November 15, 1962

ANNOUNCEMENT OP MEETING AT MINISTERIAL LEVEL

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, on October 19, as reported at page 699 of Hansard, I placed before the house the response of the President of the United States to the suggestion I had made in a letter to him representing, as it did, a matter that I brought before the commonwealth prime ministers' conference in London. I now wish to report what has taken place since.

Representatives of the nations who are parties to the general agreement on tariffs and trade now meeting in Geneva have agreed that a ministerial meeting should be held in the early part of 1963 to consider a program for effective liberalization and expansion of trade in both primary and secondary products. I think I can do no better in this connection than to read from a press communique which will be released today by the GATT secretariat. It says that the contracting parties have agreed that a ministerial meeting should be held in the early part of 1963 to consider such a program to which I have already referred.

-full weight should be attached to the importance and urgency of negotiating solutions to problems of trade in primary products and to the additional trade problems of less developed countries. The proposal that such a meeting should be held was made jointly by governments of the United States of America and Canada.

A precise date for the meeting should be determined by the council of representatives.

The council should be convened for this purpose by the executive secretary at the earliest possible date that he feels that necessary elements exist for arriving at a decision.

In this connection, due weight should be attached to the fact that in order to enable the United States of America to play a full part in a further substantial and early movement for reduction of tariffs and other barriers to trade, it is desirable that the necessary decision to initiate such a movement be taken early in 1963.

Council should at the same time propose an agenda for the meeting of ministers and make adequate preparation for the meeting.

I know the house will appreciate the fact, as it says in the communique, that Canada and the United States jointly proposed in Geneva that this meeting be held. This

decision is directly in line, as I said a moment ago, with the proposal I made for a meeting of like minded nations to consider these trade questions, which received the endorsement and support of President Kennedy last month. Representatives in Geneva have agreed that at this important meeting full weight should be attached to the urgency of negotiating solutions to the problems mentioned therein. That is in entire accordance with the Canadian views, and the government welcomes this decision.

The exact date of the conference will be settled at an early meeting of the GATT council. Arrangements will be made for Canada to be represented at this very important meeting by the Minister of Trade and Commerce and possibly by other ministers as well. I believe that a meeting at this time will have the most far reaching and beneficial results throughout the free world, and will open great possibilities for expanding trade and in consequence expansion in the Canadian economy.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OP MEETING AT MINISTERIAL LEVEL
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SC

Robert Norman Thompson

Social Credit

Mr. R. N. Thompson (Red Deer):

Mr. Speaker, I should just like to express briefly my own satisfaction in hearing what the Prime Minister has had to say with regard to this world trade meeting as to which our good neighbour to the south and Canada have taken the initiative. Certainly this is a very desirable thing, owing to the simple fact that in the cold war of which we are a part it is impossible to separate the economic aspect, which here vitally concerns the freer exchange of goods amongst the nations and peoples of the earth in order better to meet the needs of people everywhere. In working on the agenda, as the Prime Minister has mentioned, I believe that one of the most important aspects, in addition to the lowering of tariff walls which tend to restrict trade, is the problem of international settlements. In the same way that we were in desperate trouble internally in the thirties with the problem of exchange, so are we now in trouble externally. Here is presented an excellent opportunity to be dealing with this problem in the wider aspect of world trade.

I would also just add this word to the Prime Minister and to his Minister of Trade and Commerce. It is excellent for us to be planning for the long term in relation to trade, but it is also important for us to be planning for the immediate objectives which

GATT Meeting at Ministerial Level we must reach as well. I am sure the government is doing all that it can. I would just add this word in order to impress again the importance of meeting some of these trade problems. We cannot separate our foreign policies from our trade policies, since the real offensive that is directed against us is an economic one.

I am pleased, as I am sure are all of us, that this action is being taken now. Again I would urge that we go forward and bring to the matter the leadership in this regard which I think the people of the world are waiting for, and give some further assurance that we can still live in a day of peace when the development of the world's resources can go forward as it should.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OP MEETING AT MINISTERIAL LEVEL
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, the members of the party with which I am associated welcome the news that a ministers' conference may be held to remove trade barriers between nations and encourage a freer exchange of goods and services among the GATT countries. Hon. members in all parts of the house have expressed their approval of a greater liberalization of trade. I would point out, however, that this objective is not accomplished by having surcharges such as we have had over the last while. I should like to express the hope that by the time Canada attends such a conference we shall go to it with clean hands and with our surcharges completely removed.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OP MEETING AT MINISTERIAL LEVEL
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PUBLIC SERVICE

ANNOUNCEMENT RESPECTING CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEARS HOLIDAYS

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, it is traditional

at this time of year, and I have been requested by representatives of the civil service to make a statement in this regard, for the government to review the Christmas holiday situation to determine whether civil servants and other government employees should be given time off in addition to the statutory holidays of Christmas day and New Year's day. This year these two holidays fall on Tuesdays. The government has decided that the preceding Mondays, December 24 and December 31, shall be allowed as additional holidays for civil servants and other government employees. However, I should point out that the exigencies of the public service may require a number of civil servants and other government employees to work on these holidays, but any such persons will receive additional time off in lieu of these days or additional

pay in compensation for the extra work, depending on the laws applicable in each case.

Topic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT RESPECTING CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEARS HOLIDAYS
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INQUIRY AS TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF SALARY INCREASES


On the orders of the day:


NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader; Whip of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, may I direct a question to the Minister of Finance. Further to the announcement made today by the Prime Minister regarding civil service holidays during the Christmas period, will there also be an announcement before Christmas regarding the unfreezing of civil service pay increases?

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF SALARY INCREASES
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PC

George Clyde Nowlan (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. George C. Nowlan (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, if and when such an announcement is made it will be made in the House of Commons.

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF SALARY INCREASES
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NDP

Stanley Howard Knowles (N.D.P. House Leader; Whip of the N.D.P.)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Knowles:

A supplementary question. Will the minister be meeting the representatives of civil service organizations on this question shortly?

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF SALARY INCREASES
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PC

George Clyde Nowlan (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Nowlan:

I hope to have further conferences with the representatives of the various organizations in the relatively near future.

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF SALARY INCREASES
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UNITED NATIONS

DISARMAMENT

PC

Howard Charles Green (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Howard C. Green (Secretary of Slate for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to inform the house that the 18 nation committee on disarmament will resume negotiations in Geneva on November 26. General Burns will be returning to Geneva shortly, after consultations here, and will lead the Canadian delegation.

Two questions should receive priority when the 18 nation committee resumes. First and foremost is the urgent need to reach agreement on the cessation of nuclear weapons tests in accordance with the resolution which war recently adopted at the general assembly. That resolution calls for a report to the assembly by December 10. As a result, delegations will need to make an all-out effort.

Second, we believe that early consideration should be given to collateral measures which would reduce international tension and assist the realization of general disarmament. It is particularly important to take full advantage of the lessons of the Cuban experience to ensure that concrete measures are undertaken to reduce the risk of war and diminish the causes of existing tension. This question of collateral measures has been a Canadian initiative from the beginning.

It will also be necessary to proceed as quickly as possible toward agreement on far reaching measures of general disarmament to be embodied in a comprehensive program. As in the earlier rounds of negotiations in Geneva, the Canadian delegation will make every effort to emphasize areas in which positions of the two sides are close to one another and where a wider measure of agreement should be achieved.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT
Sub-subtopic:   RESUMPTION OF MEETINGS OF COMMITTEE
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Essex East):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to note with satisfaction the announcement of the minister that the 18 member states on the disarmament committee will shortly convene in Geneva. In doing so, I express what I am sure is the general desire of the people of Canada, as well as the membership of this house, that the objectives the government has in mind in this regard will be fully realized. Perhaps, the minister will not mind my saying that it becomes increasingly apparent that the problem is much more difficult than he had first anticipated. Nevertheless, consistent with measures for our security, there will be the strongest desire that progress be made at Geneva this time.

There seems to be some ground for thinking that progress has been made in the matter of the cessation of tests. Certainly if agreement with regard to this matter cannot be reached, it is difficult to conceive how we may look forward realistically in the immediate future to some agreement in the matter of partial or total disarmament.

In any event, the minister may be assured that consistent with our security interests based on the desirability of pinpointing the objects of control and providing for adequate inspection, there will be the strongest desire on the part of the Canadian people that at long last some step may be taken toward progress at this disarmament meeting.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT
Sub-subtopic:   RESUMPTION OF MEETINGS OF COMMITTEE
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SC

Robert Norman Thompson

Social Credit

Mr. R. N. Thompson (Red Deer):

I would also join in giving the Secretary of State for External Affairs assurance of support from our side of the house in his efforts toward this basic objective which must be realized if we are ever going to have peace. I would say this to the minister, that his consistent and persistent efforts in this regard are appreciated. We have awakened out of our lethargy perhaps as the result of the Cuban experience. The point with which I am concerned is that we won round one, but round two might be lost; that is a greater danger to us today than perhaps the crisis which was first precipitated.

Standing upon those principles which are right, upon the need of the basic measures of defence responsibility that we carry, and 27507-3-105

GATT Decision on Surcharges trusting that Canada will lead the way on this question, I may say that she has the respect of the nations of the world and a background that is free from those things which might hinder carrying through this objective. We admit it is an idealistic objective, but it is one which must be reached if reality is to be faced up to at this time.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT
Sub-subtopic:   RESUMPTION OF MEETINGS OF COMMITTEE
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquitlam):

rise merely for the purpose of assuring the Secretary of State for External Affairs that we in this group are appreciative of the efforts which he and his associates have put forth toward promoting the cessation of nuclear tests and bringing about nuclear disarmament. I assure him of our support for any program which he or the Canadian delegation to the disarmament committee care to put forward in this regard. In our opinion one of the strongest things Canada could do in this regard would be to make a clear and unequivocal statement to the effect that Canada will not accept nuclear weapons, nor put them in the hands of Canadian forces.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT
Sub-subtopic:   RESUMPTION OF MEETINGS OF COMMITTEE
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FINANCE

November 15, 1962