April 2, 1965

PROCEDURE

CONCURRENCE IN SEVENTEENTH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE

PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Official Opposition House Leader; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Gordon Churchill (for Mr. Lambert) moved

that the seventeenth report of the special committee on procedure and organization, presented to this house on March 26, 1965 be now concurred in.

Topic:   PROCEDURE
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN SEVENTEENTH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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Motion agreed to.


CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE

PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Marcel Lambert (Edmonton West) moved

that the twentieth report of the special committee on procedure and organization, presented to this house on March 26, 1965, be now concurred in.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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Motion agreed to.


EXTERNAL AFFAIRS


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Leader of the Opposition):

In connection with Viet Nam and the desirability of having a conference of the Geneva powers, is the Secretary of State for External Affairs in a position to advise the house if it is a fact that the British government has sent a message to the Geneva powers asking for their views as to the conditions which should be laid down as a basis for the convening of a conference, and what will Canada's views be in that connection? I have another question that no doubt will be supplementary to the answer.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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Hon. Paul Marlin@Secretary of Stale for External Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I have received, only a short time ago, a note from the British foreign secretary, on behalf of his government, one of the co-chairmen of the Geneva powers, asking Canada, as a member of the international control and supervisory commission, along with its two colleague

states and the original members of the Geneva conference, for a statement as to the views of the government with regard to what conditions we believe should be considered precedent to the calling of a conference on Viet Nam.

I just received the note a short time before coming into the house, and I would not want to give a precise reply until I have had a full opportunity of considering the matter. But I would like to say, without anticipating the details of the reply the government will make, that our views have been stated, beginning with those expressed by the Prime Minister on February 10 when he said the government was of the view that there should be a cease fire on all sides. As I have repeatedly said, we think that military means are not enough to bring about a solution, and that a conference is necessary.

However, I have had to point out that before a conference could be held there would have to be a disposition for this on all sides, and there is no evidence at the moment of any agreement or disposition on the part of North Viet Nam to the holding of such conference.

Perhaps at this juncture I might just throw out what I suggested a week ago, that if there is no agreement with regard to the holding of a conference on Viet Nam, the time may have arrived when we could give consideration to a conference on the problems facing Laos. The members of that conference would be the same member states that would attend a conference on Viet Nam. It might be that the holding of such a conference would afford an opportunity for considering the matter involved in my right hon. friend's question.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Might I ask the Secretary of State for External Affairs-and I base this question on the summary of the message from the British government for the convening of the convention-is it not a fact that the government of the United Kingdom, a socialist government, takes the unequivocal stand as a government, that the United States is justified in carrying on its policies in South Viet Nam, and carrying them on so long as North Viet Nam continues its aggression?

Inquiries of the Ministry

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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Mr. Marlin@Essex East

I think it is clear from statements made by the British prime minister that what the right hon. gentleman has said is a correct interpretation of stated policy of Her Majesty's government in the United Kingdom.

May I just add one more observation to my answer to the right hon. gentleman's first question. The suggestion of a conference on Laos was put forward by the British government and reaffirmed by the former British foreign secretary, who is being sent to Viet Nam by the British government.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Is the suggestion of calling a conference on Laos simply a means whereby these various nations can be brought together, with the opportunity of discussing the Viet Nam problem, where it is expected that would be one of the subjects discussed?

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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Mr. Marlin@Essex Easl

There are very serious problems involved in the Laotian situation, and there have been suggestions made that the time is at hand when some of those problems might be faced and possibly resolved by a meeting. There has been no opportunity for direct contact by most of the Geneva powers with Hanoi, and as the North Vietnamese government would in all probability attend a conference on the Laotian problem, this might afford a contact which is not now available.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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NDP

Francis Andrew Brewin

New Democratic Party

Mr. Andrew Brewin (Greenwood):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the Secretary of State for External Affairs to deal with the appeal of Yugoslavia and other non-aligned nations to which he referred yesterday. At that time he said he had not the opportunity to study the text of the appeal in detail. I should like to ask him whether, having now read the text, he approves the appeal of these nations for immediate negotiations without preconditions and, if he does approve, whether the government of Canada has communicated that approval unequivocally to the government of the United States and to other interested governments.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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Mr. Marlin@Essex Easl

I cannot add anything at this time to what I said yesterday. I indicated yesterday that on first reading I could not approve of all that was involved in the appeal, but that much of the appeal did commend itself to the government of Canada and seemed to be consistent with previous declarations of Canadian foreign policy. Beyond that I cannot go at this moment.

(Mr. Diefenbaker.]

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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SC

Robert Norman Thompson

Social Credit

Mr. R. N. Thompson (Red Deer):

Can the

hon. minister tell us whether he has been contacted by the government of the United States or by the secretary general of the United Nations with regard to the proposal that the secretary general should proceed on a peace making mission of his own to North Viet Nam, South Viet Nam or red China, as is reported this morning?

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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Mr. Marlin@Essex Easl

It would be expected that a country such as Canada, loyal to the charter of the UN, would be anxious to see the secretary general use his good offices for the purpose of bringing peace to Viet Nam. Anything the secretary general could do in this context would of course receive the strong support of the government of Canada. I might say that when the Prime Minister conferred with the secretary general some time ago he gave the secretary general the fullest encouragement to use his office for this purpose.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN TWENTIETH REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   VIET NAM-U.K. MESSAGE RESPECTING RECONVENING OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
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April 2, 1965