October 11, 1962

NDP

Douglas Mason Fisher

New Democratic Party

Mr. Fisher:

The Liberals have contempt for the new boys, the shaggy fellows on the other periphery of politics. Things were not what they used to be when good old Bud and good old Mitch were deputy ministers. They say to themselves that these new people cannot possibly know the arcana which are revealed only slowly, through imperceptible drops and over long periods, to those who are truly on the inside-the inside with the Liberal party. The senior civil service caste, or the mandarin caste if you prefer, has been allowed to set the tone of the party, and this means worship for the administrative expertise of Mike and Pick and Bud and Walter.

In the abstract sense, essentially liberalism is a creed which preserves permanent values by destructive means. By this I mean that the liberal is always striving to uphold the individual's rights and enlarge the scope of individuality, while striving at the same time to relate these goods to the broader good of society as a whole, and he must suspect anything which does not contribute to these goods automatically. He has not the time for veneration of this or that time-honoured administrative liberal practice. He is or he ought to be right in step with the whole movement of life. He accepts change. He even accepts his ousting from government with a little bit of grace. He tries to guide change or even to anticipate it, and he does this through programs, through legislation and through positive action.

Now if I might skim through the Liberal program.

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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

Put it on the record.

The Address-Mr. Valade

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NDP

Douglas Mason Fisher

New Democratic Party

Mr. Fisher:

I repeat that this is nothing more than an argument of administrative genius, but if the Liberal party has this administrative genius and at the same time draws the support of superb fellows like Joey Smallwood, with his economic blackmail to mute rivals, or Ross Thatcher kicking down the doors of empty chambers, surely that is some reason why we hesitate to see this Liberal party as the means for Canada's salvation, as a chance for us to join a party of the democratic left.

Today the fact is that genuine liberalism is called for, but the bitter conclusion I have to reach is that genuine liberalism has been all but stifled in the very party which nurtured it in this country, or claims to nurture it, and which considers itself to have a chance of forming the next government. I cannot give a better example than the dull, uninspiring history of the Liberal party by the hon. member for Bonavista-Twillingate and then contrast its dullness and hypocrisy with the wonderful job he did on Mackenzie King and his diaries. In his story of the Liberal party you can see the limitations that are put on a liberal within the Liberal party.

There is no doubt in my mind that, despite the wonderful plea we had this day from the hon. member for Hamilton East (Mr. Munro), there is not much appearance of genuine liberalism in the Liberal party, and I can say to the Minister of Finance, that funny whimsical fellow who loves these boys across the way, "do not worry too much about this diagonal love affair between the Liberals and the New Democratic party because I have the feeling that they will have to reveal, in this parliament and in their program, much more than just the dogma of administrative genius, or should I call it the dogma of Pick-ersgill's infallibility?

(Translation):

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PC

Georges-J. Valade

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Georges Valade (St. Mary):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to join my colleagues in offering you my warmest congratulations on your appointment as Speaker of the house. Having been chosen to All this post is a great honour for you and we know that you deserve it because of the work you did here in the past.

I also wish to join the members of this house to congratulate the mover and seconder of the address in reply to the speech from the throne.

Mr. Speaker, I wish in particular to greet the many young members who, like myself five years ago, made their maiden speech in the house during the last few days. I have noticed also, in the last federal election, that in the Montreal area, at least 19 Liberal mem-

bers were needed to replace one good Conservative member.

(Text):

Mr. Speaker, I was listening to the arguments being advanced a few moments ago and I was surprised to notice that these people from the left side of politics, these socialist inclined people, have forgotten their responsibility in this house, the responsibility which was given to them by a colleague of theirs who had courage enough to resign his seat as member of parliament for Burnaby-Coquit-lam. In his direction to the party that former member said he believed a minority government could be a good thing for the people of this country because he believed that a minority government can do more for the people than a majority government.

We have now seen these people turning around and rejecting this sensible policy from one of their former colleagues, and trying to overthrow this government not, as it was said, in the interests of the people but to serve their own political purposes.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, the last federal election has shown that the present Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Pearson) is not the man the Liberal party needs to win in Canada. He has met defeat twice in a row and even if the Liberals show him some consideration by treating him with respect, it is obvious that they have entirely lost confidence in a man who has led them to two consecutive defeats. Dissatisfaction is growing in the ranks of younger Liberals and we would not be surprised if the Leader of the Opposition suddenly took ill and if that pretext were used to replace the present leader of the federal Liberal party by the future leader of the provincial Liberal opposition, Mr. Lesage.

Besides, the Liberals are highly competent as far as Liberal prophecies are concerned. In La Presse of June 13, 1962 there was an article saying:

Lesage predicts Pearson victory.

That is all the competence, the foresight, the accurateness of our friends opposite.

Well, if the Liberals have suffered three defeats since their leader has been in office, they owe it to unreasonable politics, false causes and double dealings.

The Liberal promises during this campaign, Mr. Speaker, we can find in the small textbook, in the bible of the Liberal party published by their own officials and advisers.

This program contains dazzling promises. It mentions an increase of old age pension up to $75; it mentions assistance to widows

and single women as they reach 60 years of age. It contains, as a matter of fact, a whole gamut of electoral promises.

Then there is the member for Assiniboia (Mr. Argue) a new convert to the Liberal cause. I would point out to my friends opposite that when I said the word "convert" I had in mind-let it be said without being disrespectful to the member for Assiniboia- the word "turncoat" that the Liberals change into "convert". According to Hansard of January 23, 1962, the member said:

Canadians have the right to know from what sources will come the amount needed to pay for the numerous and considerable expenses which are announced.

Thus spoke the hon. member for Assiniboia during the debate on the speech from the throne, in 1962.

Well, my Liberal friends, if you want to be logical with your new convert, you had better find out who is going to pay before you make any promises to the electorate. That, Mr. Speaker, is one of the reasons why the leader of the Liberal party was so badly defeated for the third time.

The Liberal vade mecum contains statements which can only bring a smile to the lips of those who are familiar with their platform.

Here is a quotation from page 4 of the Liberal manifesto for 1962:

The Liberal party of Canada favours dynamic good citizenship which will give every citizen the opportunity of fully developing his personality.

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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

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PC

Georges-J. Valade

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Valade:

Mr. Speaker, I enjoy Liberal applause a great deal. However, if they read the newspapers, they would find out what people think of their civism, the way they put it into practice and not the way it is written in the Liberal program.

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?

An hon. Member:

Conservative civism.

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PC

Georges-J. Valade

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Valade:

In the Ottawa Journal of September 25, 1962, one can read the following about the civism of the Leader of the Opposition:

(Text):

Small wonder that this week we had the leaders of our Social Credit and other parties rejecting Mr. Pearson for "playing politics''. For he is not only playing politics; he is playing the most unworthy and un-Canadian sort of politics.

Does this mean, I ask you, Mr. Speaker, "communist politics"? There is no surprise that there is a blockade now on the Liberal side, because they are afraid of the truth.

(Translation):

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LIB

Azellus Denis

Liberal

Mr. Denis:

I rise on a point of order. Let us see the newspaper.

The Address-Mr. Valade

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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

The hon. member for St. Denis rises on a point of order.

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LIB

Azellus Denis

Liberal

Mr. Denis:

My point of order is that the house should be informed of the source of the quotation and of the date of the newspaper.

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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

If the hon. member had followed the speech, he would know to what publication his colleague was referring.

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PC

Georges-J. Valade

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Valade:

Mr. Speaker, that is a striking example of the fact that, in certain parts of Quebec, it is not because of their competence that Liberal members were elected.

Mr. Speaker, I would have liked to hear the host of members who were to talk to us about a new sense of political responsibility, in the Liberal manner, which calls obviously for the destruction of the efforts so eloquently made by the Prime Minister of Canada (Mr. Diefenbaker) when he was in London, at the beginning of September, to fight for the interests of Canada's business men and workers.

I have not yet heard a single Liberal member talk seriously about a matter which, today, is considered of vital importance to our business men: the common market. I would have liked to know why, after 22, 20 or 15 years in power, they did not manage to find the time to study such an important matter as the common market, to tell the house what they think of it.

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?

An hon. Member:

Right.

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PC

Georges-J. Valade

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Valade:

I think that the non-commitment of the Liberals in this respect lead us to suspect a shade of dishonesty in their policy. They know very well that the stand taken by the Prime Minister in London was in the interests of Canada and the Canadians.

Mr. Speaker, I propose to deal tonight with the common market issue because it is a question which concerns not only the members but also all Canadians, the businessmen as well as the workers.

The Conservative convention, which opened today in London will provide for a stormy debate regarding Great Britain's entry into the free trade area of the common market.

Due to the consequences of that issue on the economic future of our country and the subjective stand taken by the Leader of the Opposition in this respect, I believe it is my duty to express my opinion on this matter.

The implications of Great Britain's entry into the E.E.C. are such, for Canada, that it is necessary to consider their results.

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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

It being 9.45 o'clock p.m. it is my duty pursuant to section 5 of standing order 38 to interrupt the proceedings and put the motion now before the house.

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PC

Marcel Joseph Aimé Lambert (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I declare the motion carried.

Appointment of Supply Committee

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LIB

Alan Aylesworth Macnaughton

Liberal

Mr. Macnaughion:

I was paired with the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Fulton). Had I voted, I would have voted against the motion.

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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister) moved:

That the address be engrossed and presented to His Excellency the Governor General by such members of this house as are of the honourable the privy council.

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Motion agreed to.


October 11, 1962