January 18, 1966

SC

Robert Norman Thompson

Social Credit

Mr. R. N. Thompson (Red Deer):

Mr. Raymond, it is with pleasure, on behalf of our party and myself personally, that I join with the leaders of the other opposition parties in giving wholehearted support to the nomination made by the right hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Pearson) and seconded by the President of the Privy Council (Mr. Favreau).

Those of us who watched Mr. Lamoureux during the last parliament, particularly as Deputy Speaker, I think are virtually in

unanimous agreement that he performed his work well. I believe that it is logical that he should now be named Speaker of this twenty seventh parliament. Perhaps the twenty sixth parliament will be known as the parliament which, under the leadership of the former Speaker, Mr. Macnaughton, brought in the revised rules and procedures. We are grateful for the work that Mr. Macnaughton carried on and to which he gave leadership.

I believe this parliament will have as its responsibility the implementation and refining of those rules. Because of this there is a particular responsibility upon Mr. Lamoureux. His experience and his familiarity with these new rules and procedures I think make it reasonable that he should be the one to chair this chamber during this parliament.

I believe that further remarks are redundant as far as the importance of maintaining the authority and the rights of the Speaker as they relate to the preservation of our parliamentary procedure. We want you, Mr. Raymond, to know that we give our support to Mr. Lamoureux, that we will co-operate with him and that we will share, so far as it is possible, that responsibility of making sure this parliament functions effectively and well.

[DOT] (11:50 a.m.)

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Marcel Lambert (Edmonton West):

Mr. Raymond, although compliments have been addressed to Mr. Lamoureux to the extent where it proved embarrassing for him, and in spite of my own desire not to prolong these proceedings unduly, it still behooves me to say a few words as the only member in the house at the present time in the unique position of having held the post of Speaker and later become a member of the Opposition.

We all know what qualities are required of the Speaker. I shall not give that list for in so doing, I should probably be repeating what was said about me in 1962, which I found most embarrassing at that time.

Now, Mr. Raymond, I do not wish to prolong these proceedings. We have heard today, and very many of us have heard on similar occasions in the past, the qualifications and requirements for that most privileged post, the Speakership of this House. It is not a mere passive role; it is a most challenging role. I know that many people share my opinion that the Speaker of the House is not merely a gatekeeper; he is an active officer of this House. It is true that he is the servant of this House,

January 18, 19G6

but he is the servant of no one man; -therefore he must maintain impartiality and fairness as between one member and another from the front bench to the back bench, subject to human frailties.

I might conclude by referring to a speech made on the occasion of the election of a Speaker by the House of Representatives of one of our sister countries of the commonwealth. As we know, one of the most difficult questions to decide is the matter of parliamentary and unparliamentary language and the retraction of certain remarks. Unfortunately in some parliaments the language is more frank or, perhaps, more brutal than it is in this house, and the occasions for expulsion are much more numerous. On this particular occasion it was said of the nominee for the position that he was extremely well qualified to decide on the nature of parliamentary and non-parliamentary language, as well as on the expulsion of members, since he had himself been expelled three or four times.

While Mr. Lamoureux has not had that experience and, happily, this House conducts itself on a more restrained plane, I think he will readily understand the point I am trying to make. He has gained experience as Deputy Speaker under the tutelage of Mr. Speaker Macnaughton-and one must not, of course, forget the wise counsel of the Clerk of the House and of the staff-and I am sure we can look forward to a very fruitful session under the-I hope-steady hand of the Speaker nominee.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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IND

Maurice Allard

Independent Progressive Conservative

Mr. Maurice Allard (Sherbrooke):

Mr. Raymond, I have just consulted my independent colleague, the hon. member for Trois-Rivieres (Mr. Mongrain) and, even though we have both been seated close to the main exit, we have agreed to sit a long time in the house. To this end we rely on the qualities enumerated by the President of the Privy Council (Mr. Favreau) with regard to the Speakership, that is fair-mindedness and objectivity.

We are therefore delighted to state even at this early date that we trust the sense of fairness, impartiality and objectivity of the new Speaker. We pay our respects to him and extend our best wishes for his success and good health. Good luck.

The Clerk of the House declared the motion carried in the affirmative, nemine contra-dicente, and Lucien Lamoureux Esquire, member for the electoral district of Stormont, duly elected to the chair of the house.

Election of Speaker

Mr. Lamoureux was conducted from his seat in the house to the Speaker's chair by Right Hon. L. B. Pearson and Hon. Guy Favreau.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Hon. members of the house, from the bottom of my heart and in all modesty, I wish to thank you for the honour you have just bestowed upon me by electing me Speaker of the House.

It is with the best of feelings toward each one of you that I assume this heavy task. I can assure you right now that I shall discharge the responsibilities you have given me to the best of my ability. Among other duties, it is up to the Speaker to see that the standing orders and the rights and privileges of the hon. members and of Parliament are respected.

The degree of success I shall be able to achieve in carrying out that function will depend largely on the co-operation and assistance that the members shall give to the Speaker of the House. Trusting that such co-operation shall be given to me generously, I accept, in all modesty and gratitude, to act as Speaker of this house.

I pray Divine Providence to give me the courage, the strength and the wisdom I shall need to justify the confidence you are putting in me at this time.

Hon. Members of the House of Commons, I beg to return my humble acknowledgements for the great honour you have been pleased to confer upon me at this time as your Speaker.

I am grateful to the right hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Pearson) for the gracious words in which he proposed my nomination, and, of course, to the right hon. Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Diefenbaker) for the generous way in which he endorsed the nomination. I am equally grateful to the hon. member for Burnaby-Coquitlam (Mr. Douglas), to the hon. member for Red Deer (Mr. Thompson), to my colleague the hon. member for Villeneuve (Mr. Caouette),

. . . and also, naturally, to the President of the Privy Council (Mr. Favreau), who was kind enough to second the motion of the right, hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Pearson) and who did so in such a charming way.

January 18, 1966

Election of Speaker

My special thanks also-for we must always be mindful of the minorities in this House- to the hon. member for Sherbrooke (Mr. Allard) for the words he used in supporting my appointment.

[DOT] (12:00 noon)

May I at this time pay a well-earned tribute to one who, during the last parliament, served this house with great dignity and efficiency; to one who has earned our respect, our gratitude and our affection, Hon. Alan Macnaughton. Those who had the privilege to sit in the last parliament will know that Mr. Speaker Macnaughton was devoted, courteous and helpful to all members at all times. It will be my aim to emulate the high standard of integrity, impartiality and dedicated service which he and his predecessors, and in particular our distinguished colleague the hon. member for Edmonton West (Mr. Lambert), established during their tenure of office.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

On your behalf, hon. members, I wish to pay tribute also to the senior officers of the House of Commons. It is reassuring to the Chair and, I am sure to all hon. members, that we may rely on the continued efficient assistance and, in many instances, the wise counsel of these most competent advisers.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Again I humbly thank the house for the great trust it has placed in my hands and I can tell you, hon. members, it is my fervent hope that my limitations-and they are obvious limitations-for this high office will be alleviated in some measure by the diligence with which I propose to serve the House of Commons.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

Mr. Speaker, may I be permitted to congratulate you on your selection as the choice of all hon. members of the house to be our Speaker, and may I join you-and on this occasion perhaps I can speak on behalf of all hon. members-in the well deserved tribute you have paid to your predecessor.

When you consented to take the Chair, Mr. Speaker, you showed your reluctance to accept such difficult responsibilities, but perhaps not as much reluctance or as much opposition to your assignment as your predecessor might have shown if he had been

asked to take on the work for another parliament. But we know, Mr. Speaker, that you will discharge those heavy and historic responsibilities with scrupulous fairness and impartiality.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER
Subtopic:   MR. LUCIEN LAMOUREUX, MEMBER FOR THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF STORMONT
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SITTING SUSPENDED

LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. B. Pearson (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, may I suggest that this sitting of the house be suspended until three o'clock this afternoon.

Topic:   SITTING SUSPENDED
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The house has heard the suggestion of the Prime Minister that this sitting be suspended until three o'clock this day. Is it the pleasure of the house to adopt this suggestion?

Topic:   SITTING SUSPENDED
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   SITTING SUSPENDED
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LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I declare the sitting suspended until the ringing of the bells at 3 p.m. this day.

At 12.05 p.m. the sitting was suspended until 3 p.m. this day.

[DOT] (3:00 p.m.)

Topic:   SITTING SUSPENDED
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SITTING RESUMED


The house resumed at three o'clock. [DOT] (3:10 p.m.)


OPENING OF THE SESSION


Mr. Speaker read a communication from the Governor General's secretary announcing that His Excellency the Governor General would proceed to the Senate chamber at three o'clock on this day, for the purpose of formally opening the session of the dominion parliament. [DOT] (3:20 p.m.) A message was delivered by Major C. R. Lamoureux, Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, as follows: Mr. Speaker, it is the pleasure of His Excellency the Governor General that this honourable house attend him immediately in the chamber of the honourable the Senate. Accordingly, Mr. Speaker with the house went up to the Senate chamber. Then Hon. Lucien Lamoureux, Speaker of the House of Commons, said: May it please Your Excellency, The House of Commons have elected me their Speaker, though I am but little able to fulfil the important duties thus assigned to me. If in the performance of those duties I should at any time fall into error, I pray that the fault may be imputed to me, and not to the Commons, whose servant I am, and who, through me, the better to enable them to discharge their duty to their Queen and country, humbly claim all their undoubted rights and privileges, especially that January 18, 1966



they may have freedom of speech in their debates, access to Your Excellency's person at all seasonable times, and that their proceedings may receive from Your Excellency the most favourable construction. The Honourable the Speaker of the Senate, addressing the Honourable the Speaker of the House of Commons, then said: Mr. Speaker, I am commanded by His Excellency the Governor General to declare to you that he freely confides in the duty and attachment of the House of Commons to Her Majesty's person and government, and not doubting that their proceedings will be conducted with wisdom, temper and prudence, he grants and upon all occasions will recognize and allow their constitutional privileges. I am commanded also to assure you that the Commons shall have ready access to His Excellency upon all seasonable occasions, and that their proceedings as well as your words and actions, will constantly receive from him the most favourable construction. [DOT] (4:20 p.m.) Then His Excellency the Governor General was pleased to open parliament by a speech from the throne. And the house being returned to the Commons chamber:


LIB

Lucien Lamoureux (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to report that, the house having attended on His Excellency the Governor General in the Senate chamber, I informed His Excellency that the choice of Speaker had fallen upon me, and, in your names, and on your behalf, I made the usual claim for your privileges, which His Excellency was pleased to confirm to you.

Topic:   OPENING OF THE SESSION
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January 18, 1966