May 20, 1963

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Maurice Bourget (Speaker of the Senate)

Mr. Speaker:

The hon. member for Burn-aby-Coquitlam (Mr. Douglas) moves the adjournment of the debate. Is it agreed?

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill (Secretary of State of Canada; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

Under the circumstances, sir, I wonder if Your Honour would see that it was ten o'clock.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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Maurice Bourget (Speaker of the Senate)

Mr. Speaker:

Ten o'clock.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Official Opposition House Leader; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Churchill:

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if for purposes of identification the house leader would care to get his name on Hansard again and announce the business for tomorrow and the rest of the week?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill (Secretary of State of Canada; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

I must say, sir, that I deeply appreciate the solicitude of the hon. member for Winnipeg South Centre for my publicity. I hope he will continue to be my publicity agent, because I know I am going to need one.

To speak seriously, sir, it is the hope of the government that this debate will be continued uninterrupted until it is concluded. After what has been said by the hon. member for Red Deer this evening the government would, of course, be very grateful if we could conclude the debate a day or two earlier than the full length of time allowed by the rules. However, we are not wishing in any way to restrict the right to speak of any hon. member who has something to say.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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At ten o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order.


APPENDIX

LETTER AND TERMS OF REFERENCE RESPECTING ROYAL COMMISSION ON BICULTURALISM


(The following letter was sent to the premiers of all provinces)


PRIME MINISTER CANADA


Ottawa, May 15, 1963 My dear Premier: In a speech I made in the House of Commons on December 17, 1962, on the problems posed, and the opportunities offered, in Canada by the duality of language and culture established by confederation, I suggested that a broad and comprehensive inquiry should be conducted, in consultation with the provinces, on bilingualism and biculturalism. That proposal received widespread support in parliament and, I believe, in the country. I am now writing to ask whether your government would favour such an inquiry by a royal commission with terms of reference such as those annexed to this letter. Any recommendations from the proposed commission would, of course, not be binding on governments; nor would approval by your government of such a commission with these terms of reference imply any commitment to accept any recommendations that it might make. I would be most grateful for your early consideration of this matter. Yours sincerely, Lester B. Pearson.


COMMISSION OF INQUIRY ON BILINGUALISM AND BICULTURALISM


To inquire into and report upon the existing state of bilingualism and biculturalism in Canada and to recommend what steps should be taken to develop the Canadian confederation on the basis of an equal partnership between the two founding races, taking into account the contribution made by the other ethnic groups to the cultural enrichment of Canada and the measures that should be taken to safeguard that contribution; and, in particular, 1. to report upon the situation and practice of bilingualism within all branches and agencies of the federal administration- including crown corporations-and in their communications with the public and to make recommendations designed to ensure the bilingual and the basically bicultural character of the federal administration; 2. to report on the role of the public and private cultural organizations, including the mass communications media, in promoting bilingualism, better cultural relations and a more widespread appreciation of the basically bicultural character of our country and of the subsequent contribution made by the other cultures; and to recommend what should be done to improve that role; and 3. having regard to the fact that constitutional jurisdiction over education is vested in the provinces, to discuss with the provincial governments the opportunities available to Canadians to learn the English and French languages and to recommend what could be done to enable Canadians to become bilingual.



Tuesday, May 21, 1963


May 20, 1963