November 28, 1962

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

MEETING OF PRIME MINISTERS OF UNITED KINGDOM AND CANADA

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, today in the British House of Commons Prime Minister Macmillan announced that an invitation had been extended to me to meet with him on the occasion of his visit to the Bahamas in December. I had asked him whether he would visit Ottawa and give the Canadian government his views generally on the world situation, and he advised me that in view of his projected visit to President de Gaulle and the nearness of Christmas it would be difficult for him to accept. However, he informed me that he would welcome me in the Bahamas on December 21 if this could be arranged. He pointed out that this meeting would permit of a useful exchange of views.

I have discussed this matter with my colleagues and it has been agreed that I should accept and meet with him on this occasion.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTERS OF UNITED KINGDOM AND CANADA
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Essex East):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure we will all regret that the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom does not find it possible to come to Canada on the occasion of his forthcoming visit with the President of the United States. I believe the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom will be meeting the President for the fourth time somewhere in North America. We in this house and Canadians generally will certainly note with satisfaction the invitation which has been extended to the Prime Minister to meet with the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. We presume that the invitation which has been extended by the latter also includes an invitation yet to come from the President of the United States. We all recall with satisfaction the important and fruitful visits which Mr. Mackenzie King and his successor Mr. St. Laurent had with Presidents Roosevelt, Truman and Eisenhower. These confrontations proved of great value to the countries concerned and undoubtedly made their contributions in turn to peaceful developments in the world. We will hope that such a meeting as the Prime Minister has mentioned will have nothing but good results for the countries concerned and for the peace of the world.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTERS OF UNITED KINGDOM AND CANADA
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?

Mr. A. B. Palferson@Fraser Valley

Mr. Speaker, I am sure we all wish the Prime Minister every success as he accepts this invitation and confers with the Prime Minister of Great Britain. I believe these opportunities which present themselves from time to time are not only of value but are of importance in the continued maintenance of the very best relationships with Britain and also with the United States. So on behalf of this group we wish the Prime Minister every success at this conference.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTERS OF UNITED KINGDOM AND CANADA
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquillam):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure all hon. members are sorry that the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom will not be able to visit Canada this time, and hope this will be possible at a later date. I am sure, however, we are delighted that an invitation has been extended to our Prime Minister to meet with Prime Minister Macmillan and we hope also with President Kennedy. On behalf of our group, and I am sure this is shared by all groups in the house, we are glad he has been invited, we are delighted he has accepted, and he will go to that conference with our good wishes and our good will.

(Translation):

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTERS OF UNITED KINGDOM AND CANADA
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PRIVILEGE

MR. MARCOUX PUBLICATION OF REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION

SC

Guy Marcoux

Social Credit

Mr. Guy Marcoux (Quebec-Monimorency):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege, I would like to commend the government and all those responsible for the simultaneous publication of the French and English versions of the Glassco report.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. MARCOUX PUBLICATION OF REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION
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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

This is in order. I feel I can tell the hon. member that his remarks are in order.

(Text):

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. MARCOUX PUBLICATION OF REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.) (Translation):


ALLEGED FAULTY WHARF CONSTRUCTION

SC

Mr. Dumont

Social Credit

1. Was a proficiency certificate awarded to the firm responsible for building the west side of the federal Department of Transport's wharf in Quebec city, which is now crumbling into the river after six or seven years of existence?

2. Does the Minister of Transport favour the construction of a tunnel between Levis and Quebec city and, if so, what is the amount of the grant that the government would extend?

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED FAULTY WHARF CONSTRUCTION
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PC

George Ernest Halpenny (Secretary of State of Canada)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Halpenny:

1. It is not up to the Department of Public Works to award proficiency certificates to anyone. The abovementioned wharf was built by the Department of Public Works for the Department of Transport and was completed in 1957 by the contractor, in accordance with the specifications. Since then, a landslip has caused the structure to subside somewhat, but the wharf is still in constant use.

2. Any announcement of the government's intended policy in this connection will be made in the usual way.

(Text):

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED FAULTY WHARF CONSTRUCTION
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PROFESSIONAL FULL TIME CIVIL SERVANTS

LIB

Mr. Matheson

Liberal

1. How many professional full time civil servants were employed during the month of December 1961 in the following departments or agencies: justice, commissioner of penitentiaries, Royal Canadian Mounted Police?

2. What percentage of total employees were professional in each of the aforesaid departments or agencies?

3. What was the breakdown of professions in each department or agency?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROFESSIONAL FULL TIME CIVIL SERVANTS
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PC

Thomas Miller Bell (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bell (Saint John-Albert):

1. Department of Justice, including legal branch, investigation and research branch, restrictive trade practices commission, bankruptcy, national parole board, supreme and exchequer courts, N.W.T. and the Y.T., 116; Commissioner of penitentiaries, 50; Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Two professional full time civil servants were employed in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police during the month of December 1961. In addition 31 professional members of the force were employed during the same month.

2. Department of Justice, including legal branch, investigation and research branch, restrictive trade practices commission, bankruptcy, national parole board, supreme and exchequer courts, N.W.T. and the Y.T., 29.4; Commissioner of penitentiaries, 1.8; Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Of the total number of civil servants employed in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 0.15 per cent were professional and of the total number of members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 0.5 per cent were professional.

3. Department of Justice, including legal branch, investigation and research branch, restrictive trade practices commission, bankruptcy, national parole board, supreme and exchequer courts, N.W.T. and the Y.T.: Lawyers, 72; Librarians, 5; Psychologists, 3; Economists, 7; Social workers, 14; Chartered accountants, 4; Education, 2; Theology and philosophy, 3; Arts, 2; Commerce, 4.

Commissioner of penitentiaries; Lawyers, 1; Physicians, 4; Psychiatrists, 1; Psychologists, 15; Criminologists, 1; Sociologists, 1; Social workers, 3; Chaplains, 18; Engineers, 1; Agriculturists, 1; Nurses, 4.

Note: Of the above, 3 employees are civil servants in that their positions are classified under the Civil Service Act. All others were appointed under authority of the Penitentiary Act.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Civil servants: Engineers, 1; Chemists, 1. Members of the R.C.M. Police: Dietitians, 7; Scientists, 6; Chemists, 15; Engineers, 2; Pharmacists, 1.

Note: In addition to the professional full time civil servants and members of the force listed above one civil servant and 51 members of the force have graduated from universities.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROFESSIONAL FULL TIME CIVIL SERVANTS
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R.CJVI.P. INVESTIGATIONS-INJURY TO REPUTATIONS

LIB

Mr. Matheson

Liberal

1. Have complaints been received since December 31, 1957, respecting injury to reputation of persons arising out of R.C.M.P. investigative functions?

2. Has any procedure been developed to rectify such injury in appropriate cases?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   R.CJVI.P. INVESTIGATIONS-INJURY TO REPUTATIONS
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November 28, 1962