November 12, 1962

INTERJECTIONS DURING DEBATES IN CHAMBER

PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I would like the indulgence of hon. members for a few moments before we get into the routine business of the house. The matter about which I wish to speak is something which has previously given the house concern, but during the past few weeks it has manifested itself more particularly. Our Hansard records have had a rather staccato appearance caused by gratuitous interjections into hon. members' speeches by other hon. members.

This creates a very difficult situation. The interjections themselves are quite out of order. I think all hon. members recognize that, and they leave a great responsibility upon the Hansard reporters and Hansard editor to determine, in effect, what are the proceedings of the house. I think it is recognized that this is not a task which should be laid upon them, and the position of acting as censor of Hansard is not one which is sought or ought to be sought by the Speaker.

It will be recognized that within, shall we say, earshot of the Hansard reporters, hon. members on both sides of the house appear to interject a great deal in debates and, frankly, some speeches are just riddled with interjections which are not heard either by the member who has the floor or by the Chair.

They actually consist of a sort of secondary debate by an hon. member who has not got the floor, in addition to which it permits certain hon. members to enter into a debate in a way which is not fair to other hon. members who sit further away from the Hansard reporters' table.

In this regard, I think all hon. members have equal rights in the house, but those hon. members who find themselves at the far end of the chamber and those who are much closer to the chair, if they would want to be heard in the same way would have to shout. Then of course we would be reduced to completely chaotic conditions in the house.

I offer these comments only in the spirit of maintaining the decorum of the house and the proprieties of the proceedings of the house,

and I trust hon. members will govern themselves accordingly. I think it is also known that unfortunately some very good speeches are ofttimes torpedoed by deliberate and gratuitous interjections that are not heard either by the person who has the floor or by the Chair. We cannot say that Hansard reporters or editors must themselves delete these interjections. In conclusion I ask hon. members to govern themselves accordingly in this regard.

Topic:   INTERJECTIONS DURING DEBATES IN CHAMBER
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UNITED NATIONS

APPROVAL OF CANADIAN RESOLUTION

PC

Howard Charles Green (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Howard C. Green (Secretary of Stale for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, on

November 9 the special political committee of the general assembly unanimously approved the text of a resolution on radiation put forward by Canada and co-sponsored by 41 other member states. The vote was 79 in favour, none against, with 11 abstentions. The 11 abstaining countries were the Soviet union and its allies.

The Canadian delegation played a leading role in the drafting and negotiation which led to the unanimous adoption of this resolution. The resolution is divided into two sections. In the first part it asked the scientific committee of the United Nations to continue its assessment of radiation risks as well as its review of ways of increasing man's knowledge of the effects of radiation. It also calls the attention of all member states to the scientific committee's finding that "the exposure of mankind to radiation from increasing numbers of artificial sources including the world wide contamination of the environment with short and long lived radio nuclides from weapons tests, calls for the closest attention", since the effects of radiation increases may not be fully manifested until long after exposure has taken place.

The second part of the resolution commends the world meteorological organization for the plan it has prepared for the world wide monitoring and reporting of the levels of atmospheric radioactivity, and invites the organization to put a plan into operation as soon as possible after its final formulation. On an initiative taken by Canada last year the general assembly recommended that such

1500 HOUSE OF

Canadian Radiation Resolution Approved a plan for monitoring and reporting should be formulated, and implemented if found feasible.

I am sure all hon. members will realize the importance of such measures taken by the United Nations and associated agencies to promote the closest possible scientific cooperation at the international level, with a view to expanding man's knowledge of the effects of atomic radiation on human health. The approval of this resolution without opposition in the special political committee represents a significant forward step toward the achievement of this goal.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF CANADIAN RESOLUTION
Sub-subtopic:   RESPECTING RADIATION
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure all hon. members of the house will appreciate the importance of the passing of this resolution unanimously at the United Nations for the purpose of monitoring and measuring the effect of radiation in the atmosphere. I am sure the Secretary of State for External Affairs will agree with me when I say that even more important is agreement at the United Nations to put an end to those activities which bring about the necessity for such measurement.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF CANADIAN RESOLUTION
Sub-subtopic:   RESPECTING RADIATION
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SC

Robert Norman Thompson

Social Credit

Mr. R. N. Thompson (Red Deer):

Mr. Speaker, I would just like to add a word in this regard. I think the progress which has been made is encouraging, particularly as the resolution we are speaking about was passed with complete unanimity, and points towards the ending of nuclear testing. Certainly we have been made more aware of the dangers of radiation. We mentioned at the time of the Cuban crisis that some good might come out of that near tragedy, and certainly I think this is one of the things that is helping to bring people to their senses in regard to the dangers which face us and the possibility of our own destruction in this world of civilized progress.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF CANADIAN RESOLUTION
Sub-subtopic:   RESPECTING RADIATION
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NDP

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

New Democratic Party

Mr. T. C. Douglas (Burnaby-Coquiilam):

Mr. Speaker, nature already provides sufficient hazards to human health without our also having to combat the man-made hazards resulting from nuclear testing. I am sure all hon. members will consider the resolution which has been passed at the United Nations, providing for the measuring and monitoring of the effects of radiation, to be a forward step. I am sure all of us will feel that the important step is to reach the stage where nuclear testing can be discontinued by unanimous agreement and under international inspection and control.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF CANADIAN RESOLUTION
Sub-subtopic:   RESPECTING RADIATION
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

WITHDRAWAL OF MOTION ON ORDER PAPER

LIB

Alan Aylesworth Macnaughton

Liberal

Mr. Alan Macnaughion (Mount Royal):

Mr. Speaker, by leave of the house I would like to withdraw motion No. 29 standing in my name, providing for the holding of a world's fair in Montreal, appearing on page 31 of today's order paper. I think it is well known that I have been very active for several years in promoting this matter, and with the co-operation of the municipal, provincial and federal governments I hope we will realize this great potential.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   WITHDRAWAL OF MOTION ON ORDER PAPER
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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Is it agreed the motion shall be withdrawn?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   WITHDRAWAL OF MOTION ON ORDER PAPER
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Order discharged and motion withdrawn.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   WITHDRAWAL OF MOTION ON ORDER PAPER
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CRIMINAL CODE

AMENDMENT RESPECTING APPEAL IN HABEAS CORPUS PROCEEDINGS

LIB

John Ross Matheson

Liberal

Mr. John R. Maiheson (Leeds) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. C-77, to amend the Criminal Code.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT RESPECTING APPEAL IN HABEAS CORPUS PROCEEDINGS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Explain.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT RESPECTING APPEAL IN HABEAS CORPUS PROCEEDINGS
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LIB

John Ross Matheson

Liberal

Mr. Matheson:

Mr. Speaker, the only

change suggested is the adding of three words, "or habeas corpus" at the end of subsection (1) of section 691.

It has been decided in the case of re Shane that a prisoner has no right of appeal from an order of a judge refusing a discharge under habeas corpus proceedings, neither can he apply from judge to judge of a court until he obtains a decision in his favour. Action to resolve the condition of affairs which now exists was suggested by the chief justice of the high court of Ontario on May 20, 1959.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT RESPECTING APPEAL IN HABEAS CORPUS PROCEEDINGS
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


November 12, 1962