December 17, 1962

PC

Hugh John Flemming (Minister of National Revenue; Minister of Forestry)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Flemming (Victoria-Carleion):

(a) December 22, 1960.

(b) October 18, 1962.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PUBLICATION OF TECHNICAL FORESTRY MEMORANDA
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DOWNSTREAM POWER BENEFITS, COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY

LIB

Mr. Davis

Liberal

1. Did the Canadian government arrange for a competent engineering firm or firms to evaluate the amount of downstream power and flood control benefits created in the United States by the proposed Columbia river treaty project prior to the signing of the treaty?

2. What is the estimated amount of the downstream prime power benefits which are returnable to Canada under the present Columbia river treaty in the years 1970, 1980, 1990 and 2000?

3. What is the principal reason, or reasons, for any change in these annual benefits during the life of the Columbia river treaty?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DOWNSTREAM POWER BENEFITS, COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY
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PC

Walter Gilbert Dinsdale (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dinsdale:

1. A competent international group of engineers who had assisted in the preparation of the terms of the treaty evaluated the approximate downstream benefits obtainable under those terms. These engineers represented the following agencies:

Canadian Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources; Canadian section, international joint commission; British Columbia power commission; British Columbia department of lands, forests and water resources; United States corps of engineers; Bonneville power administration (United States department of the interior).

2. The treaty, in accordance with international joint commission power principle No. 4, does not call for the division of prime power benefits. However, Canada's share of the increase in average annual usable energy produced in the United States by Canadian storage is to be returned to Canada in equal amounts each month and is therefore a prime power resource to Canada. Estimates of quantities are available for the years 1972, 1985,

and 2010 and are as indicated below: It has to be emphasized that these are estimates and may not occur to the extent indicated at the various dates.

Prime Capacity AvailableEnergy in in LoadYear Megawatt Years Megawatts Factor1972 768 1375 56%1985 400 1230 33%2010 210 0 -

These benefits are exclusive of downstream benefits generated at Canadian plants on the Kootenay river in Canada through storage operation at the Duncan lake and Libby dams.

3. During the initial years of the treaty period, Canadian storage will be called upon to provide three services:

(a) Release stored water over a critical streamflow period and thereby increase primary energy production at the United States generators (Canada's capacity credit is equal to one half of this primary energy benefit divided by the critical period load factor).

(b) Conserve water which existing United States generators could use to produce secondary energy, but for which no secondary energy markets are presently available. This water is then released at times when firm or secondary loads require it.

(c) Conserve water which would presently exceed the hydraulic capacity of existing United States generators and later release this water at times when the generating facilities could use it and when firm or secondary loads require it.

(Canadian energy credit is one half of the increase in usable energy developed by (b) and (c)).

By approximately the mid point of the treaty period it is expected that the thermal-electric component of the United States system will have developed to the point where all secondary energy generation at hydroelectric plants will be usable as thermal replacement energy (to conserve fuel at thermal plants). The regulation service outlined in section (b) above would, if this happened, no longer be necessary and Canada's energy

credit would reduce accordingly. Regulation to produce maximum primary energy would still be required and therefore no substantial change in Canada's capacity entitlement is expected.

Towards the end of the treaty period it is expected that the United States thermal-electric development will have increased to the point where the ultimate hydroelectric installations at the United States plants will be usable on the United States load without the assistance of primary energy from storage operation. Canada's capacity benefits would, if this happened, decrease to zero. At the same time the added facilities at the United States hydroelectric plants would be capable of producing more and more power from unregulated flows of the river and as a result the need for Canadian storage for average energy generation under (c) would also decrease. Once the maximum feasible number of hydroelectric units have been

Questions

installed at United States plants (assumed for the year 2010), Canada's remaining energy benefits should remain relatively constant for the balance of the treaty period.

Whether or not the above mentioned set of conditions will ever occur cannot be known in advance. Therefore, the treaty is designed to measure benefits under any conditions that may actually occur in the future.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DOWNSTREAM POWER BENEFITS, COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY
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COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY

LIB

Mr. Davis

Liberal

Of the total amount of prime power created as a result of the construction of the Columbia river treaty projects in Canada, what proportion is returnable to Canada, and how much is estimated as remaining in the United States in the year 1970?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY
Sub-subtopic:   DIVISION OF POWER
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PC

Walter Gilbert Dinsdale (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dinsdale:

The following table sets forth the increase of both primary and average annual energy benefits from the treaty for estimated load conditions in the period 1970-72 (all data expressed in megawatt years):

Saleable Total Usable Energy

Primary 4- Secondary - (Primary -)- SaleableU.S. system with Energy EnergyU) Secondary)Canadian storage: 9063 939 10,002U.S. system without Canadian storage: 6861 1606 8,467

The increment of primary energy after the introduction of Canadian storage is thus 2202 MW years, of which 667 are the firming up of saleable secondary energy already available in the U.S. The increment in average annual usable energy (which is the product to be divided in accordance with I.J.C. power principle No. 4 and under annex B paragraph 1 of the treaty) is thus 2202-667 = 1535 MW years. Canada would receive 50 per cent of this gain, or 768 MW years of energy.

* Assumes the Hanford atomic energy works operating as a single purpose development for the production of thermal-electric energy and therefore providing a substantial thermal replacement market for secondary hydroelectric energy. With this plant operating as a dual purpose project (plutonium and

thermal energy production) it would operate continuously and therefore not provide a secondary energy market. Under this latter condition Canada's energy benefits are presently estimated to be 820 megawatt years rather than the 768 megawatt years indicated in the table.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY
Sub-subtopic:   DIVISION OF POWER
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REVENUE OF BANDS, MIRAMICHI INDIAN AGENCY, N.B.

LIB

Mr. McWilliam

Liberal

What revenues have been derived by each of the Indian bands of the Miramichi Indian agency at Red Bank, Eel Grounds, and Burnt Church on the sale of gravel, sand, logs, pulpwood, and Christmas trees, and for any other revenue producing transactions, for each year from 1955 to 1961 inclusive?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   REVENUE OF BANDS, MIRAMICHI INDIAN AGENCY, N.B.
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PC

Frank Charles McGee (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McGee:

Red Bank 1955-56 1956-57 1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62Timber dues

613.38 1210.16 782.53 826.16 1668.35 1637.20 414.63Gravel and sand

97.34 329.20

30.46 100.00 46.90 100 00Gov.t int

715.37 697.37 689.14 724.98 758.57 812.49 695.84Fishing rights

37.50

Rentals 25.00 62.50 62.50 37.50

27507-3-172J

Questions

Eel Ground 1955-56 1956-57Timber dues . 279.44 494.91Rentals ,. 125.00 25.00Gov.t int . 236.39 264.74Burnt Church Rentals . . 100.00 100.00Gov.t int , . 124.09 111.95

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   REVENUE OF BANDS, MIRAMICHI INDIAN AGENCY, N.B.
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BALSAM WOOLLY APHID

PC

Mr. Fairwealher

Progressive Conservative

1. Does the balsam woolly aphid pose a serious economic threat in Canada?

2. What is the Department of Forestry doing to reduce the effects of this insect in eastern Canada, especially in Newfoundland?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BALSAM WOOLLY APHID
Sub-subtopic:   FORESTRY THREAT
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PC

Hugh John Flemming (Minister of National Revenue; Minister of Forestry)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Flemming (Vicioria-Carleion):

1. The

balsam woolly aphid is a foreign pest that reached the maritime provinces several decades ago and Newfoundland in the late 1940's. It is also well known in northeast and northwest United States and was found in southwest British Columbia in 1958. In the maritimes, the distribution and population level of the balsam woolly aphid have been static in recent years; unusually cold winters are a major controlling factor. However, a great deal of tree mortality has occurred over the past 30 years and normal stand development has been prevented or delayed over wide areas. In Newfoundland, outbreaks near St. John's on the Burin peninsula, and particularly along the southwest coast are causing considerable tree mortality and deterioration. Recently the aphid was found in central Newfoundland and intensive surveys are establishing just how widespread it is. In British Columbia, the outbreak is still restricted to an area in the lower Fraser river valley but many thousands of trees have been killed or defoliated. The balsam woolly aphid is unquestionably a serious forest pest and the Department of Forestry is studying biological, chemical, and silvicultural methods of control.

2. The Department of Forestry has long been interested in the balsam woolly aphid problem in eastern Canada. The biology and habits of the insect are reasonably well understood and the distribution and status of the pest are under continuous surveillance. The results are regularly communicated to provincial authorities and interested industries in publications and reports. A concerted ground and aerial survey was organized in 1962 in central Newfoundland where the aphid was first observed in 1961.

The cryptic habits of the insect make control with conventional chemicals difficult except on individual trees. However, recently developed systemic insecticides offer some

1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62659.14 119.27 522.95 500.97 197.04612.00 62.50 37.50 175.00 285.20 296.20 287.58 292.04 264.3660.95 304.50 14.00 867.65100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 120.27 127.53 128.73 138.55 141.45hope of controlling the aphid with aerial

sprays. Their effectiveness is being tested in carefully devised laboratory experiments and small scale field trials may be conducted in Newfoundland next year.

Past efforts have been directed mainly toward biological and silvicultural controls. Potential predators are being studied in several countries and a number of species have been released in Canada with modest success. At least four are now established in the maritime provinces and Newfoundland but the degree of control is not yet satisfactory. This program is continuing with the major emphasis in Newfoundand in the hope that better predators will be found or that the present efforts become more effective with the passage of time, as often happens in biological control programs. Research is in progress on means of converting forest stands to a high proportion of non-susceptible species by controlled burning, by reducing natural fir reproduction, or by planting exotic tree species.

In summary, the Department of Forestry is exploring all reasonable prospects for controlling the balsam woolly aphid as actively as possible.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BALSAM WOOLLY APHID
Sub-subtopic:   FORESTRY THREAT
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NEWFOUNDLAND OVERSEAS FORESTRY UNIT

NDP

Mr. Douglas

New Democratic Party

Has the Minister of Veterans Affairs received representations from the chairman of the Placentia branch of the Newfoundland overseas forestry unit concerning this unit's inclusion under the veterans charter and, if so, what answer has been given?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NEWFOUNDLAND OVERSEAS FORESTRY UNIT
Sub-subtopic:   INCLUSION UNDER VETERANS CHARTER
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Veterans Affairs; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Churchill:

The Minister of Veterans Affairs has received such representations and the following answer has been given:

When the Civilian War Pensions and Allowances Act was amended last year, the Canadian government recognized that the Newfoundland foresters, along with a number of other groups, had aided materially in the war effort.

A comparison has been made between the services of the forestry unit and those of the Newfoundland forestry unit of world war I, which formed part of the imperial forces, and the Canadian forestry corps of world war II, which was a corps within the Canadian army.

These latter units formed part of the armed forces and were subject to military discipline in all respects. However, members of the Newfoundland forestry unit of world war II were not recognized by the Newfoundland commission of government as members of the forces, and they served as civilians under contracts willingly entered into with specified rates of pay, length of service, etc.

With regard to the restriction contained in part XI of the Civilian War Pensions and Allowances Act concerning the length of contract entered into, I am pleased to advise you that the war veterans allowance board, after securing legal opinion, has been able to modify its ruling in favour of those foresters who, although they did not sign contracts for the duration, actually served until the end of world war II and received discharge certificates dated after May 8, 1945.

The basic definition of a "veteran" is a former member of H.M. armed forces and consequently cannot apply to former members of the Newfoundland forestry unit of world war II or to the other civilian groups covered under the Civilian War Pensions and Allowances Act.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NEWFOUNDLAND OVERSEAS FORESTRY UNIT
Sub-subtopic:   INCLUSION UNDER VETERANS CHARTER
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STUDY OF AIR POLLUTION

NDP

Mr. Mather

New Democratic Party

Is the government giving consideration to the advisability of an examination of the problem of air pollution so that steps may be taken to protect Canadians against the detrimental effects of same?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STUDY OF AIR POLLUTION
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?

Arza Clair Casselman

Mrs. Casselman:

During the past four years the Department of National Health and Welfare has been developing a national air sampling network in co-operation with the provinces and large municipalities for the purpose of measuring levels of air pollution and determining the influence of community sources on diurnal and seasonal factors. Advisory, consultant and laboratory services are being supplied, as requested, to provincial health departments and municipalities in the organization of air pollution surveys, the assessment of control measures and the analysis of samples.

In addition research in a number of universities is being assisted under the national health grants. Research is also being carried on in the laboratories of the department to develop better methods of determining the small amounts of pollutants found in the air and studying their effects on health.

To supplement this program, close contact is being maintained with all other countries having advanced programs in this field.

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STUDY OF AIR POLLUTION
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RESEARCH PROGRAM IN PHYSICAL FITNESS, U.B.C.

December 17, 1962