April 21, 1966

BROADCASTING, FILMS AND ASSISTANCE TO THE ARTS MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE


Mr. Gerard Pelletier (Hochelaga) presented the first report of the standing committee on broadcasting, films and assistance to the arts. [Note.' Text of the foregoing report appears in today's Votes and Proceedings.]



He said: Mr. Speaker, with the consent of the house, I move, seconded by the member for Quebec-Montmorency (Mr. Laflamme), that the first report of the standing committee on broadcasting, films and assistance to the arts, presented this day, be now concurred in.


RA

David Réal Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Real Caouelle (Villeneuve):

In French and in English.

Topic:   BROADCASTING, FILMS AND ASSISTANCE TO THE ARTS MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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LIB

Ralph Bronson Cowan

Liberal

Mr. Ralph Cowan (York-Humber):

Mr. Speaker, I am not prepared to give unanimous consent.

Topic:   BROADCASTING, FILMS AND ASSISTANCE TO THE ARTS MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The hon. member for Hoche-lega probably knows that the unanimous consent of the house is required to move this motion. Since consent has not been given, the motion cannot be moved.

Topic:   BROADCASTING, FILMS AND ASSISTANCE TO THE ARTS MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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NDP

David Lewis

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Lewis (York South):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. With respect, I should like to ask whether it is possible for the Prime Minister or the house leader, one or both, to find some way of making it possible for the committee to meet, instead of allowing one intransigent member of this house to frustrate the will of the committee, of parliament and, indeed, of the people of Canada.

Topic:   BROADCASTING, FILMS AND ASSISTANCE TO THE ARTS MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order, please.

Topic:   BROADCASTING, FILMS AND ASSISTANCE TO THE ARTS MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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FINANCE

EXTENSION OF EXEMPTION UNDER U.S. SECURITIES LEGISLATION

LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members will recall that when I reported to the house on March 7 on the last meeting of the joint Canada-United States ministerial committee I drew attention to the discussion we had had on the proposed S.E.C. regulations applying to foreign securities traded over the counter in the United States.

I now wish to advise the house that the S.E.C. has announced that the exemption for foreign issuers from these regulations is being extended to November 30. Having regard to the time allowed for companies to register, this means that in effect no Canadian company would be affected before April of next year at the earliest. The government welcomes this announcement since it provides an opportunity for further discussion of the issues involved with interested authorities in Canada as a basis for working out a mutually satisfactory long term solution with the United States government.

Topic:   FINANCE
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF EXEMPTION UNDER U.S. SECURITIES LEGISLATION
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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Marcel Lambert (Edmonton West):

Mr. Speaker, my only comment on this announcement is that we will, of course, want to look into its implications. However, as in some of the other dealings the Canadian government has had with the United States government in regard to financial relations between the two countries, guide lines and what have you, there has usually been a quid pro quo. The minister has said nothing about whether Canada has had to make certain concessions in this regard, or whether this has been merely a straight extension. Canada having obtained certain concessions under the interest equalization act, we also know what sort of halter we put around our necks in order to do so.

Topic:   FINANCE
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF EXEMPTION UNDER U.S. SECURITIES LEGISLATION
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, we are glad to have the announcement just made by the Secretary of State for External Affairs. This promises a respite from the proposed changes under the S.E.C. regulations. I hope, however, that the government will exercise all possible measures and persuasion to have the United States

April 21, 1966

Labour Conditions

government agree that as of April next these S.E.C. regulations will be waived entirely; because I think they have caused a good deal of concern in Canada, and it would be most unjust if they were imposed next April.

[DOT] (2:40 p.m.)

Topic:   FINANCE
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF EXEMPTION UNDER U.S. SECURITIES LEGISLATION
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGE IN MANPOWER MOBILITY PROGRAM

LIB

Jean Marchand (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

Hon. Jean Marchand (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform the house of an important change in the manpower mobility program. In the program as instituted at the end of last year, a worker can receive a grant to help him to move only if he has been unemployed for four out of the previous six months. Otherwise he can get assistance but only as a loan. We wish to broaden the grant part of the program, but the house will appreciate that this can be done only carefully, as our administrative experience of this type of assistance increases, so that we do not incur abuses.

The step forward we have now taken affects areas where the shut-down of an enterprise, or a lay-off, is of such a size in relation to total employment in the area that unemployed workers have little chance of getting jobs except by moving. This situation is particularly likely to arise in remote areas, as when a mine closes. The regulations have therefore been amended to provide that the minister may designate such an area, and that unemployed people in the area will then be eligible for mobility grants without the qualification of having been unemployed for four months.

Under the terms of this new regulation I have today designated Bissett, Manitoba, as an area where, for the next 12 months, mobility grants will be available on the new terms. As you are aware, Mr. Speaker, the need for this assistance arises from the shutdown of San Antonio Gold Mines. I should add that in view of the recent announcement of the intended closing of the Wabana mine, I expect shortly to designate Bell Island, Newfoundland, for similar assistance. The problems of the people there may be particularly difficult, and my department is urgently examining, in collaboration with other departments, what special action we might take in conjunction with the designation of the area for mobility grants.

Mr. Robert Muir (Cape Breton North and

Victoria): Mr. Speaker, I am sure that we have all listened with great interest to the comments made by the minister with respect to the change in the regulations concerning grants and loans. In particular he mentioned the Wabana area in Bell Island, Newfoundland.

Certainly what has now been announced is a decided improvement over what existed previously. In the long run, however, I suggest that it would be much better for the government to do all it can to provide employment in the particular areas mentioned, and in other similar areas, rather than providing the Gordon one way tickets out of those areas. That remark has particular reference to the maritime provinces.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGE IN MANPOWER MOBILITY PROGRAM
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NDP

David Orlikow

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Orlikow (Winnipeg North):

I am

sure that members of all parties, and those in the organized labour movement who have called for an expansion of the manpower program, will greet the announcement the minister has made today with a great deal of satisfaction. It indicates at least a beginning of a change in the government's thinking. It seems to many of us and to people outside the house concerned with this that the government and the departments concerned until very recently felt that the manpower program, such as it was, was adequate. It was very obvious to everybody concerned that a good deal needed to be done.

We think this announcement shows a step in the right direction. However, Mr. Speaker, I hope the minister will shortly look at the recommendations of bodies such as the Economic Council which urge that the whole programs of loans be wiped out, and that this kind of problem be dealt with through grants. It is obviously unfair and impractical to expect people who for a long time have been unemployed to pay back money which has been advanced to them so they can move to a job where they can earn a living for themselves and their families. As a beginning, however, we welcome this.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGE IN MANPOWER MOBILITY PROGRAM
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RA

David Réal Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Real Caouette (Villeneuve):

Mr. Speaker, I have listened attentively to the statement of the minister of manpower (Mr. Marchand) to the effect that, for certain areas of Canada, the government is ready to intervene and grant loans to those who need them and to facilitate their mobility when required.

April 21, 1966

These measures are liable to be of assistance to certain areas such as those the minister mentioned. I should, however, like to call the minister's attention to other areas which he has not mentioned this afternoon, for instance the area of Val d'Or-Malartic, where gold mines are to close. Other mines are discontinuing their operations and we have to attend to moving such manpower as is no longer needed.

If the minister were to make a thorough study of the situation prevailing in our region, I think he would ask his colleagues to urge the government to help create new industries and develop new mines wherever this can be done, so as to keep our manpower in our region and avoid any relocation. This would not only prevent relocation of workers, but it would also prevent them from running into debt because, according to government policy, they would have to pay back, over the next five or ten years, the loans obtained.

I, therefore, draw the attention of the minister to this matter. I hope that he will examine it thoroughly and that new industries will be attracted to areas where workers are already established so that they may go on living there.

[DOT] (2:50 p.m.)

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGE IN MANPOWER MOBILITY PROGRAM
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IMMIGRATION

FARM LABOUR FROM JAMAICA FOR SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO

April 21, 1966