAN MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE
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LIB

Mitchell William Sharp (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Sharp:

As hon. members will recall, the establishment of this Anglo-Canadian ministerial committee was agreed upon by the two

governments last year. While there are many occasions for British and Canadian ministers to meet, at Commonwealth gatherings at the United Nations and in a variety of other international bodies, it was felt that a joint ministerial committee could usefully supplement existing channels of communication and provide a most valuable means of consultation between the two governments. In this time of rapid change in Europe and the world at large it seemed to us that a committee of this kind with Britain, our second largest trading partner, would be especially useful and timely. As hon. members are aware, we have similar joint committees with the United States and with Japan.

Our experience has been that periodic ministerial meetings of this kind provide a unique opportunity for frank and intimate exchanges of views on a wide range of international and bilateral matters of common concern, and contribute to a better understanding of respective policies and problems.

I believe my colleagues on the delegation would agree that the new Anglo-Canadian ministerial committee got off to a good start, and that the very frank and cordial character of the discussion amply fulfilled our expectations. As indicated in the communique, British and Canadian ministers reviewed major current international issues including Viet Nam and the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons at the opening session at 10 Downing street under the chairmanship of Prime Minister Wilson. On that occasion there was also an exchange of views on the present situation with regard to Britain's possible approach to the European economic community and the important implications of this issue for Britain and Europe, for the world trading community as a whole and for trade between Canada and Britain. It was agreed that consultations on this subject would continue.

At its subsequent sessions in Marlborough House the committee discussed international and bilateral trade and economic matters including prospects for the economies of both countries; international liquidity; developments in the Kennedy round of trade and tariff negotiations including discussions of a multilateral cereals agreement; trade and aid for developing countries, including food aid, the prospects for a second United Nations conference on trade and development and development assistance in the Commonwealth, notably in the Caribbean area; and a variety of bilateral trade matters.

It was agreed that the committee would hold its second meeting in Canada at a date to be determined later.

April 25, 1967

Topic:   REPORT ON FIRST MEETING OF ANGLO-CANADIAN MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE
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IMMIGRATION ACT

April 25, 1967