May 14, 1965

LIB

Hubert Badanai (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Badanai:

My information is quite correct. The statement referred to by the hon. Member was to the effect that a design had been produced. Notwithstanding that fact, a competition is being held among all the students for the production of a suitable label.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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NDP

Frank Howard

New Democratic Party

Mr. Howard:

The Department must be working on Indian time.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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PC

Fred Frise Stenson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fred F. Stenson (Peterborough):

should like to speak on this bill for a few minutes. First, I want to congratulate the hon. Member for Skeena (Mr. Howard) on the presentation of the bill and on the work he has put into it. I have in my constituency a reserve which has been doing a tremendous amount of craft work. In the last few years welfare payments have been cut out completely because of the revenue deriving from this craft work.

There is one important thing I should like to mention in connection with Indian and Eskimo crafts. We need markets for them. What better market could we find than our world fair in Montreal in 1967. I should like to ask the Government departments concerned, especially the Indian Affairs branch, the Department of Northern Affairs and the Department of Trade and Commerce, what preparations they are making toward the objective I have just mentioned. Are they plan-

Indian Affairs

ning to set up craft shops at the fair-shops of which our Eskimos, our Indians and, indeed, Canadians as a whole will be proud? We do not want craft shops set up to sell goods made by machines in Japan or some other country. I think the hon. Member for Skeena mentioned this a few moments ago. We want shops to display hand-made articles made through the crafts of our Canadian Indians and Eskimos. I suggest that the Department of Trade and Commerce should set aside money with which to buy this craft work which is being done by our people at the present time. The people of my reserve are looking for markets for their goods and they do not have sufficient money to stock them for future sales. I am sure there will be a splendid opportunity to sell these goods at the fair, because everybody who comes to Canada in 1967 will be looking for something which has been made by Indians or Eskimos. The Government should not wait, as it has done on other occasions, before initiating such a project. We should begin today. We must help our Indian and Eskimo people, and how better could we do so than by promoting the sale of these goods, so as to help make them independent? I feel the Government should take steps immediately to enable these people to go ahead with their crafts, to produce articles we shall all be proud of when our visitors come here-hand-made articles we shall be able to sell to them with pride.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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LIB

Albert Béchard

Liberal

Mr. Albert Bechard (Bonaveniure):

Mr. Speaker, before dealing with the bill under discussion, I should like to congratulate the sponsor of the bill, the hon. member for Skeena (Mr. Howard), on the interest he has always shown for this class of citizens who were the first to inhabit our country.

It is all the more pleasant for me to make my humble contribution to this debate, because there are in my riding two Indian reserves which have been in Bonaventure from the earliest days. Those reserves are located at Maria and Restigouche, along the Bay of Chaleur. At those two places, but especially at Maria, the Micmac Indians specialize in the manufacture of baskets with a skill unsurpassed in Canada and even abroad. Indeed, the baskets made by the Micmacs at the Maria Indian reservation are in great demand among the tourists who visit our area and they are increasingly popular both in Canada and abroad.

That Micmac industry has developed considerably in the past ten years, under the

May 14, 1965

Indian Affairs

impetus of a devoted missionary who understands those people and their aspirations and who, so to speak, has become integrated with them, Rev. Roland Provost. To provide those Indians with a livelihood and to develop within these people a pride for their culture and their art, Father Provost did not hesitate not only to become a publicity agent for that Indian handicraft but also to go from door to door, in Montreal and in several American cities, to sell to the public the work of those worthy fellow citizens, the Indians of the riding of Bonaventure.

The work done by Father Provost to promote Indian art among his flock, while his ultimate purpose was to stimulate the pride of this important part of our fellow citizens so that they could participate through their culture, their talents and their ingenuity in the greatness and development of our country, deserves to be mentioned today. In gratitude, I should like to pay a public tribute to him for the grand job he has been doing during all the years he spent teaching the Indians of the Maria reserve. This Indian industry, at the Maria reserve, is developing all the time.

When Father Provost left, the Indian Affairs Branch organized the basket-making craft on a co-operative basis and it is doing very well. The same thing could be developed in the other reserve, at Restigouche, which, after all, was the first one established and is more important, because it is the oldest one, has more people and is better located geographically, if the Canadian government paid special attention to that art. With the talents displayed every day by our Indian fellow citizens, there is no reason to underestimate their initiative, for all they need is a helping hand to promote this industry which would be enhancing Canadian art and culture.

I take the opportunity afforded me by this debate to suggest that the government should intensify its relations with the Indian communities of the country, particularly in that part of the province of Quebec, in order to assist Indians anxious to participate in the Canadian economy, through substantial financial assistance, so that such an industry may be established where Indians of our reserves could develop and benefit by their many talents which, up to now, in many cases, has remained latent.

According to the explanatory notes, the purpose of this Bill No. C-4 is to preserve and promote native Indian and Eskimo arts and crafts by the establishment of a native cultural council of Canada.

It would work in co-operation with UNESCO. One of the main provisions of this bill is to prohibit the importation into Canada of anything capable of passing as native Indian or Eskimo craftwork except under a certificate from the proposed council.

The government approves of course the main object of this bill. However, the protection of native arts and crafts is not so easily resolved as the hon. member for Skeena seems to think. Before endorsing any measure of this kind, the government wishes to study thoroughly all its possible aspects. As a matter of fact, the Indian Affairs Branch, last year made a serious study of this matter, in co-operation with the Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources and the Department of External Affairs. These studies are being continued and are conducted for the purpose of getting acquainted with the proper legislation and other means used in other countries for the protection of native art, in order to be in a better position to recommend an efficient legislation for Canada.

In the meantime, the government has engaged actively in means of promoting native art in various ways, including a close cooperation with the World Craft Council set up recently and whose charter was so worded as to become an instrument for UNESCO in the promotion of native arts and crafts. It is also important to emphasize the close co-operation of the government with the Canadian Handicraft Guild concerning organized competition of the best piece of Indian handicraft and the publishing of a booklet fostering these competitions.

I may recall also this government's initiative for the adoption of a distinctive label for the protection of Indian crafts.

A competition has been opened among Indian students throughout the country for the best design. Prizes shall be awarded to contestants submitting the best drawings and a grand prize given for the drawing selected to protect Indian art produced and sold in this country and abroad.

Besides the efforts shown until now and the work in progress already referred to, the Department of Indian Affairs is laying plans for an extensive five-year program for the development of Indian art and handicraft. Although the details of the program have not been completed yet, its main purpose will be to encourage and develop talent and creativeness in the field of Indian art to the fullest extent possible. To achieve this goal, the government will assist, financially and

May 14, 1965

otherwise, Indian undertakings and industries at all stages, from the production to the marketing of their products. Thus, the craftsmen themselves, the Indians and the Eskimos, will be able, having not only the talent but the equipment, the advertising and the market, to get along on their own and to earn a living to support their families. Our Indians do not want to live off society or public handouts. Their great desire is to take part in their country's economic expansion. We must therefore give them the opportunity to make themselves known and to identify definitely with their compatriots, and to create for them, their arts and cultures a favourable climate. The Indians do not want anything more than to be considered Canadian citizens in the full sense of the word.

The present government has already taken important steps in that direction and the prospects are encouraging.

[DOT] (5:40 p.m.)

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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SC

Alexander Bell Patterson

Social Credit

Mr. A. B. Patterson (Fraser Valley):

Mr. Speaker, I want to take this opportunity of speaking briefly in support of the principle of Bill No. C-4 that has been introduced for discussion at this time. I notice in the explanatory note that the purpose of the Bill is "to preserve and promote native Indian and Eskimo arts and crafts by the establishment of a Native Cultural Council of Canada". In stating my support I refer particularly to the first part, which is "to preserve and promote native Indian and Eskimo arts and crafts". The technique by which this is to be accomplished is open for discussion. Whether the suggestions made by the hon. Member for Skeena (Mr. Howard) should be followed in their entirety, I am not quite sure; but I do recognize the value and importance of the objective which he seeks to realize through this particular bill.

I believe there is a gradually increasing awareness of the Indian and the Eskimo, as integral components in the Canadian picture. When we discuss this matter with various peoples and groups across the country, they refer to the fact that there is a growing awareness in their own communities of the importance of giving consideration to the place that the Indian and Eskimo peoples have in our national life, and they are desirous of making whatever contribution may be possible to enhance the position that these people have in our economy.

[DOT] (5:50 p.m.)

We have had a great deal of discussion in this House with regard to the needs of these 22620-86

Indian Affairs

native peoples. There have been extended discussions about the problems of education, housing, employment, health, traditional rights and so on. We recognize and have emphasized the necessity for doing everything possible to assist our native peoples in raising their standing of living and in making a more adequate contribution to our society. I believe that this is necessary, and it is well. But I also believe that there must be a recognition of the contribution which the Indian and Eskimo peoples can make to Canadian development, if they are only given the chance and the opportunity.

We think of the entrance, for example, of some of the native peoples into the social and economic life of Canada, and this is appreciated by them. We find that where they have the opportunity they are capable of making a very worth-while contribution to the Canadian scene. We also recognize that the maintenance of the culture of these people is very necessary and essential. Within the past few weeks, I have had the opportunity of attending a convention of Indian peoples which was held in my own constituency. I discussed with them some of their problems and aspirations, and remember quite well the pride with which they spoke of their culture, their language, their arts and crafts and their desire that everybody should recognize these valuable assets and give what assistance could be given in their maintenance and development.

My appreciation of Indian arts and crafts goes back quite a few years, when just as a small chap I was employed in a store where we dealt to a considerable extent with the Indian peoples of the community. They brought in their products. They brought in the various goods which they had manufactured, and 1 remember how we used to look upon them as very interesting and really worth-while objects. So I have had a real appreciation for Indian crafts down through the years.

The bill which has been introduced is especially designed to promote and maintain Indian arts and crafts-a field of tremendous possibilities. Reference has been made to them in various documents, and I have one here with respect to economic development among the Eskimo people, a document put out by the Information Services Division of the Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources. It contrasts this aspect with some other aspects of development and says:

The handicraft instructor on the other hand has quite a different role to play. His job is not so

Mar 14. 1965

Indian Affairs

much to teach, but to draw out the skills and creative abilities of the people, and to channel these into the production of crafts which have a market.

I indicated, Mr. Speaker, that I was going to speak only briefly in support of this measure, but we have had brought to our attention the possibilities in this particular field. We have also had pointed out by various speakers some of the obstacles which the Indian and Eskimo people are facing in the marketing of their particular articles of arts and crafts. I believe it is essential that the Federal Government, the administration, give every encouragement in this particular field. The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration (Mr. Badanai) has indicated some of the projects which are being put forth, and I believe they ought to be expanded.

In connection with other goods, imitations which are placed on sale, I believe every safeguard must be established so as to make sure that authentic Indian and Eskimo products receive their proper recognition and that people know when buying these goods by whom they were produced, and whether or not they are authentic. I do not know whether it is advisable to set up a council such as that proposed, with the authority to forbid the importation of such goods, unless by their approval. I do not know whether that is wise; but I do believe that every safeguard must be given this particular industry. It is also essential that the Indian and Eskimo people have the co-operation of the authorities and everyone else who can lend a hand in the establishment of marketing outlets for their particular arts and crafts.

Mr. Speaker, I do not want to be charged with talking this bill out; I just want to support the general principle involved in this particular measure.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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LIB

Ian Watson

Liberal

Mr. Ian Watson (Chaleauguay-Huniingdon-Laprairie):

Mr. Speaker, there are several very good qualities about the bill proposed today by the hon. Member for Skeena (Mr. Howard). One is his insistence that on the proposed council there be Indian and Eskimo membership. This is an idea which I think has to be stressed and restressed with the Indian Affairs branch. Because if in Canada

we are going to create a feeling of participation in our Canadian life among our Indian and Eskimo people, there must be more participation by them in our Government services and within any organization having to do with their lives.

I think the most important thing the Federal Government can do now to stimulate and protect Indian culture is to strengthen the Indian culture which exists at the local level, at the reserve level, by strengthening the reserves themselves and by strengthening local groups of Indians. The economic aspects of Indian arts and crafts are important, but I think by stimulating these arts and crafts an even more important result will be the creation of local pride, and pride in Indian and Eskimo identity. This pride is essential if our Indian and Eskimo people are going to play a full role in Canadian life.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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PC

Eric Alfred Winkler (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Winkler:

Six o'clock.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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PC

Lawrence E. Watson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Watson (Chafeauguay-Huniingdon-La-prairie):

May I call it six o'clock.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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LIB

Herman Maxwell Batten (Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole)

Liberal

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Batten):

Order. The hour for consideration of private Members' business has expired.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ARTS AND CRAFTS-ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE CULTURAL COUNCIL
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

SC

Horace Andrew (Bud) Olson

Social Credit

Mr. Olson:

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the Acting House Leader what is the business for Monday, and perhaps he can tell us what else is expected for next week?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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PC

Eric Alfred Winkler (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Winkler:

We will allow the hon. Member that privilege today.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Permalink
LIB

John Watson MacNaught (Minister Without Portfolio; Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. MacNaught:

Thank you. The first item of business on Monday will be third reading of Bill No. C-104, to amend the National Housing Act. Then we will resume the debate on second reading of an Act to make provision for the Retirement of Members of the Senate. Then we will take item No. 10 on today's Order Paper in the name of the Minister of Justice, a resolution concerning the setting up of a joint committee of the Senate and House of Commons to consider the state of penitentiaries under the control of the Government.

At six o'clock the House adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order.

May 14. 1965

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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APPENDIX

COMMUNIQUE FOLLOWING MEETING OF NATO MINISTERIAL COUNCIL


The North Atlantic Council held its Spring Ministerial Meeting in London on 11th and 12th May, 1965. 2. In a comprehensive survey of the international scene, Ministers noted that so far as Europe was concerned, the situation was basically unchanged. There had been no major crisis or confrontation, and the trend toward increased contacts between East and West had continued. 3. Nevertheless, the fundamental causes of tension still persist, and little if any progress has been made toward removing them. Germany is still divided, and recent interferences with freedom of communication with Berlin have once again shown the dangers of this situation. In these circumstances, the Council associated itself with the Declaration issued by the Governments of France, the United Kingdom and the United States of America on 12th May, 1965 (which is attached as an Annex to this Communique). At the same time, the Council confirmed the terms of its Declaration of 16th December, 1958, with regard to Berlin. 4. Member states are determined to work together, in accordance with the fundamental principles of the Alliance, for peace, freedom and the rule of law. They remain ready to seize any opportunity for achieving progressively a genuine improvement in relations with the Soviet Union and the countries of Eastern Europe. Ministers agreed on the continuing necessity within the Alliance of exchanging information and views to the greatest extent possible, and of maintaining the maximum degree of harmonisation in the policies pursued by member countries. 5. Ministers welcomed the continuing progress in political consultation within the Alliance. They observed with satisfaction that the practice had become more frequent of Ministers and high officials from capitals attending regular meetings of the Council in Permanent Session for discussion of subjects of special interest. They also noted that the Council in Permanent Session had embarked on the study of the state of the Alliance which it had been directed, at the last Ministerial meeting, to undertake. They instructed the Permanent Representatives to continue the 22620-86 i examination of this question with a view to submitting to Ministers suggestions which could be discussed, if appropriate, at the December Ministerial meeting. 6. The Ministers reviewed comprehensively the international situation with particular attention to areas of tension or conflict such as Malaysia, Vietnam, the Dominican Republic and some African States, where grave threats have arisen to international security and peace. They reaffirmed the right of all peoples to live at peace under governments of their own free choice. 7. With regard to Greek-Turkish relations, Ministers took note of the Secretary General's report on the "Watching brief" which he continues to hold in conformity with the decision taken by Ministers at The Hague meeting. In the course of the Ministerial meeting, contacts took place between the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of Greece and Turkey. Taking note of this, the Council expressed its satisfaction and its desire that these contacts should continue in a constructive spirit with a view to normalising relations between these two member countries and promoting an improvement in the situation in Cyprus by assisting the efforts of the United Nations Force in Cyprus. It also expressed the hope that the search for an agreed and equitable solution of the Cyprus problem, in conformity with the relevant resolution of the United Nations Security Council, would thus be facilitated. 8. The hope was expressed that, without prejudging the legal and political position of any member country, an early solution would be found to the difficulties facing the United Nations, in order that the world organization might be enabled to play its proper role in helping to preserve international peace and security. 9. Ministers reaffirmed their interest in the stability and the economic and social welfare of the developing countries. 10. Ministers expressed their regret that so little progress had been made toward disarmament. For their part, they will continue to press for active negotiations to achieve measures of disarmament under ef-



May 14, 1965 fective international control. They also emphasised the importance they attach to preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons. 11. So long as the threat of aggression, direct or indirect, persists, the prime task of the Atlantic Alliance will be to maintain a defensive posture adequate to deter attack and meet it effectively should the need arise. The Council expressed the hope that the meeting of Defence Ministers to be held in Paris on 31st May and 1st June would lead to further progress in elucidating the complex and inter-related problems of strategy, force requirements, and resources. 12. A meeting of the Council at Ministerial level will be held in Paris in December 1965. Annex


THREE-POWER DECLARATION ON GERMANY


The Governments of the Republic of France, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, together with the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, have recently undertaken a further examination of the German problem and of the prospects for a resumption of discussions on this subject with the Government of the Soviet Union. The three Governments have taken this action by virtue of the obligations and responsibilities concerning Germany, including Berlin and access thereto, devolving upon them since the end of the second world war and which they share with the Government of the Soviet Union. Further study will be given to the possibility of an approach to the Soviet Government on this subject, with due regard to the prospect of such an approach leading to useful results. The three Governments consider that in the absence of a real solution of the German problem, based on the exercise in the two parts of Germany of the right of selfdetermination, the situation in Europe as a whole will remain unsettled and that in consequence peace will not be fully assured on that continent. This solution is necessary not only in the interest of the German people, which asks for its reunification, but in the interest of all European peoples as well as other peoples concerned. It is evident that the necessary settlement can only be achieved by peaceful means and in circumstances involving a general agreement assuring the security of all European states. The three Governments are convinced that the Government of the Federal Republic, which has solemnly renounced the use of force, is in agreement with them on these points. They reaffirm their belief that, in the interests of the peace of Europe and of the world, the necessary decisions cannot be indefinitely postponed.



Monday, May 17, 1965


May 14, 1965