November 30, 1962

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

ERROR IN LISTING OP BUSINESS ON ORDER PAPER

PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I note that the gremlins have been at work again and that there is an unfortunate transposition at the top of page 3 in the order of business as listed on today's order paper. There has been a reversal in the positions of public and private bills, and therefore those items which have precedence from five to six o'clock should be public bills, not private bills as indicated. This transposition appears in both the English and French versions, so the gremlins were quite impartial.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ERROR IN LISTING OP BUSINESS ON ORDER PAPER
Permalink

PRIVILEGE

MR. KNOWLES NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ELECTIONS ACT BY GOVERNMENT APPOINTEES

NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader; Whip of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege. We as members of the house are governed by certain statutes, the provisions of which we must comply with, and one of those statutes is the Canada Elections Act. Nevertheless we have been informed in the house in recent days that certain candidates in the last election, who are also required to comply with the provisions of the Canada Elections Act, have been appointed to certain positions, and a sessional paper, No. IB, tabled yesterday, indicates that two of these persons, namely Mr. Creaghan, who is now a judge of the county court in New Brunswick, and Senator O'Leary, are in violation of the Canada Elections Act in that they have not filed their election expense returns.

My point of privilege is that the law should apply to all who are candidates in a general election, not only to those who are elected, and that the Prime Minister should have looked into this matter before these appointments were made.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. KNOWLES NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ELECTIONS ACT BY GOVERNMENT APPOINTEES
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

In so far as the first statement is concerned, Mr. Speaker, I am in agreement, but the Prime Minister has no responsibility to see whether or not candidates comply with the law.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. KNOWLES NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ELECTIONS ACT BY GOVERNMENT APPOINTEES
Permalink
LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

On the question of privilege, Mr. Speaker-

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. KNOWLES NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ELECTIONS ACT BY GOVERNMENT APPOINTEES
Permalink
PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Order. The hon. member has raised a question of privilege, and I do not think we can carry on any discussion of the subject matter of the privilege without there being a motion in that regard. Before we could have a general discussion on this point the hon. member would have to make a motion, if the point is indeed one of privilege. I believe the matter he has raised is rather novel, and I would hesitate to give a snap judgment on whether he has a question of privilege or not. It may be a grievance. But again I would reserve decision as to whether there is a question of privilege, because to my mind there can be no question of a discussion thereon unless there is a motion, and there cannot be a motion unless the Chair does recognize that there is a prima facie case of privilege.

On the orders of the day:

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. KNOWLES NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ELECTIONS ACT BY GOVERNMENT APPOINTEES
Permalink
LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Hon. J. W. Pickersgill (Bonavisfa-Twillin-gale):

I wonder if I might ask the Prime Minister whether it is his intention or the intention of anyone in the government to report to the recently appointed judge of a county court in New Brunswick the reported infraction of the law, with a view to making sure that the judge, like other citizens, complies with the law.

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime

Minister): Mr. Speaker, in so far as compliance with the law is concerned, that is a matter for each individual. Certainly what has taken place here today will come to the attention of the judge.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. KNOWLES NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ELECTIONS ACT BY GOVERNMENT APPOINTEES
Permalink

SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL


FELICITATIONS ON 88tH BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, I ask for the indulgence of the house to make a motion which I intend to present and ask the Leader of the Opposition to second. Today is the birthday anniversary of Sir Winston Churchill-


?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

-a member of the privy council of Canada. I saw him first in the fall

Felicitations to Sir Winston Churchill of 1916 from the gallery of the British House of Commons, at that time out of office and in the shadows. I heard him speak there. I heard him again on a number of occasions during the 1930's when his voice, while heard, was not listened to. I heard him following one of his several constituency defeats. Many hon. members in this house heard him in 1942 when he spoke during one of the darkest days of war, when he used those immortal words descriptive of Great Britain and the commonwealth, "Some chicken, some neck".

I saw him last during the occasion of the prime ministers' conference in London. I had quite a lengthy chat with him. If I were to summarize the message which he gave, to which I alluded on an earlier occasion, it would be this, "Freedom must not fear fear" -the same indomitable spirit, the same courage, the same man who in defeat knew no defeat and in victory, while resolute, was always considerate. I think of the description of this man given in 1954 by one of Canada's great orators. Speaking in the city of Toronto these words were quoted by him:

Strange Is the vigour in a brave man's soul. The strength oi his spirit and his irresistible power, the greatness of his heart and the height of his condition, his mighty confidence and contempt of dangers, his true security and repose in himself, his liberty to dare and do, his alacrity in the midst of fears, his invincible temper, are advantages which make him master of fortune. His courage fits him for all attempts, makes him serviceable to God and man, and makes him the bulwark and defence of his being and country.

In that passage Mr. Brockington was quoting the words of a mystic Celtic poet in a little parsonage in the deep countryside of western England. The words were 300 years old. All would agree that mankind would have been poorer had he not lived. Indeed, the flame of freedom might well have been extinguished for generations but for him. Proud to be an Englishman, he belongs to every country which treasures freedom. He has lived to enjoy in the autumn of life the satisfaction that comes to few men, to know that he is loved.

Sir, it is therefore my honour and privilege to move a resolution to be transmitted to him, one of the greatest, if not the greatest, House of Commons man and parliamentarian in all British history. So that he may know he has the affectionate good wishes of the members of this house I move, seconded by the Leader of the Opposition:

That this house extend to the Right Hon. Sir Winston Churchill, K.G., O.M., M.P. its warmest congratulations on this, his 88th birthday anniversary.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Permalink
LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I have great pleasure indeed in seconding the motion which

has been moved in such a felicitous way by the Prime Minister, a resolution which embodies the affectionate good wishes and sincere congratulations of this house on the birthday anniversary of Sir Winston Churchill. It is a happy circumstance that we should have in Ottawa at this time, and perhaps in the house this morning, the Canadian high commissioner to the United Kingdom who might possibly be charged by you, sir, with the mission of conveying this resolution in person when he returns to London.

Sir Winston is a man who has been equal to his times and, therefore, is already a man for the ages. He is one of the few men in history who have always been able to match the events they faced. As members of parliament ourselves we think of him, of course, as a great parliamentarian. But we think of him also, and always will, as the chief architect of the victory of free men over nazi tyranny. No one will be able to forget the inspiration of his words and of his person during the darker days of that struggle, and how indomitable his courage was in those days. And when victory was won we remember how far sighted he was in his approach to the problems of peace, how he rose above personal and political misfortunes, how he rose above the prejudice of national fears and looked forward to the day when all free men might be able to unite for progress and peace.

He was also the most human of human beings. I am personally very much aware of this because, like the Prime Minister, I was so fortunate as to have some association with him and, in common with all those who have ever had any association with him, I could add to the store of anecdotes which has gathered around him, for he is a man about whom legends gather and incomparable stories are told even during his lifetime; a man who has dominated history not only by his achievements but by his personality. So we rejoice with him today on his reaching 88 years and we send to him the old, old birthday wish, "Many happy returns".

(Translation):

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Permalink
SC

David Réal Caouette

Social Credit

Mr. Real Caouetle (Villeneuve):

Mr. Speaker, we are happy to join with the Prime Minister in extending our good wishes to Sir Winston Churchill who is celebrating today his 88th birthday.

Sir Winston was assuredly one of the most outstanding and remarkable figures for over 60 years. As a matter of fact, he took an active part in two world wars.

As the Leader of the Opposition just pointed out, Sir Winston has become a symbol of integrity, a symbol of courage and a sym-

Tabling of Letter and Resolution bol of industry. He worked without respite the people of Great Britain and the common-for the cause of freedom in the whole world, wealth, and free men everywhere, to put He was the actual leader during the second forth their maximum effort to resist nazi world war, when he fought relentlessly against oppression. We in this country, and people totalitarian regimes of dictators like Hitler all over the free world today, are deeply in and Mussolini. his debt.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Permalink
SC
?

An hon. Member:

He defended his country. (Text):

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Permalink
?

An hon. Member:

At last.

Topic:   SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Permalink

November 30, 1962