July 30, 1964

SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL

TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT FROM BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS

LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. B. Pearson (Prime Minister):

Recently the right hon. gentleman the member for Woodford, Sir Winston Churchill, announced his retirement from the British House of Commons. As the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom said at Westminster this week, this is an occasion both of sadness and of grandeur; sadness, because the greatest parliamentary career of our time is coming to an end; grandeur, because of the honour and lustre which that career has brought to the institution of parliament.

Mr. Speaker, I am sure all members of this house would wish to put on record the unbounded admiration and gratitude of the Canadian House of Commons for Sir Winston's services to freedom and to free men everywhere. We shall remain forever in his debt for the inspiration and the achievements of his life and his work; above all for his leadership in the struggle against what he once described as "the foulest and most soul destroying tyranny which had ever darkened and stained the pages of history."

The sweep of Sir Winston's career across our history is still so close to us that we can only view with awe the part he has played in this turbulent twentieth century. We are so close to him that it is difficult to pay adequate tribute to, or even to keep in any proper perspective, one who always matched, and often dominated, the events of his age.

He is the heroic war leader; the transcendent politician, parliamentarian and statesman; the adventurer, soldier, orator, historian; the most human of human beings; the man who never knew fear, never admitted defeat, never confused victory with peace, never let prejudice confound progress. He was a manysided genius, the Renaissance man 400 years after the Renaissance.

Though our most cherished and most vivid recollection of him is as the war leader, indomitable, vast, inspiring with his voice 20220-390J

alone millions of men around the world, this day, in this chamber, in this daughter of the mother of parliaments, we pay tribute to the man of the House of Commons in which he served as a member for 64 years. He is the last of a great generation of parliamentary leaders whose skill in parliamentary debate was equalled only by his love of it. No house of commons will see his like again.

We recall, Mr. Speaker, with affection the occasion when his presence and the nobility of his spirit enriched this chamber. We are, I am sure, as one today in acknowledging the immeasurable debt that all free men and the parliaments by which they are served owe to this man. So we wish him and Lady Churchill, a fitting helpmate for such a man, further good years ahead to enjoy the esteem and affection of their millions and millions of friends in every corner of the world.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I join with the right hon. Prime Minister in his tribute to Sir Winston Churchill. We have a double interest, the Prime Minister and I, being members of the imperial privy council, as all privy councillors in Canada have an additional interest in that Sir Winston Churchill is a member of the privy council of our country.

I saw him first almost 48 years ago from the gallery of the House of Commons in Westminster when, following the tribulations of Gallipoli, he was in disgrace. His career, they said, was over. They have said it several times since, and in every case have been wrong. I recall him then, in the uniform of a lieutenant colonel, rising to speak in the British house and that house emptying, as it does when the members desire not to hear the member who is speaking. He was indomitable, courageous, fearless.

I saw him again in the 1930's and again he was the Cassandra of British public men when he foresaw the fear of the shadow of Hitler over Europe. I met him during the early days of war. I said to him "I saw you first when you were in disgrace, Mr. Prime Minister". His reply was "Which time was that?"

He has a sense of humour, a knowledge of history unparalleled in public men. From

Sir Winston Churchill Retirement his earliest days, as the Prime Minister has said, he was a child of the House of Commons. When one goes back to 1896, as his regiment was about to leave for India he recorded these words, "The Churchills peg out early, so I am going to make sure of my innings".

He came into parliament when Sir Wilfrid Laurier had been prime minister for about four years. Queen Victoria was on the throne. He lived through the greatest events in modern history, if not in all history. As the Prime Minister has said, he was orator, warrior, writer, painter; a statesman who has held more positions than any other leader in all the cabinets of the United Kingdom. He is immortal while yet he lives.

In all his greatness, sir, what stands out is that he was always a House of Commons man. His sense of humour, his ability in the thrust and cut of debate, devastating at times, was never wounding. Many examples of his wit are known to members, but the one which particularly appeals to me was in response to an interruption he received from a member whose legs were very short and who from time to time interrupted him. Sir Winston was in the midst of a speech, and his response was "The hon. member should not be so ready to hop down off his perch". That was Churchill. Some of his replies are immortal. None caused more than the temporary disillusionment of those who were the recipients thereof, because he never sought to destroy those with whom he disagreed.

One often hears it said that it must have been wonderful to live in some other age, in the golden ages of the past. We who have lived in the lifetime of Sir Winston Churchill could not ask for more. In the last war, as in the first world war, he was the embodiment of the determination of the British people. When freedom was challenged there were strong men who were filled with fear. One will never forget, as the Prime Minister has said, those words of his during the last war when he took his fellow men from the valley of fear to the heights of Everest. His words are immortal. The music of his language carries a bell tone sincerity cast in the mould of Gibbons and Macaulay. He moved men.

I think of him in a personal sense. I have visited him in his home on several occasions. He is the embodiment of those virtues that have meant so much to Britain's leadership.

The Prime Minister mentioned Lady Churchill. No man can achieve greatness without a wife with the capacity to understand and at the same time be critical in the best

[Mr. Diefenbaker.l

sense of the word. Sir Winston has been blessed with such a wife for more than 57 years. She has been his constant companion, his devoted adviser and the inspiration of his life.

We are not here to speak in the manner of a requiem. We are here as Canadians in the parliament of this country, believing in freedom and knowing what Churchill's contribution has been. May he, as the Prime Minister said, continue for whatever time lies ahead to have the knowledge that wherever freedom lives the name of Churchill will also be revered.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT FROM BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, it is altogether fitting that this House of Commons should pay tribute to the greatest parliamentarian of our time, Right Hon. Sir Winston Churchill. His parliamentary career spans a period of 64 years, with the exception of one short interval of two years. He has occupied his seat in the British House of Commons for the last time. The House of Commons will be a poorer place for his leaving.

However, it is not the length of his service but rather its quality for which he will be remembered for many years with affection and gratitude. Whether as a member of the opposition, a minister of the crown or as prime minister of his country, he brought his great gifts as a parliamentarian and orator to the service of his native land.

History will undoubtedly judge him as the greatest Englishman of this century, and probably one of the greatest of all time. It is astonishing that one man should have crowded so much experience into a single lifetime. It is hard to realize that this man rode with the Lancers at Omdurman; was captured by General Botha in the Boer war; was first lord of the admiralty in world war I and returned to that post at the outbreak of world war II.

However, he will be remembered most for his leadership of Britain and the commonwealth when Hitler's legions were at the gate and we stood almost alone. It was then that his dauntless courage and his matchless oratory came into their own. Someone has said he mobilized the English language and sent it marching into battle in defence of freedom. Mr. Speaker, he did a great deal more. He instilled in others something of his own indomitable spirit and bulldog tenacity. That was not only Britain's finest hour, but no matter how much we may disagree

with him on other matters, that was Churchill's finest hour. No one can take it from him.

He will go down in history as a great war leader who rallied Britain and the commonwealth in their darkest hour to resist nazi aggression and restore peace to a war torn world.

In a very real sense we cannot honour this great man; his deeds have brought him honour far beyond our power to augment by words we may utter. He has won for himself a place among the great figures of history. We can here today, and we do, pay tribute to the great service he has rendered to Britain and the commonwealth, the great contribution he has made to the defence of freedom, and to what he has done for the enhancement of parliamentary institutions.

The members of the New Democratic party join, as I am sure all members of this house and all Canadians do, in expressing to Sir Winston Churchill our deepseated gratitude for a lifetime of devoted service. We express to Sir Winston and Lady Churchill the hope that they may have much health and happiness in the years that lie ahead.

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SC

Alexander Bell Patterson

Social Credit

Mr. A. B. Patterson (Fraser Valley):

Mr. Speaker, I am speaking today in place of our leader, the hon. member for Red Deer, who unfortunately is not able to be present. We in the Social Credit party wish to associate ourselves with those who today are paying tribute to one of the greatest statesmen of all time, Sir Winston Churchill, on the occasion of his retirement from active political life.

I do not intend to repeat what has been said by those who have preceded me, but I would say that the service of this great statesman to his own country and to the free world has never been equalled in the annals of history, nor is it likely to be eclipsed in any future period of time. The memory of those challenges with which he inspired courage, fortitude and the will and determination to triumph over the forces of aggression still thrills the hearts of free men everywhere. His service in various capacities, both in and outside the House of Commons, in times of peace has been an inspiration to all those who strive to fulfil the responsibilities of true and useful citizenship. I wish to read a very brief quotation from an editorial which appeared in the Calgary Albertan:

The one quality which separates great men from failures could be defined as "bounce". In the 30's Churchill was utterly defeated, ridiculed, and cast out of politics. He for a time retired to his home, took out a card as a union member, and laid bricks. Finally his moment of justification

30, 1964

Sir Winston Churchill Retirement

came and his country called him. In his old age he rose to supreme greatness.

May I say that greatness has always been his constant companion. On this occasion we extend our best wishes on his retirement from active political life, and trust that his remaining years will be brightened by the satisfaction of having served with such distinction the cause of peace and justice.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT FROM BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS
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RA

David Réal Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Real Caouelie (Villeneuve):

I wish to join with the Prime Minister, the Leader of the Opposition, other party leaders and all members of the house, I am sure, to pay tribute to that great statesman, Sir Winston Churchill.

This man was prominent in many spheres and he distinguished himself in several fields, while devoting his life to the defence of two great principles he cherished: the British Empire and above all, democracy.

I think that Sir Winston had only one shortcoming, the same as the Leader of the Opposition, in this house, in that he was a Conservative all through his life.

This man was proud of his origin, of his country, of his country's institutions and he fought with courage, often against great odds, to heighten the prestige of Great Britain throughout the world.

And when, in 1939, hell broke loose in Europe, it was Sir Winston Churchill who picked up the torch of freedom and democracy to lead the whole western world into battle against Hitler's domination.

He aroused one and all to greater determination and effort until, after countless sacrifices, freedom and democracy stood triumphant.

Mr. Speaker, as any other man in public life Sir Winston Churchill may have made mistakes, taken questionable stands, but there can be no doubt in my mind that he is retiring today with a heavy balance on the credit side. He remains the symbol of the statesman standing ever upright and on guard. We of the Ralliement Creditiste are happy to associate ourselves with the tribute paid by the previous speakers and to support the motion just brought forward.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT FROM BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

Mr. Speaker, on a question of privilege and in the interests of historical accuracy, perhaps I may be permitted to point out that Sir Winston Churchill, like the

present Leader of the Opposition, was at one stage a Liberal.

Inquiries of the Ministry

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES ON RETIREMENT FROM BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Mr. Speaker, may I remind the right hon. Prime Minister that he was at one time a Conservative.

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RA

David Réal Caouette

Ralliement Créditiste

Mr. Caoueile:

On a point of order, Mr. Speaker.

Could the Prime Minister tell us whether Sir Winston Churchill was at one time a member of the Social Credit party?

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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Prime Minister)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

Well, Mr. Speaker, his ambitions did not reach those heights.

Mr. Speaker, 1 move, seconded by the right hon. Leader of the Opposition:

That the tributes expressed in the house this day on the occasion of the Right Honourable Sir Winston Churchill's announced retirement from parliament be transmitted to the right honourable gentleman as a sign of the high esteem in which he is held by the Canadian people.

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Motion agreed to.


PUBLIC PEACE AND ORDER

PROVISION FOR COMPENSATION IN CASE OF INJURY OR DEATH

PC

James Norris Ormiston

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. N. Ormiston (Melville) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. C-114, to approve the ex gratia payment of compensation to persons injured by aiding and assisting the Governor General to preserve and maintain the public peace and order and to dependants of persons killed thereby.

Topic:   PUBLIC PEACE AND ORDER
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR COMPENSATION IN CASE OF INJURY OR DEATH
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?

Some hon. Members:

Explain.

Topic:   PUBLIC PEACE AND ORDER
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR COMPENSATION IN CASE OF INJURY OR DEATH
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PC

James Norris Ormiston

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ormiston:

Mr. Speaker, since it is the duty of all citizens to assist the law enforcing authorities to maintain order, those persons who are injured in the discharge of this duty are entitled to remuneration, as are the dependants of those who are killed. This bill affirms the principle that the government has a duty to award compensation to those injured, or to the dependants of those killed, in attempting to put down crime; and it provides the procedure whereby applicants may petition the government for grace and favour compensation.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   PUBLIC PEACE AND ORDER
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR COMPENSATION IN CASE OF INJURY OR DEATH
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LABOUR RELATIONS

MARITIME UNION TRUSTEES


On the orders of the day:


July 30, 1964